Fay Kanin

Screenwriter, Playwright, Actor
A celebrated screenwriter and playwright, Fay Kanin began working in Hollywood in the early 1940s in collaboration with her screenwriter husband, Michael Kanin, before branching out on her own in the late 1960s to ... Read more »
Born: 05/09/1917 in New York City, New York, USA

Filmography

Writer (7)

The Outrage 1963 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Outrage 1963 (Movie)

("Rashomon") (Play as Source Material)

Teacher's Pet 1958 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Opposite Sex 1956 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Rhapsody 1954 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Heat of Anger (TV Show)

Screenplay

My Pal Gus (Movie)

(Screenwriter)
Actor (6)

Rich and Famous 1981 (Movie)

Professor Fields (Actor)

A Double Life (Movie)

Guy Bates Post ["othello" Sequence] (Actor)

On Cukor (TV Show)

Actor

Tell Me Where It Hurts (TV Show)

Actor
Producer (4)

Friendly Fire (TV Show)

Co-Producer

Fun and Games (TV Show)

Producer

Heartsounds (TV Show)

Producer

Hustling (TV Show)

Associate Producer

Biography

A celebrated screenwriter and playwright, Fay Kanin began working in Hollywood in the early 1940s in collaboration with her screenwriter husband, Michael Kanin, before branching out on her own in the late 1960s to become an Emmy-winning TV writer. After starting with "Sunday Punch" (1942), Kanin and her husband began to take off in the early 1950s with scripts for star vehicles like "My Pal Gus" (1952) starring Richard Widmark and "Rhapsody" (1953) for Elizabeth Taylor. They went on to write the romantic comedy "The Opposite Sex" (1956) and earned an Oscar nomination for "Teacher's Pet" (1958), starring Clark Gable and Doris Day. In between Hollywood scripts, they wrote Broadway plays like the 1959 stage adaptation of Akira Kurasawa's "Rashomon," which they adapted for the screen as "The Outrage" (1964). With Michael stepping back from his Hollywood career, Kanin moved over to the small screen and won Emmys for the television movies "Tell Me Where it Hurts" (CBS, 1974) and "Friendly Fire" (ABC, 1979). Also in 1979, Kanin became the second woman behind Bette Davis to be elected president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, a post she served in until 1983. Though she stopped writing for the screen in 1984, Kanin remained heavily active in promoting film preservation and maintaining a strong influence inside the Academy.

Relationships

Michael Kanin Screenplay

Husband
Introduced by a mutual friend while she was acting in Irwin Shaw's "Bury the Dead" Married April 6, 1940 until his death March 12, 1993

Joel Kanin

Son
Born 1945; father, Michael Kanin Died 1958

Josh Kanin Assistant Editor

Son
Born 1950; father, Michael Kanin

Garson Kanin Director

Brother-In-Law

EDUCATION

Elmira College

Elmira , New York

University of Southern California

Los Angeles , California

Milestones

2007

Sat on the Academy's Board of Governors

1999

Served as vice president of the Academy's Board of Trustees

1985

Wrote book for short-lived Broadway musical "Grind," directed by Harold Prince

1984

Produced "Heartsounds" (ABC), starring Mary Tyler Moore and James Garner; also adapted screenplay from Martha Weinman Lear's book

1980

Formed partnership with Lillian Gallo; produced "Fun and Games"

1979

Wrote and co-produced "Friendly Fire"

1979

Served as President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

1974

Wrote award-winning TV-movie, "Tell Me Where It Hurts"

1972

Wrote first original TV movie "Heat of Anger" (CBS)

1959

With husband, adapted Akira Kurasawa's "Rashomon" for Broadway play of the same name

1958

Co-wrote "Teacher's Pet" with husband

1949

Had play "Goodbye My Fancy" produced on Broadway

1947

Acted in "A Double Life," written by brother-in-law Garson Kanin and his wife Ruth Gordon

1941

Co-wrote "Sunday Punch" with husband Michael Kanin and Allen Rivkin

1941

Contributed story for "Blondie for Victory"

Bonus Trivia

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Kanin served as President of the Film Preservation Board in Washington, DC.

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