Alfred Hitchcock

Director, Screenwriter, Producer
The acknowledged master of the thriller genre he virtually invented, director Alfred Hitchcock was also a brilliant technician who deftly blended sex, suspense and humor while creating a number of motifs and devices ... Read more »
Born: 08/13/1899 in Leytonstone, England, GB

Filmography

Director (48)

The Lady Vanishes 1999 (Movie)

(Director)

Family Plot 1976 (Movie)

(Director)

Frenzy 1971 (Movie)

(Director)

Topaz 1969 (Movie)

(Director)

Torn Curtain 1966 (Movie)

(Director)

Marnie 1964 (Movie)

(Director)

The Birds 1963 (Movie)

(Director)

Psycho 1960 (Movie)

(Director)

North By Northwest 1959 (Movie)

(Director)

Suspicion 1957 - 1958 (Tv Show)

Director

Vertigo 1958 (Movie)

(Director)

The Man Who Knew Too Much 1956 (Movie)

(Director)

The Wrong Man 1956 (Movie)

(Director)

The Trouble With Harry 1955 (Movie)

(Director)

To Catch a Thief 1955 (Movie)

(Director)

Dial M For Murder 1954 (Movie)

(Director)

Rear Window 1954 (Movie)

(Director)

I Confess 1953 (Movie)

(Director)

Strangers On a Train 1951 (Movie)

(Director)

Stage Fright 1950 (Movie)

(Director)

Rope 1948 (Movie)

(Director)

The Paradine Case 1947 (Movie)

(Director)

Notorious 1946 (Movie)

(Director)

Spellbound 1945 (Movie)

(Director)

Lifeboat 1944 (Movie)

(Director)

Shadow of a Doubt 1943 (Movie)

(Director)

Saboteur 1941 (Movie)

(Director)

Mr. & Mrs. Smith 1940 (Movie)

(Director)

Rebecca 1940 (Movie)

(Director)

Suspicion 1940 (Movie)

(Director)

Foreign Correspondent 1939 (Movie)

(Director)

Jamaica Inn 1938 (Movie)

(Director)

Young and Innocent 1937 (Movie)

(Director)

Sabotage 1936 (Movie)

(Director)

Secret Agent 1935 (Movie)

(Director)

The 39 Steps 1935 (Movie)

(Director)

The Man Who Knew Too Much 1933 (Movie)

(Director)

Blackmail 1929 (Movie)

(Director)

Juno and the Paycock 1929 (Movie)

(Director)

The Manxman 1928 (Movie)

(Director)

Champagne 1927 (Movie)

(Director)

Downhill 1926 (Movie)

(Director)

The Lodger 1925 (Movie)

(Director)

Jamaica Inn (Movie)

(Director)

The Skin Game (Movie)

(Director)

Under Capricorn (Movie)

(Director)

Waltzes from Vienna (Movie)

(Director)
Producer (21)

Family Plot 1976 (Movie)

(Producer)

Frenzy 1971 (Movie)

(Producer)

Topaz 1969 (Movie)

(Producer)

Torn Curtain 1966 (Movie)

(Producer)

Marnie 1964 (Movie)

(Producer)

The Birds 1963 (Movie)

(Producer)

Psycho 1960 (Movie)

(Producer)

North By Northwest 1959 (Movie)

(Producer)

Vertigo 1958 (Movie)

(Producer)

The Man Who Knew Too Much 1956 (Movie)

(Producer)

The Wrong Man 1956 (Movie)

(Producer)

The Trouble With Harry 1955 (Movie)

(Producer)

To Catch a Thief 1955 (Movie)

(Producer)

Dial M For Murder 1954 (Movie)

(Producer)

Rear Window 1954 (Movie)

(Producer)

I Confess 1953 (Movie)

(Producer)

Strangers On a Train 1951 (Movie)

(Producer)

Stage Fright 1950 (Movie)

(Producer)

Rope 1948 (Movie)

(Producer)

