Dante Ferretti

Production designer, Stage designer, Art director
A noted art director who became established in the Italian film industry before branching out into European co-productions and eventually landing in Hollywood, Dante Ferretti designed four films for Pier Paolo Pasolini ... Read more »
Born: 02/26/1943 in Macerata, IT

Filmography

Art Department (51)

Cinderella 2015 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Seventh Son 2015 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Hugo 2011 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Shutter Island 2010 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street 2007 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

The Black Dahlia 2006 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

The Aviator 2004 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Cold Mountain 2003 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Gangs of New York 2002 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Bringing Out the Dead 1999 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Titus 1999 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Meet Joe Black 1998 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Kundun 1997 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Casino 1995 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Interview With the Vampire 1994 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

The Age of Innocence 1993 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Lo Zio Indegno 1991 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Docteur M. 1990 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Hamlet 1990 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

The Voice of the Moon 1990 (Movie)

(Set Designer)

The Voice of the Moon 1990 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

La Nuit de Varennes 1989 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen 1989 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Ginger et Fred 1986 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Ginger et Fred 1986 (Movie)

set design (Set Designer)

The Name of the Rose 1986 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

E la nave Va 1984 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Desiderio 1983 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Il Futuro e Donna 1983 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Le Bon Roi Dagobert 1983 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Pianoforte 1983 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Tales of Ordinary Madness 1983 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Oltre la Porta 1981 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Till Marriage Do Us Part 1981 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

La Pelle 1980 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Il Minestrone 1979 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

La Citta Delle Donne 1979 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Eutanasia di un amore 1977 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Il Gatto 1977 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Prova d'Orchestra 1977 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Salo or the 120 Days of Sodom 1976 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Delitto d'Amore 1973 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Il Fiore Delle Mille e Una Notte 1973 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Mio Dio, come sono Caduta in Basso 1973 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

I Racconti di Canterbury 1971 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

La Classe Operaia Va In Paradise 1971 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Sbatti Il Mostro In Prima Pagina 1971 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Fellini Satyricon 1970 (Movie)

(Assistant Art Director)

Il Decamerone 1970 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Anzio 1968 (Movie)

art direction assistant (Assistant Art Director)

Sons of Satan 1968 (Movie)

(Set Decorator)
Actor (2)

Fellini 2000 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Biography

A noted art director who became established in the Italian film industry before branching out into European co-productions and eventually landing in Hollywood, Dante Ferretti designed four films for Pier Paolo Pasolini ("The Decameron" 1971; "The Canterbury Tales" 1972; "The Arabian Nights" 1974; and "Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom" 1975) and five for Federico Fellini ("Orchestra Rehearsal" 1978; "City of Women" 1980; "And the Ship Sails On" 1983; "Ginger and Fred" 1986; and "The Voice of the Moon" 1990). Ferretti moved effortlessly from the down and dirty realism of the former to the dreamy artifice of the latter. He also worked with other major names in Italian filmmaking including Elio Petri, Marco Bellocchio, Liliana Cavani and Luigi Comencini. Ferretti's later international credits include Jean-Jacques Annaud's 13th-century mystery "The Name of the Rose" (1986), Terry Gilliam's fantasy extravaganza "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" (1989), and Franco Zeffirelli's "Hamlet" (1990), the latter two earning him back-to-back Best Art Direction Oscar nominations.

EDUCATION

University of Architecture and Fine Arts

Milestones

2010

Provided production design on Martin Scorsese thriller "Shutter Island"

2007

Art director for Tim Burton's "Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street"; earned seventh Oscar nomination for Art Direction

2004

Reunited with Scorsese as the Production Designer for "The Aviator"

2002

Fifth film with Scorsese, "The Gangs of New York"; the film depicted the dark days of Boss Tweed in mid-1800s NYC; Ferretti constructed a period Gotham at Cinecitta Studios in Rome; received BAFTA and Oscar nomination for Production Design

1999

Reunited with Scorsese for "Bringing out the Dead"

1999

Provided production design for theater director Julie Taymor's feature directorial debut, "Titus"

1998

Provided production design for Martin Brest's "Meet Joe Black"; designs were unprecedented in terms of sets built on a NYC soundstage

1997

Third feature collaboration with Scorsese, "Kundun"; a biopic of the Dalai Lama; earned Oscar nominations for Best Art Direction and Best Costume Design; first screen credit as costume designer

1995

Reteamed with Scorsese for "Casino"

1994

Received fourth Best Art Direction Oscar nomination for his work on Neil Jordan's "Interview With the Vampire"

1993

American feature debut, "The Age of Innocence"; directed by Martin Scorsese and written by Jay Cocks; garnered third Academy Award nomination for Best Art Direction

1990

Last of five feature collaborations with Fellini, "The Voice of the Moon"; Fellini's last film

1990

Received second Best Art Direction Oscar nomination for "Hamlet", directed by Franco Zeffirelli

1989

Earned first Academy Award nomination for Best Art Direction for Terry Gilliam's "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen"

1986

Served as production designer on Jean-Jacques Annaud's "The Name of the Rose"

1982

Fourth and last collbaration with Comencini, "Till Marriage Do Us Part"

1978

First collaboration with director Federico Fellini, "Prova d' Orchestra/Orchestra Rehearsal"

1975

Last collaboration with Pasolini, "Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom"

1974

First film as art director with director Luigi Comencini, "Delitto d'Amore"

1970

Served as art director for Pasolini's "The Decameron"

1969

First film as art director, "Medea"

1967

Worked on Pier Paolo Pasolini's "Oedipus Rex"

Decided he wanted to design movies at age 12

Began career as an assistant production designer in the Italian film industry

Designed the operas "Tosca" and "La Fanciulla del West" in Buenos Aires and "Manon Lascaut" in Italy for director Piero Faggioni

Bonus Trivia

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On his designs for "Interview With the Vampire": "When I came to New Orleans for the first time, I found all the old buildings not in the city - well, some in the French Quarter, but in the outlying county and plantation homes. I had to rebuild all the waterfront, with the wharfs, and a section of the city. We changed the French Quarter back to wood, because the French Quarter today is iron. I also built a swamp. You can't believe it: we went to New Orleans, which is surrounded by swamp, and I built a new swamp in the studio! For effects, like sunrise, it was better to shoot on the stage because you have more control of the look. Also, we did a lot of matte painting in combination with computers, but it's not a special effects film. Phillippe Rousselot did fantastic lighting to make it look like a painting. Of this I'm proud, because sometimes when you do this kind of film it looks like computer stuff. This looks like a hand-made film." - Ferretti quoted in Imagi-Movies, Winter 1994

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About Scorsese's "Kundun": "I did have a very low budget, but Morocco is not a very expensive place. This is the kind of movie where the audience has to believe they are actually in Tibet, so we built everything as real as possible. We used real flagstones for the floors of the sets, and I went to a factory in India to get the type of brocade, silk and fabric normally bought by Tibetan people. To do the construction, we hired a lot of Moroccan carpenters, plasterers and sculptors who did everything the old-fashioned way. Sometimes we had as many as 300 people working at once, but their fees were very low. There would have been no way to do it otherwise, because we had to build the big sets in about 14 weeks. I had very good technical advisors. Namgyal Takla, the widow of the Dalai Lama's brother, helped with the costume research, and I even had meetings with the Dalai Lama himself." - Ferretti to American Cinematographer, February 1998

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