Rosalind Russell

Actor
She was born into wealth and privilege but for Golden Age moviegoers, Rosalind Russell represented the epitome of the working woman. Warehoused as a Universal acquisition and underutilized at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, the ... Read more »
Born: 06/04/1912 in Waterbury, Connecticut, USA

Filmography

Actor (23)

Mrs. Pollifax - Spy 1971 (Movie)

Emily Pollifax (Actor)

Where Angels Go... Trouble Follows 1968 (Movie)

Mother Simplicia (Actor)

Rosie 1966 (Movie)

Rosie (Actor)

The Trouble With Angels 1965 (Movie)

Mother Superior (Actor)

Gypsy 1962 (Movie)

Rose (Actor)

The Loretta Young Theater 1953 - 1962 (TV Show)

Actor

A Majority of One 1961 (Movie)

Mrs Jacoby (Actor)

Five Finger Exercise 1961 (Movie)

Louise Harrington (Actor)

Wonderful Town 1958 - 1959 (TV Show)

Actor

Auntie Mame 1958 (Movie)

Mame Dennis (Actor)

Picnic 1956 (Movie)

Rosemary Sydney (Actor)

The Girl Rush 1955 (Movie)

Kim Halliday (Actor)

The Velvet Touch 1948 (Movie)

Valerie Stanton/Hedda Gabler (Actor)

Mourning Becomes Electra 1947 (Movie)

(Actor)

My Sister Eileen 1941 (Movie)

(Actor)

His Girl Friday 1940 (Movie)

Hildy Johnson (Actor)

The Citadel 1938 (Movie)

Christine Barlow (Actor)

The Women 1938 (Movie)

Sylvia Fowler (Actor)

Night Must Fall 1936 (Movie)

(Actor)

China Seas 1934 (Movie)

(Actor)

The Crooked Hearts (TV Show)

Actor

Biography

She was born into wealth and privilege but for Golden Age moviegoers, Rosalind Russell represented the epitome of the working woman. Warehoused as a Universal acquisition and underutilized at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, the lanky, dark-eyed actress tested her comic chops in George Cukor's "The Women" (1939) before coming into her own as Cary Grant's co-star in Howard Hawks' "His Girl Friday" (1940) - a role refused by almost every A-list actress in Hollywood. Tailoring the script to the talents of his stars, whom he encouraged to ad lib for the camera, Hawks delivered the rare Hollywood hit to please critics and audiences alike, while Russell made of her brassy distaff journalist Hildy Johnson a role model for American women braving the male-dominated workforce. If Russell's subsequent films rarely matched the quality of "His Girl Friday," she found greater satisfaction on stage, winning a Tony for "Wonderful Town" in 1953 and reprising her 1956 Broadway success as "Auntie Mame" in Warner Brothers' lavish Technicolor film adaptation. The four-time Academy Award nominee transitioned deftly to middle-age, playing a small town spinster in "Picnic" (1955) and mentoring Natalie Wood's budding burlesque star in "Gypsy" (1962). Diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, Russell threw herself into charity work, for which she received the 1973 Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award only a few years before breast cancer robbed Hollywood of one of its most unique talents, a glamorous leading lady with the soul of a vaudevillian.

Relationships

Frederick Brisson

Husband

EDUCATION

Marymount College

New York , New York

American Academy of Dramatic Arts

New York , New York

Milestones

1972

Last film, the TV-movie, "The Crooked Hearts"

1969

Last feature film, "The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax"

1958

Played one of her most famous roles, the title heroine of "Auntie Mame"; received her fourth Oscar nomination for Best Actress

1955

Returned to films after a three-year absence with roles in "The Girl Rush" and "Picnic"

1953

Enjoyed landmark stage success in the long-running musical version of her 1942 comedy "My Sister Eileen", "Wonderful Town"

1940

Opted not to renew her seven-year contract when it came time for renegotiation; began free-lancing

1939

Confirmed star status with her role in "The Women"

1934

Film debut, "Evelyn Prentice"

Became typed by MGM in the mid and late 1930s as either classy Englishwomen ("Lady Mary" roles she would later call them) or as a rival to/substitute for Myrna Loy

Enjoyed good leading roles in notable films including "Craig's Wife" (1936), "Night Must Fall" (1937) and "The Citadel" (1938)

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