Gladys Brockwell

Actor
A leading lady and character actress of silent films and early talkies who frequently portrayed fallen or tragic women, Brockwell began her career as a child in stock companies. She made her film debut in 1913 at the ... Read more »
Born: 09/25/1893 in Brooklyn, New York, USA

Filmography

Actor (11)

Man, Woman, and Sin 1926 (Movie)

(Actor)

Oliver Twist 1921 (Movie)

(Actor)

A Girl in Every Port (Movie)

Madame Flore (Actor)

From Headquarters (Movie)

Mary Dyer (Actor)

His Last Race (Movie)

Mary (Actor)

Lights of New York (Movie)

Molly Thompson (Actor)

Long Pants (Movie)

His Mother (Actor)

Penrod and Sam (Movie)

Mrs. Schofield (Actor)

The Necessary Evil (Movie)

Frances Jerome (Actor)

The Skyrocket (Movie)

Rose Kimm (Actor)

The Strange Woman (Movie)

(Actor)

Biography

A leading lady and character actress of silent films and early talkies who frequently portrayed fallen or tragic women, Brockwell began her career as a child in stock companies. She made her film debut in 1913 at the age of 20. Through the early 1910s, Brockwell freelanced for such companies as Biograph, Mutual, Fine Arts and Majestic, before signing with Fox in 1916.

Relationships

H R Lindeman

Father

Robert Broadwell

Husband
divorced 1918

Thomas Drennan

Companion
was dating at the time of her death

Harry Edwards

Husband
briefly married in 1918 ex-husband of actor Louise Glaum

Lillian Lindeman

Mother

Milestones

1929

Final film, "The Drake Case"

1929

Died of peritonitis resulting from internal injuries sustained when her car went over a 75-foot embankment on the Ventura highway

1928

Appeared as the amoral sister in "Seventh Heaven"

1928

First talking picture, "Lights of New York"

1926

Portrayed a boxer's pugalistic wife in "Twinkletoes"

1922

Cast as Nancy Sykes in "Oliver Twist"

1913

Film debut, "One of the Discard"

1896

Acted on stage in stock companies from childhood

Signed with Warner Brothers

Bonus Trivia

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Some sources give 1894 as Miss Brockwell's birth year.

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"If I am feeling too hilarious and must buckle down to play a very serious or sad role, I have to make myself feel badly. This isn't so very hard to do, when you go about the matter in downright earnest. It is ever so much more difficult to laugh when you are not in the mood for it, than to cry when you feel like laughing."--Gladys Brockwell, quoted in a 1920 interview in Photo-Play Journal.

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