Chuck Jones

Director, Producer, Screenwriter
As one of the chief animators and directors during the golden age of Warner Bros. animation, Chuck Jones forged a legacy as being the creator of some of the funniest and most beautifully designed cartoons ever produced ... Read more »
Born: 09/20/1912 in Spokane, Washington, USA

Filmography

Director (52)

Broom-Stick Bunny 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

Elmer's Candid Camera 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

Hair Raising Hare 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

Long-Haired Hare 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

My Favorite Duck 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

Rabbit Seasoning 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

To Duck... or Not to Duck 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

Sylvester and Tweety 1967 - 1972, 1976 - 1977, 1985 - 2000 (Tv Show)

Director

The Bugs Bunny and Tweety Show 1985 - 2000 (Tv Show)

Director

The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show 1967 - 1972, 1975 - 2000 (Tv Show)

Director

The Road Runner Show 1967 - 1972, 1985 - 2000 (Tv Show)

Director

Another Froggy Evening 1999 (Movie)

(Director)

Duck Amuck 1999 (Movie)

(Director)

One Froggy Evening 1999 (Movie)

(Director)

Wild Hare 1999 (Movie)

(Director)

Chariots of Fur 1994 (Movie)

(Director)

Daffy Duck's Quackbusters 1988 (Movie)

sequences director (Segment Director)

Porky Pig in Hollywood 1986 (Movie)

(Director)

Daffy Duck's Movie: Fantastic Island 1983 (Movie)

(Director)

Daffy Duck's Thanks-For-Giving Special 1980 - 1981 (TV Show)

Director

High Note 1981 (Movie)

(Director)

The Dot and the Line 1981 (Movie)

(Director)

Uncensored Cartoons 1980 (Movie)

(Director)

Bugs Bunny's Valentine 1978 - 1979 (TV Show)

Director

Bugs Bunny in Space 1977 - 1978 (TV Show)

Director

The Bugs Bunny Easter Special 1976 - 1977 (TV Show)

Director

Dripalong Daffy 1976 (Movie)

(Director)

Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century 1975 (Movie)

(Director)

The Cricket in Times Square 1972 - 1973 (TV Show)

Director

Deduce, You Say! 1972 (Movie)

(Director)

Dr. Seuss' Horton Hears a Who 1969 - 1970 (TV Show)

Director

The Phantom Tollbooth 1969 (Movie)

(Director)

Dr. Seuss' "How the Grinch Stole Christmas!" 1966 - 1967 (TV Show)

Director

What's Opera, Doc? 1957 (Movie)

(Director)

Operation: Rabbit 1952 (Movie)

(Director)

Mississippi Hare 1949 (Movie)

(Director)

Rabbit Hood 1949 (Movie)

(Director)

Daffy Dilly 1948 (Movie)

(Director)

Bugs Bunny's Howl-oween Special (TV Show)

Director

Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales (TV Show)

Segment Director

Happy Birthday, Bugs: 50 Looney Years (TV Show)

Segment Director

How the Grinch Stole Christmas (Movie)

(Director)

Now Hear This (Movie)

(Director)

Rikki-Tikki-Tavi (TV Show)

Director

The Bugs Bunny Mystery Special (TV Show)

Director

Yankee Doodle Cricket (TV Show)

Director
Actor (14)

Alan King: Inside the Comedy Mind 1990 - 1993 (TV Show)

Actor

The Creative Spirit 1991 - 1992 (TV Show)

Actor

The Magical World of Chuck Jones 1992 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

What's Up, Doc?: A Salute to Bugs Bunny 1990 - 1991 (TV Show)

Actor

Roger Rabbit & the Secrets of Toontown 1988 - 1989 (TV Show)

Actor

Innerspace 1987 (Movie)

Supermarket Customer (Actor)

Gremlins 1984 (Movie)

Mr Jones (Actor)

Curiosity Shop 1971 - 1973 (TV Show)

Voice

Cartoons Go to War (TV Show)

Actor
Visual Effects & Animation (11)

Beep Prepared 2014 (Movie)

(Animator)

Nelly's Folly 2014 (Movie)

(Animator)

Mrs. Doubtfire 1993 (Movie)

animation (Animator)

Stay Tuned 1992 (Movie)

("Robocat") (Animation Director)

Gremlins 2: The New Batch 1990 (Movie)

(Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck) (Animation Director)

The Dot and the Line 1981 (Movie)

(Animator)

Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny Movie 1980 (Movie)

(Animator)

Bugs Bunny Superstar 1974 (Movie)

(Animator)

Bugs Bunny: Overtures to Disaster (TV Show)

Animation Director

The Bugs Bunny Thanksgiving Diet (TV Show)

Animation Director
Producer (8)

