Ed Jurist

Television pioneer Ed Jurist majored in Theater at the University of Michigan before beginning his career in 1949, writing and directing one of the first sitcoms, "The Aldrich Family", adapted from the popular radio ... Read more »
Born: 04/08/1916

Filmography

Writer (13)

Small Wonder 1985 - 1992 (TV Show)

Writer

The Adventures of Superboy 1988 - 1992 (TV Show)

Writer

Born to Run 1988 - 1989 (TV Show)

Writer

Gimme a Break 1981 - 1987 (TV Show)

Writer

Diff'rent Strokes 1978 - 1986 (TV Show)

Writer

M*A*S*H 1972 - 1983 (TV Show)

Writer

Tabitha 1975 - 1976 (TV Show)

Writer

These Are the Days 1974 - 1976 (TV Show)

Story By

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kids 1973 - 1974 (TV Show)

Story By

Bewitched 1964 - 1972 (TV Show)

Writer

The Patty Duke Show 1963 - 1966 (TV Show)

Writer

The Cara Williams Show 1964 - 1965 (TV Show)

Writer

The Aldrich Family 1949 - 1953 (TV Show)

Writer
Producer (2)

The Flying Nun 1967 - 1970 (TV Show)

Producer

Hawaiian Eye 1959 - 1963 (TV Show)

Producer

Biography

Television pioneer Ed Jurist majored in Theater at the University of Michigan before beginning his career in 1949, writing and directing one of the first sitcoms, "The Aldrich Family", adapted from the popular radio series of the '40s. In '53, he moved on to the comedies "Colonel Humphrey Flack" starring Alan Mowbray, and "The Betty Hutton Show". During the late '50s, Jurist was implicated in one of the notorious "quiz show" scandals. As one of the producers of "Dotto", Jurist acknowledged that he and his fellow producers had coached the contestants, stating, "You cannot ask random questions of people and have a show. You simply have failure...and that does not make entertainment." In the early '60s, Jurist wrote for the detective series "Hawaiian Eye" and "77 Sunset Strip" and produced the sticom "Room for One More". In addition to writing episodes of "My Three Sons", "The Patty Duke Show", and the long-running "Bewitched", Jurist produced and wrote for "The Flying Nun", starring Sally Field, from '68 to '70. In the '70s and '80s, Jurist's television history made him a valued story consultant and writer on many hit series of the era, including "M.A.S.H.", "Diff'rent Strokes", "One Day at a Time", and "Gimme a Break!". Jurist worked on his last series, the stcom "Small Wonder", in '85, and died in Hollywood, from heart failure, in '93.

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