Stanley Kubrick

Producer, Photographer, Director
One of the most consistently fascinating filmmakers in the latter half of the 20th century, director Stanley Kubrick saw his seminal work praised and damned with equal vigor, though oftentimes found that his film's ... Read more »
Born: 07/25/1928 in Bronx, New York, USA

Filmography

Director (16)

Eyes Wide Shut 1999 (Movie)

(Director)

Full Metal Jacket 1987 (Movie)

(Director)

The Shining 1980 (Movie)

(Director)

Barry Lyndon 1975 (Movie)

(Director)

A Clockwork Orange 1971 (Movie)

(Director)

2001: A Space Odyssey 1968 (Movie)

(Director)

Dr. Strangelove 1964 (Movie)

(Director)

Lolita 1961 (Movie)

(Director)

Spartacus 1960 (Movie)

(Director)

Paths of Glory 1958 (Movie)

(Director)

The Killing 1956 (Movie)

(Director)

Killer's Kiss 1955 (Movie)

(Director)

Fear and Desire 1953 (Movie)

(Director)

The Seafarers 1951 (Movie)

(Director)

Day of the Fight 1950 (Movie)

(Director)

Flying Padre 1950 (Movie)

(Director)
Writer (13)

A.I. Artificial Intelligence 2001 (Movie)

(Treatment) (Story By)

Eyes Wide Shut 1999 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Full Metal Jacket 1987 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Shining 1980 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Barry Lyndon 1975 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

A Clockwork Orange 1971 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

2001: A Space Odyssey 1968 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Dr. Strangelove 1964 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Paths of Glory 1958 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Killing 1956 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Killer's Kiss 1955 (Movie)

(From Story)

Killer's Kiss 1955 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Fear and Desire 1953 (Movie)

(Screenplay)
Producer (9)

Eyes Wide Shut 1999 (Movie)

(Producer)

Full Metal Jacket 1987 (Movie)

(Producer)

The Shining 1980 (Movie)

(Producer)

Barry Lyndon 1975 (Movie)

(Producer)

A Clockwork Orange 1971 (Movie)

(Producer)

2001: A Space Odyssey 1968 (Movie)

(Producer)

Dr. Strangelove 1964 (Movie)

(Producer)

Killer's Kiss 1955 (Movie)

(Co-Producer)

Fear and Desire 1953 (Movie)

(Producer)
Camera, Film, & Tape (5)

Killer's Kiss 1955 (Movie)

cinematography (Cinematographer)

Fear and Desire 1953 (Movie)

(Photography)

The Seafarers 1951 (Movie)

(Photography)

Day of the Fight 1950 (Movie)

(Photography)

Flying Padre 1950 (Movie)

(Photography)
Editor (4)

Killer's Kiss 1955 (Movie)

(Editor)

Fear and Desire 1953 (Movie)

(Editor)

Day of the Fight 1950 (Movie)

(Editor)

Flying Padre 1950 (Movie)

(Editor)
Sound (2)

Day of the Fight 1950 (Movie)

(Sound)

Flying Padre 1950 (Movie)

(Sound)
Visual Effects & Animation (1)

2001: A Space Odyssey 1968 (Movie)

special photographic effects designer and director (Visual Effects Designer)
Actor (1)

Making The Shining 1979 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)
Other (3)

Hedwig and the Angry Inch 2001 (Movie)

(Special Thanks)

The Fantasy Film World of George Pal 1985 (Movie)

assistance (Assistant)

Terror in the Aisles 1984 (Movie)

film extract("The Shining" (1980)) (Other)