Notorious 1946 (Movie)

(Producer)

Under Capricorn (Movie)

(Producer)
Writer (11)

Notorious 1991 - 1992 (TV Show)

Story By

Shadow of a Doubt 1990 - 1991 (TV Show)

Story By

Bates Motel 1986 - 1987 (TV Show)

Story By

Charters & Caldicott 1985 - 1986 (TV Show)

Characters as Source Material

Blackmail 1929 (Movie)

adaptation (Writer (adaptation))

Blackmail 1929 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Juno and the Paycock 1929 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Champagne 1927 (Movie)

adaptation (Writer (adaptation))

Champagne 1927 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Lodger 1925 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Skin Game (Movie)

(Screenwriter)
Actor (10)

Innocent Blood 1992 (Movie)

Man with Cello Case (Actor)

Hollywood: The Selznick Years 1968 - 1969 (TV Show)

Actor

Alfred Hitchcock Presents 1955 - 1965 (TV Show)

Actor

North By Northwest 1959 (Movie)

Man Who Misses Bus (Actor)

The Gazebo 1959 (Movie)

on Phone (Voice)

The Wrong Man 1956 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

To Catch a Thief 1955 (Movie)

Man Seated Next to Cary Grant on Bus (Actor)

Dial M For Murder 1954 (Movie)

Man in Club Photo (Actor)

Rear Window 1954 (Movie)

Butler in Songwriter's Apartment (Actor)
Other (11)

Crimes and Misdemeanors 1989 (Movie)

film extract("Mr. and Mrs. Smith" (1941)) (Other)

Heart of Midnight 1989 (Movie)

film extract("The 39 Steps") (Other)

Going Hollywood: The War Years 1987 (Movie)

film extract("Foreign Correspondent" (1940)) (Other)

Made in Heaven 1987 (Movie)

film extract("Notorious" (1946)) (Other)

Throw Momma From the Train 1987 (Movie)

film extract("Strangers on a Train" (1951)) (Other)

Marlene 1986 (Movie)

film extract("Stage Fright" (1950)) (Other)

Psycho III 1986 (Movie)

film extract("Psycho" (1960)) (Other)

The Boy Who Could Fly 1986 (Movie)

film extract("To Catch a Thief" (1955)) (Other)

Desperately Seeking Susan 1985 (Movie)

film extract("Rebecca" (1940)) (Other)

Terror in the Aisles 1984 (Movie)

film extracts("To Catch a Thief" (1955) "The Birds" (1963) "Psycho" (1960) "Strangers on a Train" (1951)) (Other)

Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid 1982 (Movie)

film extracts("Suspicion" (1941) "Notorious" (1946)) (Other)

Biography

The acknowledged master of the thriller genre he virtually invented, director Alfred Hitchcock was also a brilliant technician who deftly blended sex, suspense and humor while creating a number of motifs and devices - most famously the MacGuffin - to advance his intricate plots. Hitchcock went through four distinct periods throughout his career, starting with his silent period where he made "The Lodger" (1926) and a handful of others before entering the sound era and properly beginning his so-called British period. During the 1930s, he honed his master of suspense chops with a number of acclaimed espionage films like "The 39 Steps" (1935), "The Secret Agent" (1936) and "Sabotage" (1936). He attracted the attention of Hollywood with "The Lady Vanishes" (1938) and embarked on the third phase of his career, starting with "Rebecca" (1940), "Foreign Correspondent" (1940), "Suspicion" (1941) and "Shadow of a Doubt" (1943). After "Spellbound" (1945), Hitchcock directed "Notorious" (1946), his most emotionally mature film at the time. Fond of ordinary men accused of crimes they did not commit and icy blondes in despair, Hitchcock entered the most artistically fruitful part of his career, directing "Strangers on a Train" (1951), "To Catch a Thief" (1955) and "The Wrong Man" (1956) alongside masterpieces like "Rear Window" (1954), "Vertigo" (1958), "North by Northwest" (1959) and "Psycho" (1960). Though he faltered after "The Birds" (1963), Hitchcock remained a highly influential director whose life and career retained a high level of interest decades after his death.

