Hedda Hopper

Gossip columnist, Actor
One of the two most feared women in Hollywood during its Golden Age, Hedda Hopper first made a name for herself as an actress, typecast as society women in such features as "Holiday" (1930), "Alice Adams" (1935) and ... Read more »
Born: 06/02/1890 in Hollidayburg, Pennsylvania, USA

Filmography

Actor (23)

The Oscar 1965 (Movie)

herself (Actor)

Hedda Hopper's Hollywood 1959 - 1960 (TV Show)

Actor

The Desilu Revue 1959 - 1960 (TV Show)

Actor

The Bob Hope Show (01/16/59) 1958 - 1959 (TV Show)

Actor

The Bob Hope Show (01/09/55) 1954 - 1955 (TV Show)

Actor

Sunset Boulevard 1950 (Movie)

Herself (Actor)

Reap the Wild Wind 1941 (Movie)

(Actor)

Midnight 1938 (Movie)

Stephanie (Actor)

The Women 1938 (Movie)

Dolly De Peyster (Actor)

Dangerous to Know 1937 (Movie)

Mrs. Emily Carson (Actor)

Thanks For the Memory 1937 (Movie)

Polly Griscom (Actor)

Artists and Models 1936 (Movie)

Mrs. Townsend (Actor)

Nothing Sacred 1936 (Movie)

(Actor)

Topper 1936 (Movie)

Mrs. Stuyvesant (Actor)

Vogues of 1938 1936 (Movie)

Mrs. Van Klettering (Actor)

Bunker Bean 1935 (Movie)

Mrs. Dorothy Kent (Actor)

Dracula's Daughter 1935 (Movie)

Lady Esme Hammond (Actor)

Alice Adams 1934 (Movie)

Mrs Palmer (Actor)

As You Desire Me 1931 (Movie)

Ines Montari (Actor)

Downstairs 1931 (Movie)

(Actor)

Our Blushing Brides 1929 (Movie)

Mrs. Weaver (Actor)

Wings 1927 (Movie)

(Actor)

Declassee 1924 (Movie)

Lady Wildering (Actor)

Biography

One of the two most feared women in Hollywood during its Golden Age, Hedda Hopper first made a name for herself as an actress, typecast as society women in such features as "Holiday" (1930), "Alice Adams" (1935) and "Dracula's Daughter" (1936). As her workload inclined more towards Poverty Row than the big studios, Hopper gambled on a career change from actress to gossip columnist for the Esquire Feature Syndicate. Her insider knowledge and roster of highly-placed confidantes paid off in an instantly-popular platform, published by <i>The Los Angeles Times</i> in 1938 and syndicated nationally. An interest in the private lives of public figures won Hopper the enmity of such secretive stars as Spencer Tracy, Cary Grant, Joseph Cotten, and Katharine Hepburn, while most of Tinseltown endeavored to keep on her good side in a bid to stay out of print. By widening her range to radio and television, Hopper cornered the gossip market and eclipsed the celebrity status of longtime rival Louella Parsons. During the anti-Communist purges of the Fifties, she advocated traditional American values, aligning herself with such staunch Hollywood conservatives as Ronald Reagan and Howard Hughes and counting as allies red-baiting Wisconsin Senator Joseph McCarthy and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover. Hopper's death in 1966 paralleled the demise of the studio system, while her devotion to laying bare the intimate secrets of Hollywood stars presaged the rise of such culturally entrenched scandal sheets as <i>The National Enquirer</i> and TMZ.

Relationships

William Hopper

Husband
married 1913 divorced 1922

William Hopper

Son

Milestones

1938

Became Hollywood columist

1936

Began radio talk show

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