Elinor Glyn

Screenwriter, Director, Novelist
Elinor Glyn scandalized Edwardian Britain in the early 1900s as both a notorious jezebel and a trailblazer of erotic literature before becoming an engine of overwrought romance in silent-era Hollywood. Descended from ... Read more »
Born: 10/17/1864 in Jersey, England, GB

Filmography

Actor (1)

Show People 1927 (Movie)

(Actor)

Biography

Elinor Glyn scandalized Edwardian Britain in the early 1900s as both a notorious jezebel and a trailblazer of erotic literature before becoming an engine of overwrought romance in silent-era Hollywood. Descended from British aristocracy, Glyn sought escape from a boilerplate, passionless marriage by engaging in a series of torrid affairs and penning romance novels about similarly afflicted heroines. In 1907, she achieved real notoriety upon the publication of <I>Three Weeks</I>, a novel whose fictionalization of one of her own dalliances anticipated the moralist shock over D.H. Lawrence's <I>Lady Chatterley's Lover</I> two decades earlier. In 1920, she made the move to Hollywood where her work gave rise to a run of silent films, most famously the Gloria Swanson/Rudolph Valentino melodrama "Beyond the Rocks" (1924) and the Clara Bow-starring "happy-flapper" romp "It," which redefined that word as a term for cultural bellwether. Glyn fell in with the "It" crowd of her times, including the retinue of William Randolph Hearst, whose newspapers she wrote for. When her Hollywood days ended, she directed two U.K. adaptations of her stories, which made her one of the first women to helm a film - albeit unsuccessfully. A pioneer in women's fiction and a major catalyst in defining the romance template of early Hollywood, Glyn's unflinching sojourns into illicit romance made her, in her time, a pop-cultural synonym for ribaldry.

Relationships

Juliet Glyn

Daughter

Margot Glyn

Daughter

Clayton Glyn

Husband
married from 1892 until his death in 1915

Lucy Gordon

Sister

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