Robert Bloch

Screenwriter, Author
Though author Robert Bloch's career was frequently encapsulated by his most famous work - the 1959 novel iPsycho/i, which served as the basis for Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film of the same name - he produced a vast and ... Read more »
Born: 04/05/1917 in Chicago, Illinois, USA

Filmography

Writer (20)

Bates Motel 2015 - 2016 (Tv Show)

Characters as Source Material

Psycho 1998 (Movie)

("Psycho") (Source Material (from novel))

Bates Motel 1986 - 1987 (TV Show)

Source Material (from novel)

Psycho III 1986 (Movie)

(Characters as Source Material)

Psycho II 1983 (Movie)

(Characters as Source Material)

Darkroom 1981 - 1982 (TV Show)

Writer

The Return of Captain Nemo 1977 - 1978 (TV Show)

Writer

The Amazing Captain Nemo 1977 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Dead Don't Die 1974 - 1975 (TV Show)

Screenplay

Asylum 1971 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The House That Dripped Blood 1969 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Star Trek 1966 - 1967 (Tv Show)

Writer

Alfred Hitchcock Presents 1955 - 1965 (TV Show)

Writer

The Night Walker 1965 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Strait-Jacket 1964 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Skull 1964 (Movie)

("The Skull of the Marquis de Sade") (Source Material (from novel))

The Cabinet of Caligari 1961 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Couch 1961 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Psycho 1960 (Movie)

("Psycho") (Source Material (from novel))

The Cat Creature (TV Show)

Writer
Actor (2)

The Fantasy Film World of George Pal 1985 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

The Horror of It All (TV Show)

Actor

Biography

Though author Robert Bloch's career was frequently encapsulated by his most famous work - the 1959 novel <i>Psycho</i>, which served as the basis for Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film of the same name - he produced a vast and celebrated body of work, including numerous books, short stories, screenplays and teleplays over the course of a six-decade career that minted him as one of the masters of horror fiction. He began publishing stories in his teens, emulating the eldritch fantasies of his mentor, H.P. Lovecraft. But in the 1940s, Bloch wrote a series of novels in which the terror was generated by all-too-human sources, beginning with the fetish thriller <i>The Scarf</i> (1947) and culminating in <i>Psycho</i>, a novel of lethal split personalities based on the real-life crimes of Ed Gein, later the inspiration for "The Texas Chain-Saw Massacre" (1974). Hitchcock's "Psycho" allowed him to work steadily in television and features, writing for "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (CBS, 1955-1960; 1962-64; NBC, 1960-62; 1964-65) and "Star Trek" (NBC, 1966-69), among other series, while continuing to turn out novels and short stories at a prolific rate. He returned to <i>Psycho</i> for two sequels, <i>Psycho II</i> (1982) and <i>Psycho House</i> (1990), which were unrelated to the Hitchcock film and continued to write until his death in 1994. Bloch's vision of psychological terror lurking within the façade of everyday life, as well as his substantive body of work, had a profound influence on the horror genre, of which he was one of its most respected practitioners.

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