Dorothy Gish

Actor
Though not as popular or successful as her older sister, actress Dorothy Gish nonetheless enjoyed a good run in the silent era as a pert and talented leading lady who seemed most at home in comedy. Gish made a number of ... Read more »
Born: 03/10/1898 in Dayton, Ohio, USA

Filmography

Actor (12)

The Cardinal 1963 (Movie)

Celia (Actor)

Philco Television Playhouse 1948 - 1956 (TV Show)

Actor

Judith of Bethulia 1912 (Movie)

Crippled Beggar (Actor)

The Informer 1911 (Movie)

(Actor)

The Musketeers of Pig Alley 1911 (Movie)

(Actor)

Atta Boy's Last Race (Movie)

(Actor)

Centennial Summer (Movie)

Harriet Rogers (Actor)

Flying Pat (Movie)

(Actor)

Nell Gwyn (Movie)

Nell Gwyn (Actor)

Orphans of the Storm (Movie)

Louise Girard (Actor)

Our Hearts Were Young and Gay (Movie)

Mrs. Otis Skinner (Actor)

Romola (Movie)

Tessa (Actor)

Biography

Though not as popular or successful as her older sister, actress Dorothy Gish nonetheless enjoyed a good run in the silent era as a pert and talented leading lady who seemed most at home in comedy. Gish made a number of pictures with her sister and director D.W. Griffith, starting with "An Unseen Enemy" (1912), before having her big breakthrough role in the World War I epic, "Hearts of the World" (1918). After signing a contract with Paramount Pictures that same year, Gish starred in a string of successful films that made her one of the top comic performers in Hollywood. She made her last film with her sister and Griffith in the epic "Orphans of the Storm" (1922), and moved to England in the mid-1920s to make her final silent-era films, including the international hit "Nell Gywnn" (1926). Gish made the transition to talkies with "Wolves" (1930), but stepped away from movies for 14 years to perform on the stage. She returned to pictures as a character actress in "Our Hearts Were Young and Gay" (1944) and "Centennial Summer" (1946), and made her last movie "The Cardinal" (1963), before succumbing to ill health. Though overshadowed by her sister, Gish was certainly remembered as a popular star in her own right.

Relationships

Louis Calhern Actor

Companion
after affair had ended, acted together on Broadway in "The Magnificent Yankee"

James Gish

Father
born c. 1875 alcoholic separated from family died in 1912

Lillian Gish Actor

Sibling
acted together in many films including their first, "An Unseen Enemy" (1912), and "Orphans of the Storm" (1921) Older born on October 14, 1893 died on February 27, 1993

Robert Harron Actor

Companion
appeared together in films

Mary McConnell

Mother
born in September 1876 died in 1948

James Rennie Actor

Husband
Eloped December 26, 1920 divorced in 1935 over his alcoholism

Milestones

1963

Final film, "The Cardinal"

1956

Last stage play with sister, "The Chalk Garden

1946

Enjoyed a stage success in "The Magnificent Yankee", opposite Louis Calhern

1943

Return to films after 14 years onstage, "Our Hearts Were Young and Gay"

1930

First talking film, "Wolves"; last film for 14 years

1925

Starred opposite Lillian in "Romola"

1923

Featured in "Fury", directed by Henry King

1922

Last film with Griffith and her sister, "Orphans of the Storm"

1920

Starred in and co-wrote (with sister Lillian) "Remodeling Her Husband", directed by Lillian Gish

1914

Featured in Griffith's "Judith of Bethulia"

1912

Acted with Biograph, Majestic-Mutual and Fine Arts studios

1912

Film acting debut, "An Unseen Enemy"; sister Lillian also featured

1912

Teamed with Lillian in "The Musketeers of Pig Alley", directed by D.W. Griffith

1902

Stage debut in stock

Concentrated on stage acting career

Moved to London; appeared in "Nell Gwyn" (1926), "London" (1927) and "Madame Pompadour" (1929), among other films

Signed with Paramount

Bonus Trivia

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"I have a crooked face. I always think of myself as a squirrel, with two nuts stored in one cheek, and only one in the other." --Dorothy Gish, quoted in undated newspaper article.

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"You miss the old feeling. Making movies used to be fun. A medium is always more fun when it's new." --Dorothy Gish, quoted in newspaper interview, c. 1950.

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