Michael Gordon

Film editor, Dialogue director, Actor
Active with the Group Theater and such workers' filmmaking groups as Frontier Films during the 1930s and began in Hollywood as a dialogue director in 1940. Gordon's first films were insignificant B's, but he came into ... Read more »
Born: 09/05/1909 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Filmography

Director (17)

How Do I Love Thee? 1969 (Movie)

(Director)

A Very Special Favor 1965 (Movie)

(Director)

Texas Across the River 1965 (Movie)

(Director)

Boys' Night Out 1962 (Movie)

(Director)

For Love or Money 1962 (Movie)

(Director)

Move Over, Darling 1962 (Movie)

(Director)

Portrait in Black 1960 (Movie)

(Director)

Pillow Talk 1959 (Movie)

(Director)

I Can Get It For You Wholesale 1951 (Movie)

(Director)

The Web 1947 (Movie)

(Director)

Boston Blackie Goes Hollywood (Movie)

(Director)

Crime Doctor (Movie)

(Director)

One Dangerous Night (Movie)

(Director)

Texas, Brooklyn and Heaven (Movie)

(Director)

The Lady Gambles (Movie)

(Director)

The Secret of Convict Lake (Movie)

(Director)

Woman in Hiding (Movie)

(Director)
Editor (6)

Curse of the Demon 1958 (Movie)

(Editor)

Rising of the Moon 1956 (Movie)

(Editor)

Simba 1955 (Movie)

(Editor)

Malta Story 1953 (Movie)

(Editor)

Climbing High (Movie)

(Editor)

King Solomon's Mines (Movie)

(Editor)
Actor (5)

Schindler's List 1993 (Movie)

Mr Nussbaum (Actor)

Screamtime 1982 (Movie)

Video Watcher (Actor)

Die Niklashauser Fahrt 1969 (Movie)

Antonio (Actor)

The Idol 1965 (Movie)

Boy (Actor)

Biography

Active with the Group Theater and such workers' filmmaking groups as Frontier Films during the 1930s and began in Hollywood as a dialogue director in 1940. Gordon's first films were insignificant B's, but he came into his own later in the decade with a series of taut melodramas and action pictures. "The Web" (1947) was a clever, strongly plotted film noir, "The Lady Gambles" (1949) gave Barbara Stanwyck a good emotional workout as a gambling addict, "Woman in Hiding" (1950) put Ida Lupino in edgy peril, and "I Can Get It for Your Wholesale" (1951) offered Susan Hayward a suitably aggressive showcase as a fashion entrepreneur.

Unfortunately, Gordon fell prey to the paranoia-driven blacklisting of the era and did not return to feature films until the end of the decade. When he did come back, it was with one of his most popular and well-remembered efforts, "Pillow Talk" (1959), starring Doris Day and Rock Hudson. Gordon followed this enjoyable sex farce with increasingly strained and derivative imitations, however, including "Boys' Night Out" (1962), "Move Over, Darling" (1963) and "A Very Special Favor" (1965). His career as a director petered out around 1970, but he later distinguished himself as a member of UCLA's theater arts faculty. The technical competence and smooth, intelligent control of Gordon's best films, though, made one wish that his professional peak had not been so abruptly interrupted.

Relationships

Joseph Gordon-Levitt Actor

Grandson
Born Feb. 17, 1981 to Jane Gordon and Dennis Levitt

EDUCATION

Johns Hopkins University

Baltimore , Maryland

School of Drama, Yale University

New Haven , Connecticut

Milestones

1969

Directed last film, "How Do I Love Thee?"

1959

Directed first film for eight years, "Pillow Talk"

1941

Directed first feature films, "Boston Blackie Goes Hollywood" and "Underground Agent"

1940

First film as dialogue director

1935

Involved with New York's noted Group Theater

Gained experience in theater with various backstage positions include stage manager

Became a professor of theatre arts at UCLA; eventually retired as professor emeritus

Blacklisted during the early 1950s

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