Beep Prepared 2014 (Movie)

(Producer)

Nelly's Folly 2014 (Movie)

(Producer)

Chariots of Fur 1994 (Movie)

(Producer)

The Dot and the Line 1981 (Movie)

(Producer)

Dr. Seuss' "The Cat in the Hat" 1970 - 1971 (TV Show)

Producer

The Phantom Tollbooth 1969 (Movie)

(Producer)

How the Grinch Stole Christmas (Movie)

(Producer)
Writer (6)

Chariots of Fur 1994 (Movie)

(From Story)

Chariots of Fur 1994 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Gremlins 2: The New Batch 1990 (Movie)

animation writing (Other Writer)

The Phantom Tollbooth 1969 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Gay Purr-ee 1961 (Movie)

(Screenplay)
Art Department (1)

Extreme Ghostbusters 1997 - 1999 (TV Show)

Storyboard Artist
Other (3)

Four Rooms 1995 (Movie)

(Creative Consultant)

The Chipmunk's Christmas 1982 - 1983 (TV Show)

Creative Consultant

Peter and the Wolf (TV Show)

Executive Consultant

Biography

As one of the chief animators and directors during the golden age of Warner Bros. animation, Chuck Jones forged a legacy as being the creator of some of the funniest and most beautifully designed cartoons ever produced by the Hollywood studio system. Alongside Tex Avery, Bob Clampett and Friz Freleng, Jones spearheaded the innovative and wildly popular cartoons that populated the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies worlds. With such iconic characters as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig and Elmer Fudd, the cartoons were irreverent comedies that broke new ground and rankled future generations, which often sought to censor re-airings on television for violence and racial stereotypes. For his part, Jones was responsible for some of the most famous cartoons, directing such popular ones as "Hare-Raising Hare" (1946), "Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century" (1953), "Baby Buggy Bunny" (1954) and "What's Opera, Doc?" (1957), widely considered to be the greatest cartoon ever made. He also was the creator of several characters, including Pepe Le Pew, Wile E. Coyote and the Roadrunner. After being let go from Warner Bros. in the early 1960s, Jones revived the "Tom and Jerry" cartoons before serving as an independent producer on a number of made-for-television movies. Both unpretentious and self-conscious, Jones' animation mastery during the 1940s and 1950s was unparalleled, and cemented his place as an innovative contrarian.

Relationships

Mabel Martin Jones

Mother

Rosalind Bellante

Step-Daughter
survived him

Linda Clough

Daughter
born in 1937 heads Chuck Jones Enterprises and Linda Jones Enterprises, both devoted to producing, preserving and authenticating drawings and cels by Chuck Jones and selling them through major art galleries with Jones, presided over new animation unit established in Burbank by Warners in early 1994

Marian Dern Assistant

Wife
Married 1981 until his death Feb. 22, 2002

Peter Dern

Step-Son
survived him

Dorothy Jones Actor

Wife
Married Jan. 31, 1935 until her death February 1978 Co-wrote screenplay for animated feature "Gay Purr-ee" (1962)

Charles Jones

Father
published cookbook entitled "Fifty Ways to Serve Avocados"

Richard Jones

Brother
older

Dorothy Jones

Sister
older

Margaret Jones

Sister
older

EDUCATION

attended 10 years of night school, studying drawing with Donald Graham

dropped out of high school

Chouinard Art Institute

Pasadena , California
enrolled at age 15; graduated; school now called California Institute of the Arts

Milestones

2000

Created new cartoon character Thomas T Wolk (aka Timber Wolf) for Warner Bros. Online and the Internet site Entertaindom; with partner Stephen Fossati, created 13 short films featuring the character

2000

Was subject of TV documentary "Chuck Jones: Extremes and In-Betweens, A Life in Animation" (PBS)

1995

Served as a creative consultant on the animated title sequence of "Four Rooms", a comedy anthology feature

1995

Received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

1994

Produced and directed "Chariots of Fur", his first short under his deal at Warners (released with the feature "Richie Rich")

1994

Subject of a career retrospective at NYC's American Museum of the Moving Image entitled "Chuck Amuck: The Cartoons of Chuck Jones"

1993

Signed a deal with Warner Bros. to produce and direct animated shorts featuring "classic" (as well as possibly new) Warners characters for theatrical release

1992

Profiled in the feature-length documentary "The Magical World of Chuck Jones" directed by George Daugherty and featuring interviews with the likes of Spielberg, Dante, George Lucas, Matt Groening and Friz Freleng

1992

Served as animation director on the Robocat sequence of the comedy fantasy "Stay Tuned"

1992

"What's Opera, Doc?" selected for inclusion in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry

1990

Worked as an animation writer and director for a sequence in Dante's "Gremlins 2: The New Batch" (also made a cameo appearance)

1988

Served as an animation consultant on Robert Zemeckis' "Who Framed Roger Rabbit"

1987

Made a cameo appearance as a supermarket customer in Dante's "Innerspace"

1984

Made a cameo appearance as Mr. Jones in Joe Dante's "Gremlins"

1979

Served as an uncredited creative assistant on Steven Spielberg's "1941"

1979

Co-directed (with Phil Monroe) and co-scripted (with Michael Maltese) "The Bugs Bunny/Road-Runner Movie"

1969

Named vice president in charge of Children's Programming at ABC

1968

Feature debut as producer-director, "The Phantom Tollbooth" (also co-wrote screenplay; directed animated sequences with Abe Levitow)

1966

Named head of department

1963

Formed Tower 12 Productions (with producer Les Goldman)

1962

Established an independent production company, Chuck Jones Enterprises

1962

Feature screenwriting debut (with wife Dorothy Webster Jones), wrote screenplay for the UPA feature "Gay Purr-ee"

1957

Directed "What's Opera, Doc?", an acclaimed parodic condensation of Wagner's 14-hour "Der Ring des Nibelungen" into a classic six-minute cartoon

1955

Worked for four months at the Walt Disney Studio after Jack Warner temporarily closed the animation unit at Warner Brothers; worked uncredited on Disney's "Sleeping Beauty"

1955

Directed his most celebrated "one-shot" cartoon, "One Froggy Evening", an unsettling allegory about a singing frog

1954

Worked briefly as a gag writer at Walter Lantz Studio

1954

Left Warners for a period when Jack Warner--thinking that "3-D" would sweep the industry and drive up costs--closed the animation unit

1954

Directed the only "3-D" Warner Brothers cartoon, "Lumberjack Rabbit"

1953

Directed one of his most celebrated cartoons, "Duck Amuck", in which Daffy Duck is tormented by a (mostly) off-screen animator

1953

Directed the classic Cold War satire, "Duck Dodgers in the 24 1/2 Century", starring Daffy, Porky and the Little Man from Mars

1950

Directed and co-scripted (with Friz Freleng) "So Much for So Little", an animated documentary short on the importance of sanitation and health services commissioned by the Public Health Service; first cartoon to win the Oscar for best documentary short su

1949

Directed Pepe Le Pew in "For Scent-imental Reasons", the second Warners cartoon to win the Oscar for best animated short subject

1949

Directed the landmark cartoon "Fast and Furry-ous" which introduced the Road Runner and (subsequently named Wile E.) Coyote, his most successful Warners creations

1948

Introduced the Little Man from Mars (aka Commander X-2; aka Marvin the Martian) in "Haredevil Hare"

1946

Began his most productive era as a Warner Brothers animation director

1946

Began publishing articles on the art of animation (date approximate)

1944

Introduced the amorous French skunk Pepe Le Pew in "Odor-able Kitty"

1943

Working nights without compensation, directed "Hell Bent for Election" in support of Franklin D Roosevelt's re-election; the first full-length UPA short; worked with a crew of other moonlighters

1941

Directed "The Dover Boys", an influential Warner Brothers cartoon that influenced the style, method and timing for the acclaimed cartoons to follow from UPA (United Productions of America) in the 1940s and 50s

1941

Based the staging of his animated short "Conrad the Sailor" on the writings of Soviet filmmaker/theoretician Sergei Eisenstein

1940

Became deeply involved in the animators' strike at the Walt Disney studio

1940

Directed the third cartoon featuring the prototypical Bugs Bunny, "Elmer's Candid Camera"; most important for its revision of the character of Elmer Fudd

1939

Directed "Prest-o Change-o", the second appearance of the prototype Bugs Bunny as a magician's rabbit who bedazzles the Two Curious Puppies

1939

Introduced Sniffles, a cute little mouse, in "Naughty But Mice"; Jones' first original character

1939

Directed his first cartoon featuring Porky Pig, the patriotic "Old Glory"; marked the character's first appearance in color; notable as the studio's first completely serious cartoon

1938

Directing debut, "The Night Watchman"

1936

Shared animator credit with Clampett on "Gold Diggers of '49", the first cartoon helmed by Avery at Warner Brothers

1934

Promoted to animator

1933

Dorothy Webster obtained a job for Jones as an in-betweener at Leon Schlesinger Productions (date approximate)

1931

Hired as a cel-washer by the Ub Iwerks Studio which was then producing Flip the Frog cartoons

1930

After art school, found work in a commercial art studio

Conducted art classes for his crew

Worked as a seaman on a large schooner which caught fire

On the recommendation of Harry Bender, Schlesinger's assistant, promoted to director after Frank Tashlin left the studio