Relationships

William Hitchcock

Father
Catholic, died when Hitchcock was 14 on December 12, 1914

Emma Hitchcock

Mother
Catholic

Patricia O'Connell

Daughter
born c. 1929

Alma Reville

Wife
born c. 1900 married in 1926 survived him died on July 6, 1982

EDUCATION

University of London

St Ignatius College

1908
Catholic school

School of Engineering and Navigation

(mechanics, electricity, acoustics, navigation)

Milestones

1976

Final feature, "Family Plot"

1972

Directed "Frenzy", about a serial killer

1968

Helmed the spy thriller "Topaz"

1966

Teamed Julie Andrews and Paul Newman in "Torn Curtain"

1964

Second movie with Hedren, "Marnie"

1963

First of two films with Tippi Hedren, "The Birds"

1960

Helmed the "Incident at a Corner" episode of "Ford Star Time" (CBS)

1960

Directed the classic "Psycho", featuring Anthony Perkins; earned fifth and last Best Director Oscar nomination

1959

Final collaboration with Cary Grant, "North by Northwest"

1958

Last film with James Stewart, "Vertigo"

1956

Remade "The Man Who Wasn't There" with James Stewart and Doris Day

1955

Third film with Grace Kelly, "To Catch a Thief"; also starred Cary Grant

1955

Hosted and executive produced the anthology series "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (CBS, 1955-1960; NBC, 1960-1962); also directed 17 episodes

1954

Teamed Kelly with James Stewart in "Rear Window"; fourth Oscar nomination for Best Director

1954

Directed Grant and Grace Kelly in "Dial M for Murder"

1953

Helmed "I Confess", starring Montgomery Clift as a priest

1951

Made "Strangers on a Train", starring Robert Walker and Farley Granger

1949

Last film with Ingrid Bergman, "Under Capricorn"

1948

Initial collaboration with James Stewart, "Rope"

1946

Made the classic "Notorious", featuring Bergman and Grant

1944

Helmed "Spellbound", the first of three films with Ingrid Bergman; earned third Academy Award nomination as Best Director

1943

Earned second Best Director Oscar nomination with "Lifeboat"

1942

Made "Saboteur" and "Shadow of a Doubt"

1940

Directed Joan Fontaine in an Oscar-winning performance in "Suspicion"; first film with Cary Grant

1940

Made the atypical screwball comedy "Mr. and Mrs. Smith"

1940

American film directing debut with "Rebecca", which won the Best Picture Oscar; received first Academy Award nomination as Best Director

1939

Signed by David O. Selznick, moved to Hollywood

1938

Made "The Lady Vanishes"

1935

Directed the classic "The 39 Steps"

1934

Helmed "The Man Who Knew Too Much"

1932

Wrote and directed the comedy thriller "Number Seventeen"

1930

Set up public relations firm Hitchcock Baker Productions

1929

Directed first British synchronous sound film "Blackmail"; also co-wrote script with Charles Bennet and Benn W. Levy

1927

Co-wrote (with Alma Reville) and directed, "The Ring"

1927

Made the suspense thriller "The Lodger", starring Ivor Novello

1925

Feature film directing debut with "The Pleasure Garden"

1923

First film as assistant director, art director and sole writer "Woman to Woman"

1923

Hired as assistant director by Balcon-Saville-Freedman

1922

Short film directing debut with "Number 13/Mrs. Peabody" (never completed)

1922

Made assistant director when Famous Players taken over by Michael Balcon's production company

1920

Began career as title designer for London branch of Famous Players-Lasky

Produced the anthology series "Suspicion" (NBC); directed one episode ("Four o'Clock")

Hosted and executive produced "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour" (CBS, 1962-1964; NBC, 1964-1965); also directed the episode entitled "I Saw the Whole Thing"

Made head of title department

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