Arthur Penn

Director, Producer, Screenwriter
Arthur Penn proved himself a true triple threat during his career, achieving extraordinary success as a director of live television dramas, Broadway plays and feature films. Like Sidney Lumet and John Frankenheimer, he ... Read more »
Born: 09/26/1922 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Filmography

Director (20)

100 Centre Street 1994 - 1997, 2000 - 2002 (Tv Show)

Director

Playhouse 90 1956 - 1960, 1994 - 1997, 2000 - 2002 (Tv Show)

Director

Lumiere Et Compagnie 1995 (Movie)

featured director (Director)

Penn & Teller Get Killed 1989 (Movie)

(Director)

Dead of Winter 1987 (Movie)

(Director)

Target 1985 (Movie)

(Director)

Four Friends 1981 (Movie)

(Director)

Night Moves 1975 (Movie)

(Director)

The Missouri Breaks 1975 (Movie)

(Director)

Visions of Eight 1973 (Movie)

("The Highest") (Director)

Little Big Man 1970 (Movie)

(Director)

Alice's Restaurant 1969 (Movie)

(Director)

Flesh and Blood 1967 - 1968 (TV Show)

Director

Bonnie and Clyde 1967 (Movie)

(Director)

The Chase 1966 (Movie)

(Director)

Mickey One 1965 (Movie)

(Director)

The Miracle Worker 1961 (Movie)

(Director)

The Left-Handed Gun 1958 (Movie)

(Director)

Inside (TV Show)

Director

The Portrait (TV Show)

Director
Actor (12)

AFI's 100 Years..100 Heroes and Villains 2002 - 2003 (TV Show)

Actor

BeastMaster 1999 - 2002 (TV Show)

Actor

Inside the Actors Studio 1994 - 1997 (Tv Show)

Interviewee

Nichols and May -- Take Two 1995 - 1996 (TV Show)

Actor

Rod Serling: Submitted For Your Approval 1995 - 1996 (TV Show)

Actor

The Moviemakers: Arthur Penn 1995 - 1996 (TV Show)

Actor

American Cinema 1994 - 1995 (TV Show)

Actor

Marlon Brando, Wild One 1993 - 1994 (TV Show)

Actor

Hello Actors Studio 1988 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Edge of Outside (TV Show)

Actor
Producer (4)

Law & Order 2000 - 2001 (Tv Show)

Executive Producer

Penn & Teller Get Killed 1989 (Movie)

(Producer)

Four Friends 1981 (Movie)

(Producer)

Mickey One 1965 (Movie)

(Producer)
Writer (1)

Alice's Restaurant 1969 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Biography

Arthur Penn proved himself a true triple threat during his career, achieving extraordinary success as a director of live television dramas, Broadway plays and feature films. Like Sidney Lumet and John Frankenheimer, he owed a huge debt to the crucible of television's Golden Age, but it was director Elia Kazan he resembled most in his sympathy for actors, the flights of fancy he allowed, and the incredible range of expression he elicited in films like "The Miracle Worker" (1962), "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967) and "Little Big Man" (1970). Penn understood the poetry of close-up camera work, acknowledging that words were to the theater what actions were for film. His use of lighting and sound were stylistically and intellectually sophisticated, but ultimately it was his themes which propelled his pictures. No other director during the volatile 1960s had his finger so securely on America's pulse, and audiences responded enthusiastically to his exploration of the relationship between outsiders and mainstream society, even though his sympathies always seemed to lie invariably with the outcasts.

Relationships

Peggy Maurer

Wife
Married January 27, 1955

Harry Penn

Father
Owned a small watch-repair business divorced Penn's mother c. 1926 died in 1943

Sonia Penn

Mother
Divorced Penn's father c. 1926

Molly Penn

Daughter
Born in 1964 mother, Peggy Maurer

Matthew Penn

Son
Born in 1959 mother, Peggy Maurer has directed numerous episodes of "Law & Order" (NBC)

Irving Penn

Brother
Successful still photographer

EDUCATION

Black Mountain College

Ashville , North Carolina 1947 - 1949

University of Perugia

Perugia

Actors Studio

Los Angeles , California

University of Florence

Olney High School

Philadelphia , Pennsylvania

Milestones

2002

Returned to stage to direct "Fortune's Fool" with Alan Bates and Frank Langella

2000

Became an executive producer on NBC's "Law & Order"

1996

Directed the Showtime movie "Inside," about the excesses of apartheid in South Africa

1995

Contributed to the omnibus project, "Lumiere and Company"

1989

Helmed last feature film, "Penn and Teller Get Killed"

1987

Directed Ron Silver and Dianne Wiest in "Hunting Cockroaches" for NYC's Manhattan Theatre Club

1985

Third film with Hackman, "Target"

1981

Produced and directed "Four Friends" from an autobiographical script by Steve Tesich

1977

Returned to Broadway as director of "Golda," starring Anne Bancroft as Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir

1976

Directed George C. Scott in "Sly Fox" on Broadway

1975

Directed "Night Moves," featuring Gene Hackman

1973

Directed one section of the eight-director documentary on the 1972 Munich Olympics, "Visions of Eight"; his segment, "The Highest" dealt with pole-vaulting

1969

Presented view of the American West where the Indians were the good guys in "Little Big Man"

1968

Co-wrote (with Venable Herndon) and directed "Alice's Restaurant"; received third Academy Award nomination for Best Director

1967

Earned second Academy Award nomination for directing "Bonnie and Clyde"; re-teamed with Beatty (who also produced); first of six collaborations with editor Dede Allen

1966

Directed Marlon Brando and Jane Fonda in "The Chase"

1965

Produced and directed "Mickey One," starring Warren Beatty

1962

Adapted "The Miracle Worker" for the big screen; re-teamed with Bancroft and Duke; earned first Academy Award nomination as Best Director

1960

Earned a Tony nomination for directing "All the Way Home"

1960

Won a Tony directing Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke in the Broadway version of "The Miracle Worker"

1958

Made feature directorial debut, "The Left-Handed Gun"; produced by Coe

1958

Directed Gibson's "Two for the Seesaw" on Broadway; starred Henry Fonda and Anne Bancroft; earned a Tony nomination

1957

Helmed William Gibson's "The Miracle Worker" for "Playhouse 90"

1956

Moved to CBS, where he directed for "Playhouse 90"

1956

Made inauspicious Broadway debut, directing "The Lovers"; closed after only four days

1955

Staged a production of James Leo Herlihy's "Blue Denim" for summer stock company in Westport, CT

1953

Invited to New York by Fred Coe to direct "Gulf Playhouse: 1st Person" (NBC)

1951

Began working at NBC-TV in NYC as floor manager on the "Colgate Comedy Hour"; worked his way up to assistant director; moved to Los Angeles when show relocated there

1944

Joined U.S. Army's Soldier Show Company (headed by Joshua Logan; members included Mickey Rooney and Paddy Chayefsky)

1942

Served in U.S. Army during WWII

Began writing and directing TV dramas for "Philco Television Playhouse" (NBC)

Formed dramatic group in Fort Jackson, SC; while in military service met future associate, producer Fred Coe

Spent two years studying literature at Italian colleges

Worked for local radio station in Philadelphia, PA

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