Bert Schneider

Producer
Having emerged during Hollywood's new wave of the late 1960s and early 1970s, iconoclastic producer Bert Schneider was responsible for shepherding some of his time's most heralded classics. After partnering with ... Read more »
Born: 05/05/1933 in New York, New York, USA

Filmography

Producer (10)

Broken English 1981 (Movie)

(Producer)

Days of Heaven 1978 (Movie)

(Producer)

Gentleman Tramp 1975 (Movie)

(Producer)

Hearts and Minds 1975 (Movie)

(Producer)

Drive, He Said 1971 (Movie)

(Producer)

The Last Picture Show 1971 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

A Safe Place 1970 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Five Easy Pieces 1970 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Easy Rider 1969 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Head 1968 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Biography

Having emerged during Hollywood's new wave of the late 1960s and early 1970s, iconoclastic producer Bert Schneider was responsible for shepherding some of his time's most heralded classics. After partnering with director Bob Rafelson to create the pop culture phenomenon, "The Monkees" (NBC, 1966-68), Schneider entered the film business with The Monkees' disappointing feature debut, "Head" (1968), which marked the beginning of his fruitful collaboration with Jack Nicholson. With his next film, "Easy Rider" (1969), he helped usher in the New Hollywood era with the counterculture classic that was one of the biggest hits of the year while turning Nicholson into a major star. Schneider worked with the actor again on the Academy Award-nominated drama, "Five Easy Pieces" (1970), before producing Peter Bogdanovich's masterpiece "The Last Picture Show" (1971). After bankrolling Nicholson's rather disappointing directing debut, "Drive, He Said" (1972), Schneider won an Oscar for his Vietnam War documentary, "Hearts and Minds" (1974), while managing to cause a bit of controversy while accepting his win. He went on to produce several forgettable movies before working on Terrence Malick's exceptional "Days of Heaven" (1978). Schneider left Hollywood after "Broken English" (1981) to focus on battling political causes and his drug addiction, leaving behind a short, but lasting legacy as one of New Hollywood's great producers.

Relationships

Candice Bergen Actor

Companion
Together from 1971-74

Greta Ronningen

Wife

Harold Schneider Producer

Brother
Younger

Abraham Schneider

Father
Ran Columbia Pictures in the late 1960s

Judy Schneider

Wife
Married on Dec. 25, 1954 Separated in February 1971 Divorced

Audrey Schneider

Daughter

Jeffrey Schneider

Son

Stanley Schneider

Brother
Older; deceased

EDUCATION

Cornell University

Ithaca , New York
Dropped out; later worked with his father at Screen Gems

Milestones

1999

Partly inspired Peter Fonda's character Terry Valentine in the Steven Soderbergh crime drama "The Limey"

1997

Featured in the documentary "Hey, Hey We're the Monkees"

1981

Produced final film, Michie Gleason's "Broken English"

1978

Produced Terrence Malick's romantic drama "Days of Heaven," starring Richard Gere and Sam Shepard

1974

Produced the Vietnam War documentary "Hearts and Minds"; won the Oscar for Best Documentary, Features; while accepting the Oscar, read a telegram offering "greetings of friendship" from the head of the North Vietnamese delegation to the Paris peace talks,

1970

Executive produced the Oscar-winning "The Last Picture Show," directed by Peter Bogdanovich

1970

Produced Nicholson's feature directorial debut "Drive, He Said"

1969

Executive produced the drama "Five Easy Pieces," starring Nicholson and directed by Rafelson

1968

First film collaboration with Jack Nicholson, "Easy Rider" in which Nicholson played a supporting role; directed by Dennis Hopper; made for less than $300,000, the film grossed $20 million in box office

1968

Early executive producing credit, The Monkees' feature film "Head" directed by Rafelson

1966

Produced the NBC series "The Monkees," featuring the titular musical group; co-created with Bob Rafelson; made a cameo during an episode that aired in 1968

1965

Quit Screen Gems to form Raybert Productions with Bob Rafelson

1953

After expulsion from Cornell, went to work for his father Abraham at Screen Gems, the television division of Columbia Pictures

Raised in New Rochelle, NY

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