Oscar Rudolph

Oscar Rudolph was a pioneering television director who made infrequent departures to the big screen over his decades-spanning career. He began in show business as an actor, mostly in uncredited roles, as in the 1935 ... Read more »
Born: 04/02/1911

Filmography

Director (14)

Love, American Style 1949 - 1966, 1968 - 1974 (Tv Show)

Director

The Brady Bunch 1949 - 1966, 1968 - 1974 (Tv Show)

Director

McHale's Navy 1949 - 1966, 1969 - 1970 (Tv Show)

Director

My Favorite Martian 1949 - 1966, 1968 - 1970 (Tv Show)

Director

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir 1949 - 1966, 1968 - 1970 (Tv Show)

Director

Too Late the Hero 1970 (Movie)

2nd unit director (Director)

Gidget 1949 - 1957, 1965 - 1966 (Tv Show)

Director

The Ann Sothern Show 1949 - 1966 (Tv Show)

Director

The Donna Reed Show 1949 - 1966 (Tv Show)

Director

Four For Texas 1962 (Movie)

2nd unit director (Director)

All in the Family 1959 - 1960 (TV Show)

Director

Twist Around the Clock 1960 (Movie)

(Director)

Private Secretary 1952 - 1957 (Tv Show)

Director

The Lone Ranger 1949 - 1957 (Tv Show)

Director
Producer (1)

Premonition 1972 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Biography

Oscar Rudolph was a pioneering television director who made infrequent departures to the big screen over his decades-spanning career. He began in show business as an actor, mostly in uncredited roles, as in the 1935 Cecil B. DeMille film "The Crusades," eventually appearing, with little consequence, in more than 35 features. Eventually, Rudolph settled on the other side of the camera, initially as a second unit/assistant director, a job he held in more than 25 pictures. In '52, however, television afforded Rudolph the opportunity to helm episodes of series such as "The Hunter" and "My Hero," and this led to his directing the sci-fi feature "The Rocket Man" in '54. During the mid-'50s, Rudolph contributed to episodes of the TV shows "Private Secretary" and "The Lone Ranger," and more series work included a TV version of "The Thin Man" and "The Donna Reed Show." In the '60s, Rudolph became a top sitcom director, working on "McHale's Navy," "My Favorite Martian," and "Gidget," in addition to more than 35 episodes of the classic "Batman" series. Rudolph started the '70s directing episodes of "The Brady Bunch," "Love, American Style," and "Adam-12." After his work on the slapstick sitcoms "The New Temperatures Rising Show" and "The Paul Lynde Show," Rudolph directed one more feature film, "The Wackiest Wagon Train in the West," before retiring in '76. He died in '91 from cerebral thrombosis.

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