Mary Wilson

If Diana Ross was the crystalline voice of The Supremes, and Florence Ballard its fiery heart, then Mary Wilson was the legendary vocal group's soul, remaining faithful to their gorgeous harmonies and stage presence ... Read more »
Born: 03/06/1944 in Greenville, Mississippi, USA

Filmography

Actor (20)

Motown: The Early Years 2004 - 2005 (TV Show)

Actor

Only the Strong Survive 2003 (Movie)

Herself (Actor)

The Test 2000 - 2002 (TV Show)

Actor

Chapel of Love 1999 - 2000 (TV Show)

Actor

Rock and Roll Graffiti 1999 - 2000 (TV Show)

Actor

The 2000 World Music Awards 1999 - 2000 (TV Show)

Presenter

The Sixth Annual Trumpet Awards 1997 - 1998 (TV Show)

Presenter

Rock & Roll 1995 - 1996 (TV Show)

Actor

Bob Jones: Godfather of Black Hollywood 1994 - 1995 (TV Show)

Actor

A Tudor Evening With American Ballet Theatre 1989 - 1990 (TV Show)

Actor

Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade 1989 - 1990 (TV Show)

Actor

Night of 100 Stars III 1989 - 1990 (TV Show)

Actor

That's What Friends Are For: AIDS Concert '88 1988 - 1989 (TV Show)

Actor

Super Picnic '87 1987 - 1988 (TV Show)

Actor

The American Music Awards 1987 - 1988 (TV Show)

Performer

The Mrs. America Pageant 1986 - 1987 (TV Show)

Actor

Miss Hollywood, 1986 1985 - 1986 (TV Show)

Actor

Tiger Town (TV Show)

Actor
Music (1)

Only the Strong Survive 2003 (Movie)

("Love Child") (Song Performer)

Biography

If Diana Ross was the crystalline voice of The Supremes, and Florence Ballard its fiery heart, then Mary Wilson was the legendary vocal group's soul, remaining faithful to their gorgeous harmonies and stage presence despite being relegated to a supporting role. As Detroit-area teenagers, Wilson joined forces with Ballard and Ross to form the Primettes, which struggled to gain the attention of Motown Records head Berry Gordy, Jr. When they were finally signed to the label as The Supremes, Gordy changed the group from three voices on equal standing to Ross at the forefront and Wilson and Ballard as her backing singers. The group went on to become one of the biggest pop acts of the 1960s, with hits including "Stop! In the Name of Love," "Where Did Our Love Go?" and "Come See About Me," but as the decade wore on, their popularity waned, and Wilson was soon the sole original member after Ballard's dismissal and Ross's departure in 1969. After the Supremes broke up in 1977, Wilson found later success as a musical theater performer. Her 1986 autobiography, Dreamgirl: My Life in the Supremes, did much to set straight the record regarding conflicts between Ross and the other Supremes, and Wilson remained the picture of professionalism in the face of two failed reunions that marred Ross' reputation. An elegant in her seventh decade as she was at the height of The Supremes' popularity, Mary Wilson served as proof positive that living well was indeed the best solution to a difficult situation.

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