Michael Haneke

Director, Screenwriter, Playwright
Despite his bleak and often masochistic view of humanity, Austrian-born filmmaker Michael Haneke has nonetheless established himself as one of Europe's most important, albeit controversial directors. Ever since his ... Read more »
Born: 03/22/1942 in Munich, Bavaria, , DE

Filmography

Writer (14)

Amour 2012 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The White Ribbon 2009 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Funny Games 2008 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance 2006 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Cache 2005 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Time of the Wolf 2004 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Piano Teacher 2002 (Movie)

(Adaptation) (Screenplay)

Code Unknown 2001 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Funny Games 1998 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Castle 1996 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Der Kopf des Mohren 1994 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Seventh Continent 1994 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Benny's Video 1991 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Three Paths to the Lake 1975 (Movie)

(Screenplay)
Director (14)

Amour 2012 (Movie)

(Director)

The White Ribbon 2009 (Movie)

(Director)

Funny Games 2008 (Movie)

(Director)

71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance 2006 (Movie)

(Director)

Cache 2005 (Movie)

(Director)

Time of the Wolf 2004 (Movie)

(Director)

The Piano Teacher 2002 (Movie)

(Director)

Code Unknown 2001 (Movie)

(Director)

Funny Games 1998 (Movie)

(Director)

The Castle 1996 (Movie)

(Director)

Lumiere Et Compagnie 1995 (Movie)

featured director (Director)

The Seventh Continent 1994 (Movie)

(Director)

Benny's Video 1991 (Movie)

(Director)

Three Paths to the Lake 1975 (Movie)

(Director)
Actor (2)

Trespassing Bergman 2015 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

40X15: Forty Years of the Directors' Fortnight 2007 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Biography

Despite his bleak and often masochistic view of humanity, Austrian-born filmmaker Michael Haneke has nonetheless established himself as one of Europe's most important, albeit controversial directors. Ever since his emergence with "The Seventh Continent" (1989), a deeply disturbing look at soul-crushing domesticity, Haneke established himself as a director unafraid to explore the darkest recesses of human nature. But it was "Funny Games" (1997), a shocking examination of society's complicity in media violence, that brought Haneke to the fore, earning him both praise and scorn for his often overindulgent depictions of brutality. He earned several awards and nominations for "The Piano Teacher" (2002), perhaps one of the most detailed studies of sexual deviancy ever filmed, which propelled Haneke onto the international stage. With his shot-for-shot remake of "Funny Games" (2008) for English-speaking audiences, and the back-to-back Palme d'Or winners "The White Ribbon" (2009) and "Amour" (2012), Haneke introduced himself to a wider array of fans and detractors who were in mutual agreement that he was the crown prince of cinematic darkness.

Milestones

2012

Wrote and directed "Amour," about an octogenarian couple played by Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva

2009

Won Palme d'Or at Cannes Film Festival for "The White Ribbon"

2007

Directed shot-by-shot English language remake of "Funny Games," starring Naomi Watts, Tim Roth, and Michael Pitt

2001

Directed Isabelle Huppert in erotic drama "The Piano Teacher"; received Oscar nomination for Best Foreign Language Film

1997

Helmed controversial thriller "Funny Games," about a family sadistically tortured by two young men; also wrote screenplay

1994

Finished trilogy with grisly drama "71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance"

1992

Directed follow-up feature "Benny's Video"

1989

Made film directorial and writing debut with "The Seventh Continent"; film was first in trilogy

1974

Helmed first TV movie "After Liverpool" (Südwestfunk); also co-wrote

1967

Began working as a writer and producer for Südwestfunk, Bavaria's equivalent of BBC

With family, moved from Germany to Austria after WWII

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