John Milius

Screenwriter, Director, Producer
A self-described Zen anarchist, writer-director John Milius was called far worse by friend and foe - everything from a self-styled fusion of Hemingway and Genghis Khan to the Hermann Goering of film directors. Such pat ... Read more »
Born: 04/10/1944 in St Louis, Missouri, USA

Filmography

Writer (21)

Red Dawn 2012 (Movie)

(from original screenplay: "Red Dawn") (Source Material)

Texas Rangers 2001 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Clear and Present Danger 1994 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Geronimo: An American Legend 1993 (Movie)

(From Story)

Geronimo: An American Legend 1993 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Farewell to the King 1989 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Extreme Prejudice 1987 (Movie)

(From Story)

Red Dawn 1984 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Conan the Barbarian 1982 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

1941 1979 (Movie)

(From Story)

Apocalypse Now 1979 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Big Wednesday 1978 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Wind and the Lion 1974 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Dillinger 1973 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Magnum Force 1973 (Movie)

(From Story)

Magnum Force 1973 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Jeremiah Johnson 1972 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean 1972 (Movie)

Original Screenplay (Screenplay)

Evel Knievel 1971 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Melvin Purvis: G-Man (TV Show)

Screenplay

Rough Riders (TV Show)

Screenplay
Actor (11)

Milius 2013 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Hollywood Don't Surf! 2010 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Riding Giants 2004 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Heart of Darkness 1998 - 1999 (TV Show)

Actor

The Hustons: Hollywood's Maverick Dynasty 1998 - 1999 (TV Show)

Actor

American Cinema 1994 - 1995 (TV Show)

Actor

Ben Johnson: Third Cowboy On the Right 1995 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Deadhead Miles 1982 (Movie)

2nd State Trooper (Actor)
Director (9)

Flight of the Intruder 1991 (Movie)

(Director)

Farewell to the King 1989 (Movie)

(Director)

The Twilight Zone 1985 - 1987 (Tv Show)

Director

Red Dawn 1984 (Movie)

(Director)

Conan the Barbarian 1982 (Movie)

(Director)

Big Wednesday 1978 (Movie)

(Director)

The Wind and the Lion 1974 (Movie)

(Director)

Dillinger 1973 (Movie)

(Director)

Motorcycle Gang (TV Show)

Director
Producer (6)

Rome 2005 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Fatal Beauty 1987 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Uncommon Valor 1983 (Movie)

(Producer)

Used Cars 1980 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

1941 1979 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Hardcore 1979 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)
Other (1)

Lone Wolf McQuade 1983 (Movie)

(spiritual) (Technical Advisor)

Biography

A self-described Zen anarchist, writer-director John Milius was called far worse by friend and foe - everything from a self-styled fusion of Hemingway and Genghis Khan to the Hermann Goering of film directors. Such pat labels, however, failed to convey the depth and emotion on display in a Milius film, despite his unquenchable thirst for militarism and glorification of violence. Whether taking audiences on a journey into man's heart of darkness during the Vietnam War or depicting the uncommon friendship of two plebian soldiers from the Roman Empire, Milius made some of Hollywood's most memorable and hackle-raising films and television series. While his gun-toting, right-wing politics remained largely at odds from mainstream Hollywood, Milius nonetheless carved out a substantial - albeit, lonely - niche that allowed him to maintain his trademark individualism, while pushing his brash contrarian views.

