Skip Homeier

Prolific Golden Age actor Skip Homeier started his career at the age of six, when he lent his high-pitched vocals to the radio soap opera "Portia Faces Life". By 14 he was on Broadway, starring in "Tomorrow the World" ... Read more »
Born: 10/05/1930

Filmography

Actor (28)

Overboard 1978 - 1979 (TV Show)

Actor

Helter Skelter 1975 - 1976 (TV Show)

Actor

The Greatest 1976 (Movie)

Major (Actor)

Starbird and Sweet William 1975 (Movie)

(Actor)

Two For the Money 1971 - 1972 (TV Show)

Actor

The Interns 1970 - 1971 (TV Show)

Actor

The Challenge 1969 - 1970 (TV Show)

Actor

Star Trek 1966 - 1969 (Tv Show)

Actor

The Ghost and Mr. Chicken 1965 (Movie)

Ollie (Actor)

Comanche Station 1960 (Movie)

Frank (Actor)

Schlitz Playhouse of Stars 1951 - 1959 (TV Show)

Actor

Day of the Badman 1958 (Movie)

Howard Hayes (Actor)

The Tall T 1957 (Movie)

Billy Jack (Actor)

Between Heaven and Hell 1956 (Movie)

Swanson (Actor)

The Burning Hills 1956 (Movie)

Jack Sutton (Actor)

At Gunpoint 1955 (Movie)

Bob Dennis (Actor)

The Road to Denver 1955 (Movie)

Sam Mayhew (Actor)

Beachhead 1954 (Movie)

Reynolds (Actor)

Black Widow 1954 (Movie)

John (Actor)

The Last Posse 1953 (Movie)

Art Romer (Actor)

The Lone Gun 1953 (Movie)

(Actor)

Fixed Bayonets 1951 (Movie)

Whitey (Actor)

Halls of Montezuma 1950 (Movie)

Pretty Boy (Actor)

Tomorrow the World 1944 (Movie)

(Actor)

The Voyage of the Yes (TV Show)

Actor

Biography

Prolific Golden Age actor Skip Homeier started his career at the age of six, when he lent his high-pitched vocals to the radio soap opera "Portia Faces Life". By 14 he was on Broadway, starring in "Tomorrow the World", a play about a Nazi-influenced German boy who is brought to the United States after the death of his parents. He earned acclaim for his harrowing portrayal of the deranged orphan and reprised the role in the 1944 film adaptation, leading to a string of performances as troubled adolescents. He made the transition from child actor to grown supporting player with ease, staying within his niche as a bad boy in such films as the Jack Palance World War II drama "Halls of Montezuma" and the family-feud Western "Day of the Bad Man". As the decades wore on, Homeier grew tired of playing villains and sought out hero roles in television, which he rarely acquired. He is well remembered by "Star Trek" fans as both the Nazi Deputy Führer Melakon and the insane and large-lobed Tiburonian, Doctor Sevrin. After more than 130 appearances in film and television and nearly 40 years in the business, Homeier retired from screen acting in 1982, making his final appearance in a one-off role on the crime-solving coroner drama, "Quincy M.E."

SIMILAR ARTICLES