Biography

One of the most consistently fascinating filmmakers in the latter half of the 20th century, director Stanley Kubrick saw his seminal work praised and damned with equal vigor, though oftentimes found that his film's reputations grew over time. Just as his singularly brilliant visual style won him great acclaim, his unconventional sense of narrative and seeming lack of overt emotionalism often elicited critical scorn. Emerging onto the filmmaking scene with films like "Killer's Kiss" (1953) and "The Killing" (1956), Kubrick truly arrived with his bleak antiwar epic "Paths of Glory" (1957). After playing the role of director-for-hire on the sword and sandal epic "Spartacus" (1960), Kubrick entered the pantheon of great filmmakers with "Dr. Strangelove or: How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Bomb" (1964), often cited as the finest political satire ever made. Continuing that tradition, he directed the technically brilliant "2001: A Space Odyssey" (1968), which was hailed as the best science fiction film of all time, though not without earning some detractors for its lack of emotion. Kubrick courted controversy with the ultraviolent "A Clockwork Orange" (1971) before making what many considered to be one of his best films, "Barry Lyndon" (1975). With "The Shining" (1980), Kubrick waded into the horror genre with exacting aplomb, though he misfired a bit with the uneven Vietnam picture "Full Metal Jacket" (1987). Twelve years later, Kubrick directed his final film, "Eyes Wide Shut" (1999), which managed to garner its share of controversy even after his death prior to its release. Cited by many filmmakers from Steven Spielberg to Woody Allen as being a source of inspiration, Kubrick remained a unique artist capable of a wide diversity in a medium often dominated by repetition and mediocrity. Though his ambitious and often obsessive vision sometimes exceeded his capacity to satisfy the demands of mainstream filmmaking, Kubrick nonetheless laid claim to a distinctive style of cinema often imitated, but never duplicated.

Relationships

Gertrude Kubrick

Mother

Susanne Harlan

Wife
married in April 1958 appeared in "Paths of Glory" (1957) as the young woman singing the German song at end had been previously married to Werner Bruhns with whom she had a daughter Katherine mother of Kubrick's two daughters survived him

Jan Harlan

Brother-In-Law
made series of documentaries about Kubrick

Jacques Kubrick

Father
the son of Polish and Romanian Jews married Kubrick's mother on October 30, 1927

Anya Kubrick

Daughter
born on April 6, 1959 mother, Susanne Christiane Harlan survived him

Katherine Kubrick

Daughter
natural daughter of Werner Bruhns and Christiane Kubrick looked upon Kubrick as her father and adopted his surname

Vivian Kubrick

Daughter
born on August 5, 1960 mother, Susanne Christiane Harlan shot documentary film of Kubrick making "The Shining" (for which she worked in the art department), screened on the BBC arts program "Arena" in 1980, parts of which made it into another documentary "The Invisible Man", shown on England's Channel 4 in 1996 had a bit part in "2001" (1968) composed the original music for "Full Metal Jacket" (1987) under the pseudonym Abigail Mead survived him

Barbara Kubrick

Sister
born on May 21, 1934

Toba Metz

Wife
born on January 24, 1930 highschool sweethearts married in 1947 divorced in 1952 worked as dialogue director on "Fear and Desire" (1953)

Ruth Sobotka

Wife
married in January 1955 divorced c. 1957 was art director in "The Killing" (1956) also acted in "Killer's Kiss" (1955) as the heroine's sister in the flashback sequences

EDUCATION

William H Taft High School

Bronx , New York 1946
classmates included singer Eydie Gorme

Columbia University

New York , New York
enrolled as a non-matriculating student while working at Look magazine

City College

New York , New York
school now known as City College of the City University of New York

Milestones

2001

"A.I. Artificial Intelligence", a film based on his unproduced screenplay, written and directed by Steven Spielberg released

1996

Announced casting of Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman in feature "Eyes Wide Shut" and began lensing in November; completed shooting in 1998; film released posthumously in the summer of 1999

1987

First feature in seven years, "Full Metal Jacket", based on Gustav Hasford's novel "The Short Timers"; shared an Academy Award nomination for Best Screenplay

1980

Returned to features with screen adaptation of Stephen King's "The Shining"

