Maggie Greenwald

Director, Actor, Actor
A former dancer and actor, Maggie Greenwald attended film school for one year before dropping out to make shorts and work in production as both a film editor and sound editor. After spending over five years raising the ... Read more »
Born: 06/22/1955

Filmography

Director (13)

The Art of Love 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

Good Morning, Killer 2011 - 2012 (TV Show)

Director

Wildfire 2005 (Tv Show)

Director

Comfort and Joy 2003 - 2004 (TV Show)

Director

Tempted 2003 - 2004 (TV Show)

Director

Songcatcher 2001 (Movie)

(Director)

The Adventures of Pete & Pete 1993 - 2000 (Tv Show)

Director

The Mystery Files of Shelby Woo 1995 - 2000 (Tv Show)

Director

The Ballad of Little Jo 1993 (Movie)

(Director)

The Kill-Off 1990 (Movie)

(Director)

Home Remedy 1988 (Movie)

(Director)

Get a Clue (TV Show)

Director

What Makes a Family (TV Show)

Director
Writer (4)

Songcatcher 2001 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Ballad of Little Jo 1993 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Kill-Off 1990 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Home Remedy 1988 (Movie)

(Screenplay)
Editor (1)

Stacy's Knights 1983 (Movie)

(Assistant Editor)
Actor (1)

Big Guns Talk: The Story of the Western 1996 - 1997 (TV Show)

Actor
Other (1)

Tree Shade 1998 (Movie)

thesis advisor (Advisor)

Biography

A former dancer and actor, Maggie Greenwald attended film school for one year before dropping out to make shorts and work in production as both a film editor and sound editor. After spending over five years raising the necessary financing, she helmed her first feature, "Home Remedy", in 1987. Praised by VARIETY (December 23, 1987) as "involving as it is funny, thanks to a fine script and excellent thesps", the indie was a blackly comic examination of a suburban married couple's struggle to fight boredom. Greenwald turned to a Jim Thompson novel, "The Kill-Off" (1989), for a foray into film noir as her sophomore effort. Exhibited at Cannes, "The Kill-Off" attracted some attention for its ensemble acting and for the director's keen control of tone and mood. The drama about a female invalid whose gossipy manner drives those around her to violence also played at the Munich and Torino Film Festivals. Despite these prestigious showcases that her two early efforts received, neither fared well in the commercial marketplace.

Greenwald achieved some measure of notoriety with her next film, the revisionist Western "The Ballad of Little Jo" (1993), reputedly the first of its genre written and directed by a woman since the silent film era. Loosely inspired by real frontierswomen who altered their identities and lived as men, she spun a bittersweet portrait of a formerly wealthy woman undone by a bad romance and an illegitimate child. To escape the shame, Greenwald's heroine (captured by Suzy Amis in a sterling performance) created a male persona and opted to live out her life in that guise, although always fearful of discovery. Once again, the director exhibited a strong visual style and facility with actors. Although not a perfect film, "The Ballad of Little Jo" found its champions and enjoyed a modest theatrical life.

Over the course of the next six years, Greenwald concentrated on teaching at Columbia University's film school with occasional directing gigs in TV, most notably on Nickelodeon's "The Adventures of Pete and Pete". After a seven-year absence from the big screen, she returned with "Songcatcher" (2000), another period drama featuring a strong central female, in this case a musicologist researching folk music in the Appalachian Mountains. The romantic drama was selected to premiere in competition at the Sundance Film Festival.

EDUCATION

The School of the Performing Arts

New York , New York

City College of New York

New York , New York

The Neigborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre

New York , New York

American Academy of Dramatic Arts

New York , New York
attended the children's program

Milestones

2001

Helmed the Lifetime TV-movie "What Makes a Family"

2000

Returned to filmmaking with "Songcatcher", co-starring Janet McTeer and Aidan Quinn; premiered at the Sundance Film Festival

1993

Breakthrough feature, the fact-based "The Ballad of Little Jo", starring Suzy Amis

1991

Second film, "The Kill-Off"

1987

Feature directorial debut, the black comedy "Home Remedy"

1973

Attended film school for one year (date approximate)

Spent seven years as a film editor and sound editor in TV and film

Began studying acting in NYC as a youngster

Moved to Hollywood; worked in post-production

Joined faculty of Columbia University's film school

Short film "Hot Stuff" broadcast on HBO and Showtime

Trained as a dancer

Worked as an actor and dancer in theater; also made short films

Directed episodes of the Nickelodeon series "The Adventures of Pete and Pete" and "The Mystery Files of Shelby Woo"

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