Fred Zinnemann

Director, Producer, Assistant director
Arguably the most successful German expatriate filmmaker in Hollywood after Billy Wilder, director Fred Zinnemann won two Academy Awards for "From Here to Eternity" (1953) and "A Man for All Seasons" (1966), while ... Read more »
Born: 04/29/1907 in Austria

Filmography

Director (22)

Five Days One Summer 1981 (Movie)

(Director)

Julia 1977 (Movie)

(Director)

The Day of the Jackal 1973 (Movie)

(Director)

A Man For All Seasons 1966 (Movie)

(Director)

Behold a Pale Horse 1964 (Movie)

(Director)

The Sundowners 1960 (Movie)

(Director)

The Nun's Story 1958 (Movie)

(Director)

A Hatful of Rain 1957 (Movie)

(Director)

Oklahoma! 1955 (Movie)

(Director)

From Here to Eternity 1953 (Movie)

(Director)

High Noon 1952 (Movie)

(Director)

The Member Of The Wedding 1952 (Movie)

(Director)

Benjy 1951 (Movie)

(Director)

Act of Violence 1948 (Movie)

(Director)

The Search 1948 (Movie)

(Director)

Eyes in the Night (Movie)

(Director)

Kid Glove Killer (Movie)

(Director)

My Brother Talks to Horses (Movie)

(Director)

Teresa (TV Show)

Director

The Member of the Wedding (Movie)

(Director)

The Men (Movie)

(Director)

The Seventh Cross (Movie)

(Director)
Actor (6)

As I See It 1996 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Montgomery Clift: His Place in the Sun 1989 - 1990 (TV Show)

Actor

Strand: Under the Dark Cloth 1988 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

George Stevens: A Filmmaker's Journey 1985 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Hands Up! 1967 (Movie)

(Actor)

All Quiet on the Western Front 1930 (Movie)

(Actor)
Producer (4)

Five Days One Summer 1981 (Movie)

(Producer)

A Man For All Seasons 1966 (Movie)

(Producer)

Behold a Pale Horse 1964 (Movie)

(Producer)

The Sundowners 1960 (Movie)

(Producer)
Art Department (1)

Ressisim 1988 (Movie)

art direction (Art Director)
Other (1)

Menschen am Sonntag 1928 (Movie)

(Production Assistant)

Biography

Arguably the most successful German expatriate filmmaker in Hollywood after Billy Wilder, director Fred Zinnemann won two Academy Awards for "From Here to Eternity" (1953) and "A Man for All Seasons" (1966), while helming such classic films as "The Search" (1948), "High Noon" (1952), "The Nun's Story" (1959) and "The Day of the Jackal" (1973) among others. His films were celebrated for their exacting sense of realism, a technique he had adopted from working with documentarian Robert Flaherty, as well as their adventurous casting and numerous acting discoveries. Such legendary stars as Montgomery Clift and Shirley Jones received their start under Zimmermann, while Frank Sinatra and Donna Reed claimed Oscars for playing solidly against type in "From Here to Eternity." After claiming his second Oscar for "A Man for All Seasons," Zinnemann experienced a lengthy dry spell following an expensive and failed attempt to bring the novel Man's Fate to the screen. He rebounded in 1973 with "Day of the Jackal" before scoring a final hit with "Julia" in 1977. In all, Zinnemann's films earned 65 Oscar nominations and 24 actual trophies over the course of his five-decade career, which underscored his reputation as a versatile, reliable filmmaker who knew how to produce the best work from his cast and crew.

Relationships

Anna Zinnemann

Mother

Renee Bartlett

Wife
married in 1936 born in England, raised in Chile worked in Paramount's wardrobe department met when he was an assistant director and she was in the costume department for the film "Peter Ibbetson" (1935) moved to London with husband c. 1966 survived him died on December 18, 1997 in London at age 88

Oskar Zinnemann

Father

David Zinnemann

Son
born on May 26, 1940 first film experience as extra in father's "Oklahoma!" (1955) survived him

EDUCATION

University of Vienna

1927

Ecole Technique de Photographie et de Cinematographie

Paris
studied one and a half years

studied violin

Milestones

1983

Directed final film, "Five Days One Summer"

1960

First film as producer (also director), "The Sundowners"

1941

Feature film directing debut, "Kid Glove Killer"

1935

Film directing debut, the medium length pseudo-documentary "Redes/The Wave"

1932

Returned to Hollywood and assistantship with Viertel at Paramount; then assisted Busby Berkeley on dance sequences of "The Kid from Spain" at Goldwyn

1931

Through Viertel met Robert Flaherty; became Flaherty's assistant

1930

Hired by Fox as assistant to fellow Viennese director Berthold Viertel

1929

Arrived in USA in NYC on October 29, the day of the stock market crash

1929

Moved to Hollywood with letter of introduction to Universal chief Carl Laemmle; given job as extra in "All Quiet on the Western Front"; fired for talking back to assistant director

1927

First professional film work (as photographer) on Eugene Deslaw's experimental documentary "La marche des machines/The March of Machines"

After seeing Eisenstein's "Potemkin," Von Stroheim's "Greed" and Vidor's "The Big Parade", decided on a film career; entered technical film school in Paris

During McCarthy era, joined with 25 directors in successfully resisting an attempt by Cecil B. De Mille to oust DGA president Joseph L Mankiewicz (who opposed the blacklist) and to impose a loyalty oath on the 618 members

Directed 18 short films for MGM; "That Mothers May Live" (1938) won a best short subject Oscar

Bonus Trivia

.

A posthumous exhibition of his photographs of NYC was mounted at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1998.

SIMILAR ARTICLES

Next >