Bill Idelson

Bill Idelson began his career as a child actor, before working as a writer, producer, and director later in his career. He first began acting on the radio drama "Uncle Walt and Skeezix" (Idelson played the latter ... Read more »
Born: 08/21/1919 in Forest Park, Illinois, USA

Filmography

Writer (9)

M*A*S*H 1972 - 1983 (TV Show)

Writer

The Betty White Show 1977 - 1978 (TV Show)

Writer

The Bob Newhart Show 1972 - 1978 (TV Show)

Writer

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner 1974 - 1975 (TV Show)

Writer

Barefoot in The Park 1970 - 1971 (TV Show)

Writer

Get Smart 1965 - 1970 (TV Show)

Writer

Gomer Pyle USMC 1964 - 1970 (TV Show)

Writer

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir 1968 - 1970 (TV Show)

Writer

Fish (TV Show)

Writer
Actor (7)

The Dick Van Dyke Show Revisited 2003 - 2004 (TV Show)

Actor

Will & Grace 2001 (Tv Show)

Actor

Suddenly Susan 1999 - 2000 (Tv Show)

Actor

Fred and Barney Meet the Shmoo 1979 - 1981 (TV Show)

Voice

The New Shmoo 1979 - 1980 (TV Show)

Voice

My Favorite Martian 1963 - 1966 (TV Show)

Actor

The Dick Van Dyke Show 1961 - 1966 (TV Show)

Actor
Producer (4)

Beane's of Boston 1978 - 1979 (TV Show)

Producer

The Montefuscos 1975 - 1976 (TV Show)

Producer

Love, American Style 1969 - 1974 (TV Show)

Producer

Anna and the King 1972 - 1973 (TV Show)

Producer

Biography

Bill Idelson began his career as a child actor, before working as a writer, producer, and director later in his career. He first began acting on the radio drama "Uncle Walt and Skeezix" (Idelson played the latter character), before appearing in small parts on the police procedural "Dragnet" and the family comedy "Leave It to Beaver." After a short break from the industry, Idelson returned as a screenwriter after being nudged by his friend, sci-fi author Richard Matheson. His first writing credit was an auspicious one: "The Twilight Zone." Idelson co-wrote the episode "Long Distance Call," in which a young boy communicates with his dead grandmother through a toy telephone. In thoroughly creepy fashion, granny encourages the boy to kill himself. This led to other writing jobs, and Idelson continued to act while embarking on this stage of his career. His subsequent work, however, was markedly lighter than his debut: Idelson penned episodes of some of the most iconic sitcoms of the 1960s and '70s, including "The Andy Griffith Show," "Happy Days," and "M*A*S*H." In his acting career, Idelson showed up most prominently as Herman Glimscher, Sally's bumbling boyfriend, on "The Dick Van Dyke Show" but was also featured on comedy staples "My Favorite Martian" and "Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.."

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