Douglas Slocombe

Director of photography, Journalist, Still photographer
A celebrated English cinematographer, Douglas Slocombe received his training as both a photo-journalist and as a newsreel cameraman during WWII, filming the German invasion of Poland and Holland. After the war, he ... Read more »
Born: 02/09/1913 in London, England, GB

Filmography

Camera, Film, & Tape (56)

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade 1989 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Lady Jane 1986 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Water 1986 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom 1984 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Never Say Never Again 1983 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Pirates of Penzance 1983 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Raiders of the Lost Ark 1981 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Nijinsky 1980 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Lost and Found 1979 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Caravans 1978 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Lady Vanishes 1978 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Julia 1977 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Nasty Habits 1977 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Hedda 1975 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Rollerball 1975 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Bawdy Adventures of Tom Jones 1975 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

That Lucky Touch 1974 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With the Sea 1974 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Jesus Christ Superstar 1973 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Destructors 1973 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Great Gatsby 1973 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Maids 1973 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Travels With My Aunt 1972 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Murphy's War 1971 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Music Lovers 1970 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Buttercup Chain 1969 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Italian Job 1969 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Boom! 1968 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Lion in Winter 1968 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Robbery 1967 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Fathom 1966 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Promise Her Anything 1966 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Blue Max 1966 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Fearless Vampire Killers 1966 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

A High Wind in Jamaica 1965 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Guns at Batasi 1964 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The L-Shaped Room 1963 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Third Secret 1963 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Freud 1962 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Servant 1962 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Mark 1961 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Boy Who Stole a Million 1960 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

All at Sea 1957 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Smallest Show on Earth 1956 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Lavender Hill Mob 1951 (Movie)

cinematography (Cinematographer)

The Man in the White Suit 1950 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

It Always Rains on Sunday 1949 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Kind Hearts and Coronets 1949 (Movie)

(Photography)

Dance Hall (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Fathom (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Hue and Cry (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Love Among the Ruins (TV Show)

Director of Photography

Saraband for Dead Lovers (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

The Captive Heart (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

The Titfield Thunderbolt (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Tread Softly Stranger (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Biography

A celebrated English cinematographer, Douglas Slocombe received his training as both a photo-journalist and as a newsreel cameraman during WWII, filming the German invasion of Poland and Holland. After the war, he joined Ealing Studios, where unlike many directors of photography he did not rise through the ranks. Slocombe used his newsreel training to basically learn on the job, shooting such acclaimed films as "Kind Hearts and Coronets" (1949), "The Lavender Hill Mob" (1952) and "The Man in the White Suit" (1955). For much of his career, he worked with the same camera operator, Chic Waterson. An elegant craftsman whose trademark was the detail of his shots, Slocombe later contributed to landmark British features of the 1960s including "The L-Shaped Room" (1962) and Joseph Losey's "The Servant" (1963).

For John Huston's "Freud" (1962), Slocombe had to work in five distinct styles to represent what was occurring onscreen: there was the strict narrative, a distinct style for flashbacks, one for dream sequences, another for nightmares and yet another for memories. His extraordinary success was honored with a British Academy Award. Despite his excellent, crisp work on such efforts as "The Lion in Winter" (1968), Slocombe earned his first Oscar nomination for "Travels With My Aunt" (1972). He brought to life the Roaring Twenties in Jack Clayton's "The Great Gatsby" (1974) and earned a second Academy nod for "Julia" (1977). That same year, he began an association with wunderkind Steven Spielberg, shooting additional footage in India for "Close Encounters of the Third Kind". While Slocombe did fine work for other (sometimes mediocre) films, some of his best work was for Spielberg's Indiana Jones trilogy. He garnered his third Academy Award nomination for "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981) and went on to bring a unified look to the sequels "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (1984) and his last feature "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" (1989).

Relationships

George Slocombe

Father
based in Paris managed to interview both Hitler and Mussolini was also instrumental in obtaining the release of Gandhi from jail

EDUCATION

educated in Paris, France

Milestones

1989

Last feature credit, "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade", directed by Spielberg

1986

Shot Trevor Nunn's "Lady Jane"

1984

Was cinematographer on the second installment of the trilogy "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom", directed by Spielberg

1983

Shot the James Bond film "Never Say Never Again"

1981

Was director of photography on Spielberg's "Raiders of the Lost Ark"; garnered third Oscar nomination

1977

First collaboration with Steven Spielberg, additional photography on India sequences of "Close Encounters of the Third Kind"

1977

Received second Academy Award nomination for his work on "Julia", helmed by Fred Zinnemann

1974

Won praise for his lush cinematographic work on "The Great Gatsby"

1972

Earned Oscar nomination for "Travels with My Aunt"

1970

Worked with Ken Russell on "The Music Lovers"

1967

Shot Roman Polanski's "The Fearless Vampire Killers"

1962

Won particular attention for his work on "Freud", directed by John Huston

1952

Was cinematographer for "The Lavender Hill Mob"

1949

Served as director of photography on "Kind Hearts and Coronets"

1944

Shot first film, "Dead of Night"

1944

Director of photography at Ealing Studios

1933

Returned to England

Began film career as newsreel cameraman during WWII

Raised in France

Worked as a photo-journalist at Paris Match, Life and other magazines

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