David Lee

A TV writer-producer boasting a consistent involvement with long-running sitcoms, David Lee got his start penning episodes for the cultural milestone "The Jeffersons". By the mid-1980s, Lee and "Jeffersons" co-scribe ... Read more »

Filmography

Actor (20)

Cop on a Mission 2014 (Movie)

Chung (Actor)

CSI: Miami 2007 (Tv Show)

Actor

Drake & Josh: Really Big Shrimp 2006 - 2007 (TV Show)

Actor

Monk 2007 (Tv Show)

Actor

Angel 2004 (Tv Show)

Actor

Las Vegas 2004 (Tv Show)

Actor

Fastlane 2003 (Tv Show)

Actor

From the Queen to the Chief Executive 2000 (Movie)

Cheung Yau-Ming--'Ming' (Actor)

Wode Xiongdi Jiemei 2000 (Movie)

(Actor)

Baulit yingging 1999 (Movie)

(Actor)

Martial Law 1998 - 1999 (Tv Show)

Actor

Muk lo hung kwong 1998 (Movie)

(Actor)

Return to Paradise 1998 (Movie)

(Voice)

Fatal Justice 1992 (Movie)

(Actor)

To the Death 1992 (Movie)

7th Guard (Actor)

Nightsongs 1991 (Movie)

Fung Tak Men (Actor)

Renegades 1989 (Movie)

Gangbanger (Actor)

Mr. Universe 1986 (Movie)

(Actor)

Year of the Dragon 1985 (Movie)

Dragon King (Actor)

Nashville Beat (TV Show)

Actor

Biography

A TV writer-producer boasting a consistent involvement with long-running sitcoms, David Lee got his start penning episodes for the cultural milestone "The Jeffersons". By the mid-1980s, Lee and "Jeffersons" co-scribe Peter Casey formed a successful partnership that led to a joint gig on "Cheers", their second consecutive landmark series together and the one on which they met the third member of their alliance, fellow writer David Angell. Although Lee and his cohorts were instrumental in developing an entire ensemble of bartenders and patrons native to "Cheers"'s Chicago pub of the title, one character in particular, Dr. Frasier Crane (Kelsey Grammer), inspired the trio to extend his fictional life well beyond the show's many seasons. In 1993, Lee, Casey, and Angell co-created "Frasier", a spin-off sitcom in which the charmingly fuddy-duddy psychologist found himself transplanted back to his hometown of Seattle. While the show's erudite persnicketiness connected with audiences for 11 seasons, Lee and his partners demonstrated a capacity for a different kind of appeal with their semi-synchronous creation, "Wings". The airport-set sitcom never quite attained the critical acclaim of "Frasier" but is often remembered (and ribbed) in pop-culture consciousness as an airy pleasure. In addition to writing and producing, Lee has stepped into the director's chair on several occasions, helming episodes of "Wings", "Frasier", and "Everybody Loves Raymond".

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