Alain Resnais

Alain Resnais
Arguably the single most important director to emerge from the French New Wave, Alain Resnais fed his early imagination a varied diet of popular movies, pulp fiction, Proust, Katherine Mansfield and comic books, retaining throughout his career the ability to bridge the gap between high and low culture in his films. He began making 16mm documentary "art" shorts in the late 1940s, visiting the works...

Allen Ginsberg

Allen Ginsberg had no intention of taking the stage alone at San Francisco's Six Gallery on Oct. 7, 1955, but was left to represent the nascent Beat Generation when novelists Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs declined the invitation. Ginsberg's incantatory reading of his epic poem "Howl" was swiftly recognized as a milestone in the development of America's first native literary movement...

Anders Henrikson

Credits: I Lust och Nod BIRTHDATE| 06/03/1896

Anderson Cooper

Anderson Cooper
With a distinguished head of premature gray hair and a charming onscreen demeanor, newsman Anderson Cooper grabbed audience attention - and the nickname "The Silver Fox" - for his contributions to the field of journalism. The clever Cooper won far-reaching respect in an era of backlash against journalists, particularly with his emotional on-the-scene coverage of the devastation in New Orleans...

Anthony Harvey

A budding stage and screen actor who switched strides in the late 1940s, Harvey dropped out of RADA and appeared in the feature "Caesar and Cleopatra" (1945) before finding work as a film editor. He worked on a number of films directed by the Boulting brothers (e.g., "Private's Progress" 1956, "Happy Is the Bride" 1958) as well as such high profile helmers as Anthony Asquith ("On Such a Night"...

Auntie Christ

Credits: G.I. Jane BIRTHDATE| 06/03/1958

Billy Powell

Credits: Freebird... the Movie, Nighthawks BIRTHDATE| 06/03/1952

Billy Williams

Billy Williams
Cinematographer who established himself in the 1960s with his work on two Ken Russell films, "Billion Dollar Brain" (1967) and "Women in Love" (1969). Outstanding credits include his understated photography on John Schlesinger's "Sunday Bloody Sunday" (1971), his sweeping panoramic views in "The Wind and the Lion" (1974), his autumnal work on Mark Rydell's "On Golden Pond" (1981) and the...

Chuck Barris

Chuck Barris
Once lambasted by critics, who dubbed him the King of Schlock, the Baron of Bad Taste and the Ayatollah of Trasherola, television producer and game show personality Chuck Barris hammed it up as host of one of the 1970's most ridiculed programs, "The Gong Show" (ABC, 1976-1980). Operating on the basic idea that anyone will do anything to get on television - even humiliate themselves before millions...