Dominique Douret

Starting out in 1990 as the art director on the French segments of Robert Altman's Van Gogh biopic, "Vincent & Theo", Dominique Douret reinforced his reputation for period detail with the 1960s family drama " demain" ... Read more »

Filmography

Art Department (10)

Days of Glory 2006 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Days of Glory 2006 (Movie)

(Set Designer)

People 2004 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Marie-Line 2000 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Stand-By 2000 (Movie)

(Production Designer)

Une Journee de Merde 1999 (Movie)

(Art Director)

A Self-Made Hero 1997 (Movie)

(Set Designer)

Ca n'empeche pas les sentiments 1997 (Movie)

(Art Director)

Nuit et jour 1992 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)

Vincent & Theo 1990 (Movie)

art direction(France) (Art Director)
Actor (1)

Code Unknown 2001 (Movie)

David (Actor)

Biography

Starting out in 1990 as the art director on the French segments of Robert Altman's Van Gogh biopic, "Vincent & Theo", Dominique Douret reinforced his reputation for period detail with the 1960s family drama "À demain" and Jacques Audiard's dissection of wartime valour, "A Self-Made Hero". He debuted as a production designer on Chantal Akerman's 1991 Parisian ménage drama "Nuit et jour" and remained in contemporary mode for Robert Guédiguian's Marseille comedy "L'Argent fait le bonheur", Marion Vernoux's road movie "Personne ne m'aime" and Jean-Pierre Jackson's kitschy Breton bromance "Feelings Needn't Get in the Way". Following a stint on the TV series "H", Douret took his sole acting role in Michael Haneke's 2000 ensemble drama "Code Unknown" before returning to the day job on the absurdist body part comedy "Highway Melody", the poignant Orly Airport drama "Stand-by" and the gritty slice of social realism "Marie-Line". Following a couple of collaborations with Jean-Paul Mocky on the anarchic comedies "The Ferret" and "Grabuge!", Douret headed for Ibiza for the party romp "People: Jet Set 2" before settling into the Quai des Orfévres cop series "La Crim'". However, he returned to movies to recreate the route from Algeria to Alsace followed by a unit of Arab volunteers in Rachid Bouchareb's masterly World War II drama, "Days of Glory" (2006), and the North African locations where France conducted its nuclear tests in the 1950s in Jean-Paul Sinapi's teleplay "Vive la bombe!".

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