Gabriele Muccino

For Italian director Gabriele Muccino, working in Europe was always easier than working in America. A simple phone call to his favorite actress was all that had been required to get a film made in the Old World. Across ... Read more »
Born: 05/19/1967 in Rome, Lazio, IT

Filmography

Director (10)

Fathers and Daughters 2015 (Movie)

(Director)

Playing For Keeps 2012 (Movie)

(Director)

Baciami ancora 2010 (Movie)

(Director)

Seven Pounds 2008 (Movie)

(Director)

Viva Laughlin 2007 (Tv Show)

Director

The Pursuit of Happyness 2006 (Movie)

(Director)

Remember Me, My Love 2004 (Movie)

(Director)

The Last Kiss 2002 (Movie)

(Director)

But Forever in My Mind 2000 (Movie)

(Director)

Ecco Fatto 1997 (Movie)

(Director)
Writer (8)

Four Single Fathers 2014 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Baciami ancora 2010 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Last Kiss 2006 (Movie)

(Based on the Motion Picture "L'Ultimo Bacio") (Source Material)

Remember Me, My Love 2004 (Movie)

(Story By)

Remember Me, My Love 2004 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Last Kiss 2002 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

But Forever in My Mind 2000 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Ecco Fatto 1997 (Movie)

(Screenplay)
Producer (2)

Four Single Fathers 2014 (Movie)

(Producer)

The Last Kiss 2006 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Biography

For Italian director Gabriele Muccino, working in Europe was always easier than working in America. A simple phone call to his favorite actress was all that had been required to get a film made in the Old World. Across the pond, however, Muccino had to wade through a sea of agents, managers and executives before even getting a meeting with a favored actor. This went on to explain well why Muccino made four films in six years in Italy, but virtually none in America, despite signing a two-picture deal with Miramax following the success of his breakthrough film, "The Last Kiss" (2001) - a humorous look at two twenty-something men coming to grips with accepting the responsibility of adulthood. The film managed to crack the ever-elusive American market, but any advantage he gained was crushed under the weight of a bureaucratic Hollywood system that once embraced - aesthetically, at least - his Italian predecessors. Though never content, Muccino retained his sanity - and a large, eager audience - by continuing to work in his home country.

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