Robert Stevenson

Director, TV director
Robert Stevenson was a director whose flair for whimsy garnered him a role as one of the silver screen's most distinguished wizards of childlike wonder. Starting out in his native England, he became known for helming ... Read more »
Born: 03/31/1905

Filmography

Director (24)

The Shaggy D.A. 1976 (Movie)

(Director)

Herbie Rides Again 1974 (Movie)

(Director)

One of Our Dinosaurs Is Missing 1974 (Movie)

(Director)

The Island at the Top of the World 1973 (Movie)

(Director)

Bedknobs and Broomsticks 1971 (Movie)

(Director)

My Dog, the Thief 1968 (Movie)

(Director)

The Love Bug 1968 (Movie)

(Director)

The Gnome-Mobile 1966 (Movie)

(Director)

Mary Poppins 1964 (Movie)

(Director)

That Darn Cat 1964 (Movie)

(Director)

The Monkey's Uncle 1964 (Movie)

(Director)

The Misadventures of Merlin Jones 1963 (Movie)

(Director)

In Search of the Castaways 1962 (Movie)

(Director)

Son of Flubber 1962 (Movie)

(Director)

The Absent-Minded Professor 1961 (Movie)

(Director)

Kidnapped 1960 (Movie)

(Director)

Darby O'Gill and the Little People 1959 (Movie)

(Director)

Cavalcade of America 1952 - 1957 (Tv Show)

Director

Johnny Tremain 1957 (Movie)

(Director)

Old Yeller 1957 (Movie)

(Director)

Miracle on 34th Street 1955 - 1956 (TV Show)

Director

I Married a Communist 1950 (Movie)

(Director)

Joan of Paris 1941 (Movie)

(Director)

Back Street 1940 (Movie)

(Director)
Writer (1)

Kidnapped 1960 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Biography

Robert Stevenson was a director whose flair for whimsy garnered him a role as one of the silver screen's most distinguished wizards of childlike wonder. Starting out in his native England, he became known for helming (and writing) several royal sagas, B-movie thrillers, and high-minded horrors, most notably the darkly ontological Boris Karloff chiller "The Man Who Changed His Mind" (1936). By the time he relocated to Hollywood in the 1940s, however, he had settled on the more stately side of his creative leanings, and his ensuing involvement with a fervidly romantic rendition of the literary classic "Jane Eyre" set him on a path peppered by frequent cinematic adaptations. His proclivities inevitably landed him in the employment of the like-minded Walt Disney Pictures, for whom he exclusively directed nearly 20 book-based family adventures between the late '50s and mid-'70s, including the rural tearjerker "Old Yeller" and the wildly inventive witching tale "Bedknobs and Broomsticks". His most celebrated film remains "Mary Poppins", the phenomenally popular movie musical about a delightful, supernatural nanny and her endless bag of tricks. Having retired from Disney (and the directing business altogether) by the onset of the '80s, Stevenson died several years thereafter at the age of 81.

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