Martin Amis

Although his father, Kingsley Amis, was a literary celebrity in his own right, Martin Amis has long since established himself as a force to rival his father's in British fiction. Beginning with his first novel, The ... Read more »
Born: 08/24/1949

Filmography

Writer (4)

London Fields 2014 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Dead Babies 2000 (Movie)

("Dead Babies") (Source Material (from novel))

The Rachel Papers 1989 (Movie)

("The Rachel Papers") (Source Material (from novel))

Saturn 3 1980 (Movie)

(Screenplay)
Actor (1)

A High Wind in Jamaica 1965 (Movie)

John Thornton (Actor)

Biography

Although his father, Kingsley Amis, was a literary celebrity in his own right, Martin Amis has long since established himself as a force to rival his father's in British fiction. Beginning with his first novel, The Rachel Papers (1973), winner of the Somerset Maugham Award, the younger Amis has followed in his father's footsteps, producing commercially and critically successful, if sometimes controversial, fiction. Several of his novels have been turned into films or TV shows including "The Rachel Papers" (1989) and "Money" (2010), thus lending further credence to his status as one of the most widely respected authors of contemporary British literature.

Relationships

Kingsley Amis Source Material (from novel)

Father

Hilary Bardwell

Mother

Isabel Fonseca Source Material (from novel)

Wife

Elizabeth Jane Howard Source Material (from novel)

Step-Mother

Antonia Phillips

Ex-Wife

EDUCATION

Exeter College, Oxford University

Milestones

2000

"Dead Babies" is released

2000

BBC adaptation of "Money"

1989

"The Rachel Papers" is released in theaters

1980

Wrote the screenplay for "Saturn 3"

1973

Published his first novel, The Rachel Papers

1965

Role in "A High Wind in Jamaica"

Bonus Trivia

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His father, famed British novelist Kingsley Amis, disliked his work.

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Was close friends with the writer and intellectual Christopher Hitchens.

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On his readers: "My queue is always full of, you know, wild-eyed sleazebags and people who stare at me very intensely, as if I have some particular message for them." - from The Paris Review, Spring 1998

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