Linda Yellen

Producer, Writer, Director
Producer-writer-director of mainly TV-movies, usually of a substantive nature, Linda Yellen had a knack for attracting the kind of celebrated talent that did not often work in TV to her projects. As a result, she also ... Read more »
Born: 07/10/1949 in New York City, New York, USA

Filmography

Producer (11)

The Simian Line 2001 (Movie)

(Producer)

Everybody Wins 1990 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Tennessee Williams' Sweet Bird of Youth 1989 - 1990 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

The Hunt For Stolen War Treasures... Live 1988 - 1989 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Mayflower: The Pilgrim's Adventure 1979 - 1980 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Looking Up 1977 (Movie)

(Producer)

Hardhat and Legs (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Liberace: Behind the Music (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Playing For Time (TV Show)

Producer

Second Serve (TV Show)

Executive Producer

The Royal Romance of Charles and Diana (TV Show)

Executive Producer
Director (8)

The Simian Line 2001 (Movie)

(Director)

Looking Up 1977 (Movie)

(Director)

Chantilly Lace (TV Show)

Director

End of Summer (TV Show)

Director

Northern Lights (TV Show)

Director

Parallel Lives (TV Show)

Director
Writer (1)

The Simian Line 2001 (Movie)

(From Story)

Biography

Producer-writer-director of mainly TV-movies, usually of a substantive nature, Linda Yellen had a knack for attracting the kind of celebrated talent that did not often work in TV to her projects. As a result, she also often found herself in occasional brouhahas over that very talent.<p>Yellen studied film at Barnard and Columbia, earning a Ph.D. in 1974. Simultaneously, she taught film classes at Columbia and Yale and wrote reviews for THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER. By the end of the decade, Yellen had segued to producing and directing independent features, including "Looking Up" (1978). But distribution for these works proved elusive and she turned to TV, producing "Mayflower: The Pilgrims' Adventure" (CBS, 1979), starring Anthony Hopkins. Buying the rights to Fania Fenelon's Auschwitz memoir, "Playing for Time", about the band which accompanied the concentration camp inmates as they went about their labors or were marched to the gas chamber, Yellen sold the project to CBS and enticed Arthur Miller to write it. But when she cast Vanessa Redgrave as Fenelon (nee Goldstein), there was an uproar. Industry icon producer David L Wolper attacked the production saying that the casting of the vocally pro-Palestinian Redgrave as the half-Jewish Fenelon was an insult and ill-conceived. Even Fenelon was aghast and attacked the choice on "60 Minutes". Nevertheless, Yellen and CBS stuck to the casting, with Yellen insisting that she had not even considered Redgrave's politics when she heard the actress would be interested in the role. The verbal volleys continued, but the TV-movie which resulted was well-received, well-rated and earned both producer Yellen and star Redgrave an Emmy Award. Also in 1980, Yellen lured Garson Kanin and Ruth Gordon back to the typewriter, with the duo penning the romantic comedy "Hardhat and Legs" for CBS. Yellen branched out into writing with "The Royal Romance of Charles and Diana" (CBS, 1982), based on the British royal wedding and which she also produced.<p>That same year, Yellen formed a production company with Chrysallis Records, Chrysallis-Yellen Prods. Under that banner, she produced, co-wrote and made her network TV-movie directorial debut with "Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number" (NBC, 1985), based on the memoir of Argentine publisher Jacopo Timmerman. Always seeming to assault the ceiling on network subject matter, Yellen produced "Second Serve: The Renee Richards Story" (CBS, 1985), starring Vanessa Redgrave and based on the story of the transsexual ophthalmologist who attempted to play professional tennis as a woman. In 1988, Yellen split from Chrysallis and formed her own company. She produced "Liberace: Behind the Music" (CBS, 1988) starring Victor Garber, and, in 1989, branched out into reality specials as one of the executive producers of the syndicated "Live, The Hunt for Stolen War Treasure". Never a stranger to publicity, she again won attention with "Chantilly Lace" (Showtime, 1993), which Yellen produced and directed featuring well-known actresses playing women who gather together three times during the course of the two-hours and improvise their dialogue within character. Yellen employed the same techniques with "Parallel Lives" (Showtime, 1994), in which murder interrupts a fraternity/sorority reunion. Yellen also served as a producer on the box-office failure "Everybody Wins" (1990), with a script by Arthur Miller that saw Nick Nolte playing a private detective who ties his reputation to a small-town hooker (Debra Winger).

Relationships

Seymour Yellen

Father

Bernice Yellen

Mother

EDUCATION

Columbia University

New York , New York 1974

Columbia University

New York , New York 1974

Columbia University

New York , New York 1972

Barnard College

New York , New York 1969
graduated magna cum laude

Milestones

2000

Helmed "The Simian Line"; screened at the Palm Springs Filml Festival

1994

Directed improvised TV-movie "Parallel Lives" for Showtime

1993

Produced and directed improvised "Chantilly Lace" for Showtime

1988

Principal in Linda Yellen Prods.

1985

Directed first TV-movie, "Prisoner Without a Name, Cell Without a Number"

1982

Co-wrote TV-movie, "The Royal Romance of Charles and Diana"

1980

Created brouhaha by casting Vanessa Redgrave in "Playing for Time" (CBS)

1979

Produced first TV-movie, "Mayflower: The Pilgrims' Adventure"

1978

Produced and directed first feature, "Looking Up"

1970

While attending to her own post-graduate studies, Yellen taught film classes at Columbia and Yale; also wrote reviews for THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Partner in Chrysallis-Yellen Productions

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