Peter Tork

A founding member of the Monkees, Peter Tork rose from obscurity to pop idol status with the group's eponymous television series (NBC, 1966-69), and remained with the group through various reunions over the course of ... Read more »
Born: 02/13/1942 in Washington D.C., USA

Filmography

Actor (15)

The Wrecking Crew 2015 (Movie)

(Himself)

Groupies (The Weston Group) 2014 (Movie)

(Actor)

The Holy Modal Rounders: Bound to Lose 2007 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

7th Heaven 1998, 2001 (Tv Show)

Actor

Boy Meets World 1994 - 1996, 1998 - 1999 (Tv Show)

Actor

The King of Queens 1998 - 1999 (Tv Show)

Actor

The Monkees 1966 - 1968, 1994 - 1996, 1998 - 1999 (TV Show)

Actor

The Monkees: The E! True Hollywood Story 1998 - 1999 (TV Show)

Actor

Wings 1994 - 1996, 1998 - 1999 (Tv Show)

Actor

Hey, Hey We're the Monkees 1996 - 1997 (TV Show)

Actor

Hey, Hey, It's The Monkees 1996 - 1997 (TV Show)

Actor

The Brady Bunch Movie 1995 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

The American Music Awards 1986 - 1987 (TV Show)

Performer

Head 1968 (Movie)

Peter (Actor)
Music (1)

Head 1968 (Movie)

("Can You Dig It" "Long Title: Do I Have to Do This All Over Again") (Song)

Biography

A founding member of the Monkees, Peter Tork rose from obscurity to pop idol status with the group's eponymous television series (NBC, 1966-69), and remained with the group through various reunions over the course of four decades. Though his "character" on the television show was gentle but slow-witted, Tork was actually the most accomplished musician of the quartet, having mastered guitar, banjo, bass, harpsichord and numerous other instruments. However, his talents were unable to maintain a career as a solo artist in the wake of the Monkees' initial demise in 1969, and for much of the 1970s and 1980s, Tork struggled with substance abuse and financial issues. The group's unexpected revival in the late 1980s revived Tork's fortunes through a string of successful tours, though the members frequently found it difficult to maintain their Age of Aquarius brotherhood. By 2001, Tork had left the act due to internal conflicts with Davy Jones and Mickey Dolenz. Despite the acrimony, Tork remained as genial and committed to his music as he had been in the Monkees' heyday, which did much to preserve his status as an underrated member of the '60s rock generation.

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