Robert Riskin

Screenwriter, Playwright
A prolific writer who transitioned to film following success on Broadway, Robert Riskin collaborated with Frank Capra on some of the director's most iconic films, eventually earning five Academy Award nominations along ... Read more »
Born: 03/30/1897 in New York City, New York, USA

Filmography

Writer (27)

You Can't Run Away From It 1956 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

You Can't Take It With You 1938 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Lost Horizon 1936 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town 1935 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Broadway Bill 1934 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

It Happened One Night 1934 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Arizona 1930 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Men Are Like That 1930 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

American Madness (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

American Madness (Movie)

(Screen Story)

Ann Carver's Profession (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Carnival (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Ex-Lady (Movie)

(Screen Story)

Half Angel (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Here Comes the Groom (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Illicit (Movie)

(Play Author)

Lady for a Day (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Magic Town (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Meet John Doe (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Mister 880 (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Platinum Blonde (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Riding High (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Shopworn (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

The Thin Man Goes Home (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Three Wise Girls (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Virtue (Movie)

(Screenwriter)

Whole Town's Talking (Movie)

(Screenwriter)
Producer (2)

Magic Town (Movie)

(Producer)

The Real Glory (Movie)

(Producer)

Biography

A prolific writer who transitioned to film following success on Broadway, Robert Riskin collaborated with Frank Capra on some of the director's most iconic films, eventually earning five Academy Award nominations along the way. Riskin first worked with Capra on the religious-themed drama "The Miracle Woman" (1931) and bleak comedy "The Platinum Blonde" (1931) before collaborating on their first truly great film, "Lad for a Day" (1933). But it was the classic screwball comedy "It Happened One Night" (1934) that helped define both their careers and lived on as one of the greatest examples of the genre. Of course, his work was not limited to Capra, and Riskin wrote for other luminaries of his day like John Ford and William Wellman. But it was with Capra that he did his finest work, as exemplified by "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" (1936), "Lost Horizon" (1937) and "You Can't Take it With You" (1938). Tired of Capra taking credit for his work, Riskin made his last film with the director, "Meet John Doe" (1941), before branching off on his own. Following his service in the war, he wrote "The Thin Man Goes Home" (1944), "The Strange Love of Martha Ivers" (1946) and "Riding High" (1950). Riskin suffered a debilitating stroke in 1950, though he received credit for "Here Comes the Groom" (1951) and "Pocketful of Miracles" (1961), which were written before his illness. Though he died relatively young, Riskin's output - particularly with Capra - remained virtually unmatched.

Relationships

Susan Riskin

Daughter
adopted birth father was Fay Wray's first husband John Monk Saunders survived him

Victoria Riskin

Daughter
survived him

Robert Riskin

Son
survived him

Fay Wray Actor

Wife
Married 1942 until his death 1955

Fay Wray

Wife
married from 1942 until his death

EDUCATION

Columbia University

New York , New York

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