Irving Rapper

Director, Assistant director, Dialogue coach
Like his contemporary George Cukor, Irving Rapper gained a reputation as a director of "women's pictures," undoubtedly resulting from what has been acknowledged as his masterpiece, the Bette Davis weepie "Now, Voyager" ... Read more »
Born: 01/16/1898 in London, England, GB

Filmography

Director (12)

Born Again 1978 (Movie)

(Director)

The Christine Jorgensen Story 1969 (Movie)

(Director)

Giuseppe Venduto Dai Fratelli 1959 (Movie)

(Director)

Marjorie Morningstar 1958 (Movie)

(Director)

The Miracle 1958 (Movie)

(Director)

The Brave One 1956 (Movie)

(Director)

Bad For Each Other 1953 (Movie)

(Director)

Forever Female 1953 (Movie)

(Director)

The Glass Menagerie 1950 (Movie)

(Director)

The Voice of the Turtle 1948 (Movie)

(Director)

The Adventures of Mark Twain 1944 (Movie)

(Director)

Now, Voyager 1941 (Movie)

(Director)
Other (2)

Fear and Love 1988 (Movie)

film extract("Now Voyager" (1942)) (Other)

City For Conquest 1940 (Movie)

(Dialogue Director)

Biography

Like his contemporary George Cukor, Irving Rapper gained a reputation as a director of "women's pictures," undoubtedly resulting from what has been acknowledged as his masterpiece, the Bette Davis weepie "Now, Voyager" (1942). Yet over the course of his career, he was also responsible for eliciting fine performances from male performers like Fredric March, Claude Rains, Paul Henreid and Arthur Kennedy. Rapper flourished in the studio system as his later films attest. With the exception of "The Brave One" (1956), the majority of his later efforts pale next to his Warner Bros. output.

Relationships

Family
had five sisters

EDUCATION

New York University

New York , New York

Milestones

1978

Again returned to filmmaking; directed last film, "Born Again", the biopic of Watergate conspirator turned Christian Charles Colson

1969

Made return to feature directing with "The Christine Jorgensen Story"

1962

Last film for eight years, the Italian-French co-production, "Pontius Pilate"

1960

Went to Italy to direct several films, beginning with "Joseph and His Brethren"

1958

Returned to Warner Bros. as director of "Marjorie Morningstar", starring Natalie Wood and Gene Kelly

1956

Directed "The Brave One", loosely inspired by "Androcles and the Lion"

1952

Final film with Bette Davis, "Another Man's Poison"; shot in England

1950

Returned to Warner Bros. to helm "The Glass Menagerie"

1949

First film as a free-lancer, "Anna Lucasta"

1947

Left Warner Bros.

1946

Reteamed Davis, Henreid and Rains in "Deception"

1944

Directed "Rhapsody in Blue", the whitewashed musical biopic of George Gershwin

1944

Reteamed with Davis as director of "The Corn Is Green"

1943

Made first biopic, "The Adventures of Mark Twain", starring Frederic March

1941

Helmed what is considered his best feature, the Davis vehicle "Now, Voyager", also starring Claude Rains and Paul Henried

1940

First major success as a director, "One Foot in Heaven", which was one of the 10 nominees that year for the Best Picture Oscar; replaced Anatole Litvak

1940

Feature directorial debut, "Shining Victory"; sources claim that Bette Davis made a cameo appearance as a nurse

1938

Turned down several directing assignments while waiting for the right script

1937

Served as dialogue director on "Kid Galahd"

1936

Signed by Warner Bros.; worked initially as a dialogue coach and assistant director; worked under Michael Curtiz and William Dieterle

While studying at NYU, joined the Washington Square Players as a stage director

Immigrated to USA; sources are divided over at what age he arrived in the USA; most indicate c. 1906 when he was eight years of age, although some claim he arrived after WWI in order to study law at NYU

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