Alan Smithee

Director, Screenwriter, Producer
Pseudonym designated by the Directors Guild of America to replace the actual names of directors who wish to not be credited for a particular film. The name seems to have been first used for "Death of a Gunfighter" ... Read more »

Filmography

Director (12)

Gypsy Angels 1994 (Movie)

(Director)

The Birds II: Land's End 1993 - 1994 (TV Show)

Director

MacGyver 1985 - 1992 (Tv Show)

Director

Paper Dolls 1984 - 1992 (Tv Show)

Director

The Twilight Zone 1985 - 1992 (Tv Show)

Director

Bodyguard 1989 - 1990 (TV Show)

Director

Juarez 1987 - 1988 (TV Show)

Director

Dalton: Code of Vengeance 1985 - 1986 (TV Show)

Director

Omnibus 1980 - 1981 (TV Show)

Director

The Challenge 1969 - 1970 (TV Show)

Director

Call of the Wild (TV Show)

Director

The Disciples (TV Show)

Director
Writer (3)

Monster That Ate Hollywood 2001 - 2002 (TV Show)

Writer

Anatole 1998 - 2000 (TV Show)

Writer

The Horror Show 1989 (Movie)

(Screenplay)
Production Management (1)

Twilight Zone - the Movie 1983 (Movie)

("Back There") (Assistant Director)
Producer (1)

Egg: The Arts Show 1984 - 1992, 1999 - 2003 (Tv Show)

Segment Producer

Biography

Pseudonym designated by the Directors Guild of America to replace the actual names of directors who wish to not be credited for a particular film. The name seems to have been first used for "Death of a Gunfighter" (1969) which was actually directed by, among others, Don Siegel. Other Smithee credits include the severely edited TV version of "Dune", the original theatrical version of which was directed by David Lynch, and "Let's Get Harry" (1987), directed by Stuart Rosenberg but released with nearly half an hour cut out. In 1998, Joe Eszterhas scripted "Burn, Hollywood, Burn", an insider comedy about a British director named Alan Smithee who wants to remove his name from a film he directed. Ironically, the film was credited to Alan Smithee (in reality Arthur Hiller who clashed with the screenwriter over the final cut).

Bonus Trivia

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The name Alan Smithee has become so well known that producers, screenwriter, editors and even a sound recordist have employed it.

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After the release of "Burn, Hollywood, Burn" in 1998, the DGA gave thought to retiring the moniker of "Alan Smithee". As of January 2000, one suggested replacement was Thomas Lee (used for Walter Hill on "Supernova"). Arthur Hiller, president of the DGA, issued a statement suggesting the world had not seen the last of Alan Smithee.

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In March 2002, the cable channel American Movie Classics aired the documentary "Who Is Alan Smithee?"

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