Paul Ford

Actor, Puppeteer, Radio performer
Paul Ford Weaver, who cleaved off his surname to make a two-syllable stage name, was a latecomer to acting notoriety. Despite being a natural performer, Ford initially avoided show business since, like many Americans at ... Read more »
Born: 11/02/1901 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Filmography

Actor (21)

Journey Back to Oz 1974 (Movie)

(Voice)

Richard 1972 (Movie)

Washington Doctor (Actor)

In Name Only 1969 - 1970 (TV Show)

Actor

Twinky 1969 (Movie)

Scott's Father (Actor)

The Comedians 1967 (Movie)

Smith (Actor)

A Big Hand For the Little Lady 1966 (Movie)

Ballinger (Actor)

Never Too Late 1965 (Movie)

Harry Lambert (Actor)

The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming 1965 (Movie)

Fendall Hawkins (Actor)

The Spy With a Cold Nose 1965 (Movie)

American General (Actor)

The Lloyd Bridges Show 1962 - 1963 (TV Show)

Actor

Advise and Consent 1962 (Movie)

Senator Stanley Danta (Actor)

Who's Got the Action? 1962 (Movie)

Judge Boatwright (Actor)

The Music Man 1961 (Movie)

Mayor Shinn (Actor)

The Phil Silvers Show 1955 - 1959 (TV Show)

Actor

Missouri Traveler 1958 (Movie)

Finas Daugherty (Actor)

The Matchmaker 1958 (Movie)

Horace Vandergelder (Actor)

The Teahouse of the August Moon 1956 (Movie)

Colonel Purdy (Actor)

All the King's Men 1948 (Movie)

(Actor)

In Name Only (Movie)

(Actor)

Lust for Gold (Movie)

Sheriff Lynn Early (Actor)

The House on 92nd Street (Movie)

Sergeant (Actor)

Biography

Paul Ford Weaver, who cleaved off his surname to make a two-syllable stage name, was a latecomer to acting notoriety. Despite being a natural performer, Ford initially avoided show business since, like many Americans at the time, he was struggling to make a living and feed his family during the Great Depression. But as the economy began looking up, he decided to plunge into performance and scored bit parts in 1940s movies, largely in dramatic fare such as the 1945 spy thriller "The House on 92nd Street" and the 1949 political saga "All the King's Men". Ford's career really took off in the following decade when he was cast as the buffoonish Colonel Hall, the eternal foil to hero Sergeant Bilko, in the hugely popular sitcom "The Phil Silvers Show". Ford's humorous expressions and expert timing made him an ideal character actor for comedic material, and he excelled in that niche. He appeared in many television series and films until very late in his life. He did a memorable turn as the puzzled mayor in the cheerful adaptation of the con artist musical "The Music Man" in 1962. Ford's last appearance before his death in 1976 was as the voice of Uncle Henry in the animated "Journey Back to Oz", a sequel to the popular book and film "The Wizard of Oz".

Milestones

1944

Film actor

1943

Broadway actor

SIMILAR ARTICLES