Robert Surtees

Director of photography
One of the most versatile cinematographers in film history, Robert L Surtees came up through the studio system, beginning as an assistant cameraman to Gregg Toland and Joseph Ruttenberg at Universal in the late 1920s ... Read more »
Born: 08/09/1906 in Covington, Kentucky, USA

Filmography

Camera, Film, & Tape (62)

Bloodbrothers 1978 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Same Time, Next Year 1978 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Turning Point 1977 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

A Star Is Born 1976 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Great Waldo Pepper 1975 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Hindenburg 1974 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Oklahoma Crude 1973 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Sting 1973 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Lost Horizon 1972 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Summer of '42 1971 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Last Picture Show 1971 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Other 1971 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Cowboys 1970 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Liberation of L.B. Jones 1970 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Sweet Charity 1969 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Arrangement 1969 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Doctor Dolittle 1967 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Graduate 1967 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Chase 1966 (Movie)

(Photography)

Lost Command 1965 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Collector 1965 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Satan Bug 1965 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Hallelujah Trail 1964 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Third Day 1964 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Kisses For My President 1963 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

PT109 1963 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Mutiny on the Bounty 1962 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Cimarron 1960 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

It Started in Naples 1960 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Ben-Hur 1959 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Merry Andrew 1958 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Law and Jake Wade 1958 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Les Girls 1957 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Raintree County 1957 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Swan 1956 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Tribute to a Bad Man 1956 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Oklahoma! 1955 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Trial 1955 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Long, Long Trailer 1954 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Valley of the Kings 1954 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Escape From Fort Bravo 1953 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Mogambo 1953 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Ride, Vaquero 1953 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Quo Vadis 1951 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Bad and the Beautiful 1951 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Intruder in the Dust 1950 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Act of Violence 1948 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

The Kissing Bandit 1948 (Movie)

(Director of Photography)

Music For Millions 1945 (Movie)

(Photography)

A Date with Judy (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Big Jack (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

King Solomon's Mines (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Lost Angel (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Meet the People (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Tenth Avenue Angel (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

That Midnight Kiss (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

The Big City (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

The Unfinished Dance (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

The Wild North (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Two Girls and a Sailor (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Two Sisters from Boston (Movie)

(Cinematographer)

Biography

One of the most versatile cinematographers in film history, Robert L Surtees came up through the studio system, beginning as an assistant cameraman to Gregg Toland and Joseph Ruttenberg at Universal in the late 1920s before moving to MGM and establishing himself as a top-flight director of photography. Constantly keeping abreast of cutting-edge technology, he came to specialize in lush, vibrant, widescreen color lensing, but he also distinguished himself in black and white, winning his second Academy Award for "The Bad and the Beautiful" (1952) and returning triumphantly to it for Peter Bogdanovich's "The Last Picture Show" (1971), capitalizing on a deep focus not permitted by color to make the dusty plains and small town locations seem all the more desolate. Between 1944 and 1978, he received 16 Oscar nominations, twice competing with himself in the same category, and though his three wins came during his tenure at MGM, he enjoyed equal success as a freelance artist, collecting 10 nominations in the employ of other studios.

Surtees' first Oscar-nominated film, Mervyn LeRoy's black-and-white "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" (1944, scripted by Dalton Trumbo), teamed him with producer Sam Zimbalist, later the producer of "King Solomon's Mines" (1950), which brought Surtees his first Academy Award for his superb Technicolor renderings of the steaming jungles, burning deserts and snow-capped mountains of the Dark Continent. The standout sequence was the animal stampede, but the overall beauty of the film convinced the studio to take the precedent-setting step of having no musical score, allowing the sounds and natural rhythms of the jungle to suffice, a decision they repeated for John Ford's "Mogambo" (1953), another Zimbalist-produced picture requiring Surtees to return and photograph Africa's splendor. He also received an Oscar nomination for the Zimbalist-produced "Quo Vadis" (1951), but the high point of their collaboration was undoubtedly William Wyler's "Ben-Hur" (1959). Shooting in the then-new Camera 65 process provided state-of-the-art clarity and color definition in the intimate scenes, not to mention the spectacular sea battle and incomparable chariot race. Its 11 Oscar wins validated Zimbalist who died of a heart attack as the film neared completion.

