Brandon Tartikoff

Executive, Producer
A creative and highly competitive television executive who spent nearly his entire career in network broadcasting, Brandon Tartikoff took over a flailing NBC in the early 1980s and at 31 years old became the youngest ... Read more »
Born: 01/13/1949 in New York City, New York, USA

Filmography

Actor (12)

Dave's World 1996 - 1997 (Tv Show)

Actor

Arli$$ 1996 (Tv Show)

Actor

Gail Sheehy's New Passages 1995 - 1996 (TV Show)

Actor

Good Money 1996 (Movie)

(Actor)

The Movie That Changed My Life 1994 - 1995 (TV Show)

Actor

NBC Investigates Bob Hope 1987 - 1988 (TV Show)

Actor

The Television Academy Hall of Fame 1987 - 1988 (TV Show)

Performer

NBC Presents the AFI Comedy Special 1986 - 1987 (TV Show)

Actor

America Talks Back 1985 - 1986 (TV Show)

Actor

Bob Hope Buys NBC? 1985 - 1986 (TV Show)

Actor
Producer (8)

The Online Adventures of Ozzie the Elf 1997 - 1998 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Weekly World News 1995 - 1996 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Last Call 1994 - 1995 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Q & E! 1994 - 1995 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

The Steven Banks Show 1993 - 1994 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

XXX's & OOO's 1993 - 1994 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Blade Squad (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Tom Clancy's Op Center (TV Show)

Executive Producer
Writer (2)

Beggars and Choosers 1996 - 1997, 1999 - 2001 (Tv Show)

Creator

House Party With Steve Doocy 1989 - 1990 (TV Show)

Creator
Other (2)

Second Noah 1996 - 1997, 1999 - 2001 (Tv Show)

Executive Consultant

Tapeheads 1988 (Movie)

assistance (Assistant)

Biography

A creative and highly competitive television executive who spent nearly his entire career in network broadcasting, Brandon Tartikoff took over a flailing NBC in the early 1980s and at 31 years old became the youngest president in the network's history. With such iconic series as "Hill Street Blues" (NBC, 1981-87), "Miami Vice" (NBC, 1984-89) and "The Cosby Show" (NBC, 1984-1992), Tartikoff turned the fortunes of NBC around to make it the most successful network for the ensuing two decades. In 1987, following more hits like "The Golden Girls" (1985-1992) and "L.A. Law" (1986-1994), Tartikoff simultaneously held the title of president of NBC Productions and had earned a reputation as a master of scheduling. Credited as the chief architect of the network's supremacy in primetime TV during the 1980s, he eventually left the Peacock Network in 1991 to attend to his daughter following a near-fatal car accident. Tartikoff embarked on a number of film and television endeavors, often under his own banner, while also serving briefly as the chairman of Paramount Pictures and New World Entertainment. Having twice battled Hodgkin's disease early in his life, Tartikoff finally succumbed to the cancer in 1997, leaving behind a legacy as one of television's most brilliant programming gurus.

Relationships

Lisa Rosenthal

Sister
survived him

Lilly Tartikoff

Wife
married 1982 formerly with New York City Ballet survived him

Jordan Tartikoff

Father
survived him

Enid Tartikoff

Mother
died of cancer June 30 1994 at age 67

Calla Tartikoff

Daughter
born c. 1982 suffered severe head injury in a car accident with her father January 1, 1991 survived him

Elizabeth Tartikoff

Daughter
adopted 1994 survived him

EDUCATION

The Lawrenceville School

Lawrenceville, New Jersey
boarding school; Tartikoff excelled as an athlete at baseball and fencing

Yale College, Yale University

New Haven, Connecticut 1970
graduated with honors

Milestones

1997

Named chairman of Greenhouse Networks, a content developer for America Online (March)

1996

Left New World when company was sold; later formed production company, The H. Beale Company

1994

Signed a five-year employment contract with New World, serving as chairman of New World Enterainment

1994

Sold company, Moving Target Productions, to New World Communications for a reported nine million dollars

1994

Signed a three-year first-look agreement for international disttribution with Solomon International Enterprises

1993

Became a part-time radio talk show host on WWAL-AM in New Orleans LA

1993

Began developing local TV programming in New Orleans as well as projects for the networks

1992

On October 29 resigned as chairman of Paramount Pictures (effective December 1, 1992)

1991

Accepted position of chairman of Paramount Pictures (effective July 1, 1991)

1991

Was in near-fatal car accident on January 1; daughter Calla suffered head injuries

1990

Became chairman of NBC Entertainment (July)

1989

Created TV series, "House Party With Steve Doocy"

1987

First feature produced through NBC Productions, "Square Dance"

1985

Appeared in first TV special, "Bob Hope Buys NBC?"; became SAG member

1983

Guest hosted "Saturday Night Live"

1980

Became president of NBC Entertainment

1980

Named president of West Coast programs, NBC Entertainment

1978

Appointed vice president of West Coast programs, NBC Entertainment

1977

Moved to NBC Entertainment as director of comedy programs

1976

Moved to New York as manager of dramatic development for ABC-TV

1974

First diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease

1970

Began career in promotions department of New Haven's ABC affiliate

Joined promotions staff at ABC's Chicago affiliate, WLS where he and station manager, Lew Erlicht, where among first to use and promote five-part news series

Had recurrence of Hodgkin's disease; underwent chemotherapy

Moved to New Orleans, LA, so his daughter could receive treatment

Founded own production company, NBC Productions

Bonus Trivia

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He received the Jewish National Fund's Tree of Life Award (1986)

.

He was awarded the Gordon Grand Fellowship from Yale University for distinguished service in the world of industry, business and finance.

.

He was named one of the 10 Outstanding Young Men of America by United States Jaycees (1980)

.

Tartikoff was honored as Broadcaster of the Year by the Television, Radio and Advertising Club of Philadelphia (1986)

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Tartikoff was president of the Hollywood Radio and Television Society (two terms)

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THE NEW YORK TIMES (May 2, 1991) reported that Tartikoff was "the highest-paid executive in the history of television", earning more than $2 million per year in recent years.

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