Mike Hodges

Director, Screenwriter, Producer
British writer-director Mike Hodges honed his craft in television before segueing to the big screen with the gangster melodrama "Get Carter" (1971), starring Michael Caine as a cold-blooded hit man. Dismissed by critics ... Read more »
Born: 07/28/1932 in Bristol, England, GB

Filmography

Director (18)

Squaring the Circle 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

I'll Sleep When I'm Dead 2004 (Movie)

(Director)

Murder By Numbers 2001 - 2002 (TV Show)

Director

Croupier 2000 (Movie)

(Director)

Black Rainbow 1989 (Movie)

(Director)

A Prayer for the Dying 1987 (Movie)

(Director)

Florida Straits 1986 - 1987 (TV Show)

Director

Wgod 1985 - 1986 (TV Show)

Director

Morons From Outer Space 1985 (Movie)

(Director)

E la nave Va 1984 (Movie)

(English version) (Director)

Buried Alive 1983 (Movie)

(Director)

Flash Gordon 1980 (Movie)

(Director)

The Terminal Man 1973 (Movie)

(Director)

Pulp 1972 (Movie)

(Director)

Get Carter 1971 (Movie)

(Director)

Dandelion Dead (TV Show)

Director

Florida Straits (Movie)

(Director)

Missing Pieces (TV Show)

Director
Writer (6)

Black Rainbow 1989 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Buried Alive 1983 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Terminal Man 1973 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Pulp 1972 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Get Carter 1971 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Lifeforce Experiment (TV Show)

Screenplay
Producer (1)

The Terminal Man 1973 (Movie)

(Producer)

Biography

British writer-director Mike Hodges honed his craft in television before segueing to the big screen with the gangster melodrama "Get Carter" (1971), starring Michael Caine as a cold-blooded hit man. Dismissed by critics as overly violent at its initial release, the film has come to be regarded as a minor masterpiece and an influence on such disparate movie directors as John Woo, Quentin Tarantino and Guy Ritchie.

EDUCATION

Prior Park College

Milestones

1998

Returned to feature filmmaking with the character-driven "Croupier", starring Clive Owen

1994

Helmed the two-part TV drama "Dandelion Dead" (aired in USA on PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre"

1989

Last film for close to a decade, "Black Rainbow", a drama about a phony medium who actually "sees" a murder before it is committed

1987

Directed the thriller "A Prayer for the Dying"; was dissatified with studio version and sought to have his name removed from the credits

1983

Helmed the CBS TV-movie "Missing Pieces", starring Elizabeth Montgomery as a reporter tracking her husband's murderers

1983

Oversaw the English-language version of Fellini's "And the Ship Sailed On"

1983

Directed the British TV-movie "Squaring the Circle", a drama about the Solidarity movement in Poland written by Tom Stoppard; released theatrically in the USA

1980

Helmed the campy "Flash Gordon", adapted from the comic books and the 1940s movie serials

1978

Scripted "Damien - Omen II", the sequel to the hit thriller about the devil born as human

1974

Producing debut with "The Terminal Man", starring George Segal; also wrote and directed

1972

Reteamed with Caine as writer and director of "Pulp", with Caine playing an author hired to ghostwrite the autobiography of a Hollywood star (played by Mickey Rooney)

1970

Feature film directorial debut, "Get Carter", starring Michael Caine; also scripted

1957

Hired to work as a telepromter writer

Was producer of the arts program "Tempo", overseeing televised profiles of Jacques Tati, Jean-Luc Godard and Orson Welles, among others

Worked as an editor on the religious TV series "The Sunday Break"

Served in the Royal Navy

Sold teleplay "Some Will Cry Murder"; concentrated on writing full-time

Became a producer and director for "The World in Action" for Granada television

Raised in Bristol

Hired to write, direct and produce "Suspect" and "Rumour" (both for Thames Television)

Began writing scripts on a freelance basis

Bonus Trivia

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"I'm not much of a hustler. But given the way things could have turned out, I'm always astonished that my messages in bottles, as I think of my films, ever got off the ground at all. Astonished, but very happy too." --Mike Hodges quoted in London's Evening Standard, June 1999.

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