L. Frank Baum

Author L. Frank Baum created one of the most enduring fantasies of the 20th century, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900), which spawned a slew of additional novels, as well as a cottage industry of motion picture ... Read more »
Born: 05/15/1856 in Chittenango, New York, USA

Filmography

Writer (16)

Emerald City 2016 - 2017 (TV Show)

Book as Source Material

Save Oz 2015 (Movie)

(from characters: the "Oz" book series) (Source Material)

The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus 2014 (Movie)

(from novel: "The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus") (Source Material)

Oz: The Great and Powerful 2013 (Movie)

(from characters) (Source Material)

Tin Man 2007 - 2008 (TV Show)

Source Material

The Wizard of Oz in Concert: Dreams Comes True 1995 - 1996 (TV Show)

Book as Source Material

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz 1989 - 1990 (TV Show)

Book as Source Material

Return to Oz 1985 (Movie)

from novels("The Land of Oz" "Ozma of Oz") (Source Material (from novel))

The Wiz 1978 (Movie)

("The Wonderful Wizard of Oz") (Book as Source Material)

Oz 1975 (Movie)

(Characters as Source Material)

The Wizard of Oz 1938 (Movie)

("The Wonderful Wizard of Oz") (Book as Source Material)

His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz 1914 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Dorothy in the Land of Oz (TV Show)

Book as Source Material

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (Movie)

(Book Author)

Tin Man (TV Show)

Book Author
Director (1)

His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz 1914 (Movie)

(Director)
Producer (1)

His Majesty, the Scarecrow of Oz 1914 (Movie)

(Producer)

Biography

Author L. Frank Baum created one of the most enduring fantasies of the 20th century, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900), which spawned a slew of additional novels, as well as a cottage industry of motion picture and television adaptations, including "The Wizard of Oz" (1939), which became something of a childhood rite of passage that eventually surpassed its source in popularity and recognition. Baum's work originated from his desire to supplant the frightening, often moralistic tone of European fairy tales with a more pleasing and imaginative brand of children's literature, which resulted in Oz and its 16 sequels, as well as dozens of other young reader books, many written under a variety of pen names. Baum frequently attempted to bring his books to a wide audience through stage and silent film adaptations, though none could encapsulate the grand scope and gentle magic of his written work. Ironically, it was the 1939 film version that ultimately kept his books relevant for generations of readers, preserving Baum's status as one of America's most popular children's authors.

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