Relationships

Elizabeth Milius

Mother

Renee Fabri

Wife
married January 7, 1967 divorced

Celia Kaye

Wife
married February 26, 1978

Ethan Milius

Son
mother Renee Fabri

Marco Milius

Son
mother Renee Fabri

William Styx

Father

EDUCATION

University of Southern California

Los Angeles , California 1968
won National Student Film Festival Award

Whitman School

Steamboat Springs , Colorado

Los Angeles City College

Los Angeles , California 1966
attended

Milestones

2005

Co-produced and wrote for the HBO epic series "Rome"; earned a Golden Globe nomination for Best Drama series

1996

Signed deal with TNT to direct and write a four-hour miniseries about Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders

1994

TV-movie directing debut, "Motorcycle Gang", an installment of Showtime's "Rebel Highway" series of remakes of American International Pictures drive-in fare

1987

Provided the story for "Viking Bikers From Hell", an episode of NBC's crime drama "Miami Vice"

1985

TV directing debut, "Opening Day", an episode of the CBS revival of "The Twilight Zone"

1983

First credit as producer, "Uncommon Valor"

1979

Co-wrote (with Francis Ford Coppola) his most acclaimed project, Coppola's "Apocolypse Now"

1979

First executive producer credit, Paul Schrader's "Hardcore"

1975

Founded A-Team production company

1974

TV writing debut, wrote story and scripted "Melvin Purvis: G-Man", an ABC-TV period gangster telefilm

1973

Feature directing debut, "Dillinger" (also wrote)

1970

Hired by actor George Hamilton to rewrite some scenes for "Evel Knievel" for $1000 a day; Milius rewrote the entire screenplay

1968

Involved in the formation of Zoetrope Studios

1968

Feature screenplay debut, "The Devil's Eight", a prison drama (co-written by Willard Huyck)

1967

Began career as assistant to Lawrence Gordon at American International Pictures (AIP)

1951

Moved from St. Louis to L.A. with his family at age seven upon his father's retirement from a successful career as a shoe manufacturer (date approximate)

Won an International Student Film Festival Award for an animated short

As a student at USC, made his first short student film, "Marcello, I'm So Bored", a spoof of Italian art-house films

Bonus Trivia

.

Once a devoted surfer, Milius sometimes claims to have been born in Malibu, California rather than St. Louis, Missouri as stated in Quigley's "Motion Picture Almanac" and Honig & Rodek's "100001: Die Showbusiness-Enzyklopadie".

.

"I was known as crazy," says John Milius whose first film was "Dillinger", "and everyone was afraid I was going to do something terrible, like shoot somebody or something on the first day. I remember that I had gotten myself into a state of pneumonia and was sure I was dying. I'd heard about people who chickened out [of directing], and I didn't want to be remembered as someone who froze at the controls. So I convinced myself that I could last for three days without dying. I got out there on the first day--a big crowd scene had been arranged, and it had been rehearsed--and all I had to do was say, 'Roll' and 'Cut.' It was easy."--from "Remembering the First Time", AMERICAN FILM, April 1989.

.

Admittedly influenced by directors John Ford ("for his personal views, his concern with people rather than events") and Akira Kurosawa ("for the look of his films"), Milius began his career as a screenwriter."I'm not a director," he insists, "but a writer who became a director in self-defense."--John Milius quoted in PR for "Farewell to the King" (1989).

.

"'The hunter does not exist without the prey,'" Milius says, "'nor does the prey without the hunter.'" In his films hunter and pursued mirror each other. They depend on each other to create the legend that alone will give them tenuous immortality. They wish to be seen as great men. They will become legends by exceptional acts. As the great men they will transcend the essential absurdity of the one act that can ensure their fame--dying. By becoming mythic figures, long-remembered, they make their death worthwhile. What Milius shows is the process by which they build the myth." --From "The Movie Brats" by Michael Pye & Lynda Myles (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1979).

.

"At Warners he converted his office into an imitation of a command post under siege, with guns and military equipment lying casually around. For the first time he posted the name A-Team on his door. He talked of his hunting exploits, of some mystical need to experience the reality of blood and death in hunting animals rather than driving to the supermarket to pick up a cellophane-wrapped package of meat. The talk of war and blood did not, however, give him a warrior past. John Milius, samurai, never passed the medical examination for the U.S. armed forces."From "The Movie Brats" by Michael Pye & Lynda Myles

SIMILAR ARTICLES