Charles Barton

Charles T. Barton spent his first two decades as an actor in stock, vaudeville and movies. He learned the production end of the business under the exacting guidance of director James Cruze, finally graduating to ... Read more »
Born: 05/24/1902 in San Francisco, CA (near)

Filmography

other (31)

Africa Screams (Movie)

(Director)

Babies for Sale (Movie)

(Director)

Beautiful But Broke (Movie)

(Director)

Buck Privates Come Home (Movie)

(Director)

Desert Gold (Movie)

(Director)

Double Crossbones (Movie)

(Director)

Five Little Peppers in Trouble (Movie)

(Director)

Free for All (Movie)

(Director)

Harmon of Michigan (Movie)

(Director)

Hell Town (Movie)

(Director)

Hello Annapolis (Movie)

(Director)

Honolulu Lu (Movie)

(Director)

Is Everybody Happy? (Movie)

(Director)

Island of Doomed Men (Movie)

(Director)

Man's World (Movie)

(Director)

Mexican Hayride (Movie)

(Director)

Nobody's Children (Movie)

(Director)

Out West with the Peppers (Movie)

(Director)

Parachute Nurse (Movie)

(Director)

Rose Bowl (Movie)

(Director)

Shut My Big Mouth (Movie)

(Director)

The Milkman (Movie)

(Director)

The Noose Hangs High (Movie)

(Producer)

The Noose Hangs High (Movie)

(Director)

The Spirit of Stanford (Movie)

(Director)

The Time of Their Lives (Movie)

(Director)

The Wistful Widow of Wagon Gap (Movie)

(Director)

Wagon Wheels (Movie)

(Director)

White Tie and Tails (Movie)

(Director)

Biography

Charles T. Barton spent his first two decades as an actor in stock, vaudeville and movies. He learned the production end of the business under the exacting guidance of director James Cruze, finally graduating to director himself with the 1934 "Zane Grey" feature Wagon Wheels. Barton became indispensable to the various "B" units operating in Hollywood, guiding several inexpensive, tight-scheduled productions with breezy efficiency. He also proved a superb comedy director, bringing the best out of such performers as Joe E. Brown, Jackie Gleason and Lupe Velez. From 1946 on, Barton was a principal director of the Abbott and Costello comedies, establishing an excellent working relationship with Lou Costello -- who, like Barton, was short in stature but long on volatility. Barton entered television in the early 1950s, helming several episodes of the classic sitcom Amos N Andy. Barton's last theatrical features included a pair of delightful Disney films, The Shaggy Dog (1959) and Toby Tyler (1960). Charles Barton was married to actress/singer Julie Gibson.

~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

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