Grew up in Southern California

Collaborated with Theodor Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss) on a WWII series of instructional cartoons starring Private Snafu

Rehired by the Iwerks Studio; soon fired by Iwerks' secretary, Dorothy Webster (whom Jones would marry in 1935)

Worked successively as a cel painter, cel inker and in-betweener (assistant animator) before being fired by Iwerks

Assigned with animator Bob Clampett to director Tex Avery's unit at the bungalow nicknamed "Termite Terrace" on the Warner Brothers lot

As a child, worked as an extra in silent movies shot near his home

Briefly loaned out with Clampett to Iwerks to work as (uncredited) co-directors on two cartoons in the Gabby Goat series

Became Clampett's animator when Clampett was promoted to director

Worked briefly for producers Charles Mintz and subsequently Walter Lantz

Moved to a "bohemian" section of Los Angeles and worked as a puppeteer and portrait artist ($1 per picture)

Hired by MGM to produce a new series of Tom and Jerry cartoons

Tower 12 Productions absorbed by MGM and renamed MGM Animation/Visual Arts Department

Bonus Trivia

.

Jones was billed as Charles M. Jones until the mid-1950s.

.

"These cartoons were never made for children. Nor were they made for adults. They were made for ME." --Chuck Jones, quoted in "Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons" by Leonard Maltin (NY: Plume, 1987).

.

"All that I am and all that I hope to be, I owe to Chuck Jones!" --Theodor Geisel aka Dr. Seuss (from a signed drawing included in "Chuck Amuck")

.

Jones and Dr. Seuss collaborated on two animated TV specials entitled "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (CBS, 1966) and "Horton Hears a Who" (CBS, 1970) which won the Peabody Award for Television Programming Excellence.

.

"The difference between what we did at Warner Bros. and what's on Saturday morning is the difference between animation and what I call illustrated radio. For Saturday morning, they make a full radio track and then use as few drawings as possible in front of it.""The best way to tell the difference is this: if you can turn off the picture and know what's going on, that's illustrated radio. But if you can turn off the sound and know what's going on, that's animation." --Chuck Jones (Quoted in "That's All Folks!: The Art of Warner Bros. Animation" by Steve Scheider (NY: Henry Holt & Co., 1988)

.

"In 1962 I established my own independent production company, Chuck Jones Enterprises. Chuck Jones Enterprises produced nine half-hour prime-time television specials, all produced, written, and directed by me. They are: "The Cricket in Times Square", "A Very Merry Cricket", and "Yankee Doodle Cricket" (for ABC); three stories from Rudyard Kipling's "The Jungle Book"--"Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", "Mowgli's Brothers" (both of which received the Parents' Choice Awards in 1985) and "The White Seal" (for CBS); two specials populated by some of the classic characters from Warner Bros., "Carnival of the Animals" ... and "A Connecticut Rabbit in King Arthur's Court" ... Both were aired on CBS. Also for CBS: "Raggedy Ann and Andy in: The Great Santa Claus Caper", and "The Pumpkin Who Couldn't Smile" ..." --From "Chuck Amuck" by Chuck Jones (NY: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1989)

.

Jones is a Regents Lecturer at the University of California at La Jolla and Visiting Lecturer at Cambridge University, England, and Guardian Lecturer in England.

.

Jones has lectured and conducted workshops at Stanford University, the University of Kansas, the University of Iowa, Johns Hopkins, the Universities of California and Nevada, San Francisco State College, Art Center Ccollege of Design in Pasadena, Cal Arts, USC, UCLA, and many others.

.

The University of California at Santa Cruz offered an accredited course on the films of Chuck Jones, under the direction of Tim Hunter.

.

Jones has been honored with a three-day retrospective at London's British Film Institute, twice at the Kennedy Film Center and by the American Film Institute. He has also received tributes in Toronto, Zagreb and Montreal.

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"I don't want to criticize. I'm SORRY that people who are as good as Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera once were are not doing the kinds of things they are capable of. I'm sorry that Friz [Freleng] isn't doing the kinds of things he's capable of. I'm sorry I'm not, for that matter, but at least I'm not doing that kind of crap."--From "Chuck Jones Interviewed" by Joe Adamson in "The American Animated Cartoon: A Critical Anthology", edited by Gerald Peary and Danny Peary (NY: E.P. Dutton, 1980).

.

"Perhaps the most accurate remark about me was uttered by Ray Bradbury at his fifty-fifth birthday party. In answer to the usual question: 'What do you want to be when you grow up?' Ray replied: 'I want to be fourteen years old like Chuck Jones.'""Perhaps this will be my most apt possible epitaph."--From "Chuck Amuck" by Chuck Jones.

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