Though Surtees and director Fred Zinnemann may have been a little tentative in their use of the new Todd-AO widescreen color process when filming the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Oklahoma!" (1955), the panoramic shots against the skyline and the exciting scene where the buggy careened wildly through the countryside behind runaway horses used the medium to maximum effect. Before severing ties with MGM. Surtees also proved a virtuoso at lighting seascapes, particularly at dusk, for the remake of "Mutiny on the Bounty" (1962), picking up yet another Academy Award nomination. In 1967, when rules changed to award a single Oscar for Best Cinematography (instead of one each for color and b&w), Surtees received two nominations ("Doctor Dolittle" and "The Graduate"), a feat he would duplicate in 1971 ("Summer of '42" and "The Last Picture Show"), and for the Oscar-winning Best Picture "The Sting" (1973) he recreated the period by filming in brownish tones, lending a slight rotogravure look to the film. As his career wound down, films like "A Star Is Born" (1976) and "The Turning Point" (1977) continued to win him Oscar nods and reinforce his reputation as arguably the most dynamic, subtle and accomplished cinematographer in the game.

Surtees enjoyed multiple associations with more than a dozen distinguished directors, never aligning himself particularly with any one man's vision. He collaborated most frequently with John Sturges and Richard Mulligan, working on four films with each. Although none of the pictures with Sturges garnered him awards, the first two were robust Westerns ("Escape from Fort Bravo" 1953, The Law and Jake Wade" 1958), followed by the Western satire "The Hallelujah Trail" and the overlooked suspense gem "The Satan Bug" (both 1965), adapted from an Alistair MacLean novel by James Clavell and Edward Anhalt. "Summer of '42" marked his first association with Mulligan, and the soft, poetic Deluxe Color photography for their second teaming, the supernaturally suspenseful "The Other" (1972), once again testified to his ability to shoot superbly in any style. He closed out his career with Mulligan on "Blood Brothers" and "Same Time, Next Year" (both 1978), taking home his final Oscar nomination for the latter. Surtees passed the mantle to his son Bruce, whose resume as a director of photography includes more than a dozen pictures with Clint Eastwood and Oscar-nominated work on "Lenny" (1973).

Relationships

Maydell Surtees

Wife

Nancy Corby

Daughter

Linda Lowers

Daughter

Bruce Surtees Director of Photography

Son
Born July 27, 1937 Died Feb. 23, 2012

Bruce Surtees

Son
born July 23, 1937 Oscar-nominated for "Lenny" (1974)

Thomas Surtees

Son

James Surtees

Brother
died in 1968 at age 64

EDUCATION

Withrow High School

Cincinnati , Ohio

Milestones

1978

16th and final Oscar nomination for the cinematography of Mulligan's "Same Time, Next Year" (Surtees' last film); also shot Mulligan's "Bloodbrothers", released earlier that year

1975

Reteamed with Hill (and actor Robert Redford) for "The Great Waldo Pepper"

1973

Captured the period of George Roy Hill's "The Sting" with brownish tones

1972

Second film with Mulligan, "The Other"

1970

Returned triumphantly to black and white filming with Peter Bogdanovich's "The Last Picture Show", receiving Oscar nomination; also nominated that year for his dazzling, diffused Technicolor lensing of Robert Mulligan's "Summer of '42", which may have bee

1969

Last film with Wyler, "The Liberation of L.B. Jones"

1967

Received Oscar nominations for both "Doctor Dolittle" and "The Graduate"

1965

Third and fourth films with Sturges, "The Hallelujah Trail" and "The Satan Bug"; also reteamed with Wyler for "The Collector"

1962

Demonstrated virtuoso lighting of seascapes, particularly at dusk, for Lewis Milestone's "Mutiny on the Bounty" (shot in Technicolor and Panavision 70)

1959

Earned third and final Academy Award for "Ben-Hur" (color); first of three collaborations with director William Wyler

1955

Used the new Todd-AO widescreen color process filming the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical "Oklahoma!", directed by Fred Zinnemann; earned Oscar nomination

1953

Returned to Africa for filming of John Ford's "Mogambo"; also teamed for first time with director John Sturges on "Escape from Fort Bravo"

1952

Picked up second Oscar (black and white) for Vincente Minnelli's "The Bad and the Beautiful"

1950

Earned first Academy Award for his superb Technicolor lensing of Africa for "King Solomon's Mines"

1943

Received first of 16 career Oscar nominations for Best Cinematography for his black-and-white work on "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo"

1941

First film as director of photography, "Strange Holiday/The Day After Tomorrow" (US release 1946)

Worked for Universal in Berlin

Entered film industry as assistant cameraman to Gregg Toland and Joseph Ruttenberg at Universal Pictures

Bonus Trivia

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He won the Look Magazine Award for Film Achievement (1950)

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