1975

Last feature for five years, "Barry Lyndon"; wrote, produced and directed; again personally nominated for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Screenplay

1970

Produced, directed and adapted "A Clockwork Orange" from the Anthony Burgess novel; received Academy Award nominations for Best Screenplay and Best Picture and as Best Director

1968

Wrote, produced, directed and designed the effects for "2001: A Space Odyssey"; received Oscar for Best Special Effects and nominations as Best Director and for Best Screenplay

1963

Scripted along with Terry Southern and Peter George from George's novel "Red Alert" the apocalyptic black comedy "Dr Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb"; also directed, produced and served as special photographic effects desi

1961

Moved to Great Britain, which stood in for America in "Lolita"; based in London ever since

1960

Replaced Anthony Mann as the director of "Spartacus", at the time the most expensive movie ever made in America

1960

Hired by Marlon Brando to direct the Western "One-Eyed Jacks"; left the project after six months; Brando went on to direct (date approximate)

1957

Adapted (along with Calder Willingham and Jim Thompson) Humphrey Cobb's World War I novel "Paths of Glory", starring Kirk Douglas; as an indictment of war, compared to Lewis Milestone's "All Quiet on the Western Front" and Jean Renoir's "La Grande Illusio

1957

Signed contract with MGM but released after making no films

1956

Scripted first Harris-Kubrick production "The Killing" from Lionel White's thriller "Clean Break"

1955

Founded (with James B Harris) Harris-Kubrick Productions; partnership lasted through "Lolita" (1962)

1953

First medium-length film as director (also director of photography), the documentary "The Seafarers"

1953

First feature film as director (also director of photography, editor and producer), "Fear and Desire"

1951

First short film as director (also screenwriter, director of photography and producer), the 16-minute documentary "Day of the Fight", about boxer Walter Cartier whom Kubrick had photographed for Look magazine

1944

Photograph taken by Kubrick of a newsdealer on the day of President Franklin Roosevelt's death bought by Look magazine; Kubrick subsequently hired as a photographer for the magazine and worked there from 1946-1950

Bonus Trivia

.

"I'm distrustful in delegating authority, and my distrust is usually well founded." --Stanley Kubrick.

.

"I tried with only limited success to make the film as real as possible but I was up against a pretty dumb script which was rarely faithful to what is known about Spartacus. If I ever needed convincing of the limits of persuasion a director can have on a film where someone else is the producer and he is merely the highest paid member of the crew, 'Spartacus' provided proof to last a lifetime." --Stanley Kubrick quoted in "World Film Directors" Volume II 1945-1985, edited by John Wakeman (New York: H W Wilson Company.)

.

"There is no doubt that there's a deep emotional relationship between man and his machines, which are his children. The machine is beginning to assert itself in a very profound way, even attracting affection and obsession."There is a sexiness to beautiful machines. The smell of a Nikon camera. The feel of an Italian sports car, or a beautiful tape recorder. ... Man has always worshipped beauty, and I think there's a new kind of beauty afoot in the world." --Stanley Kubrick to The New York Times in 1968, at the time of the release of "2001."

.

"He does not believe in biting the hand that might strangle him." --critic Hollis Alpert.

.

"He is a brilliant filmmaker, but he does not do well in the final test--as a man." --"A Clockwork Orange" star Malcolm McDowell on Kubrick.

.

" ... I think the enemy of the filmmaker is not the intellectual or the member of the mass public, but the kind of middlebrow who has neither the intellectual apparatus to analyze and clearly define what is meant nor the honest emotional reaction of the mass film audience member. And unfortunately, I think that a great many of these people in the middle are occupied in writing about films. I think that it is a monumental presumption on the part of film reviewers to summarize in one terse, witty, clever Time Magazine-style paragraph what the intention of the film is. That kind of review is usually very superficial, unless it is a truly bad film, and extremely unfair." --Stanley Kubrick to Robert Emmett Ginna from an unpublished 1960 interview (From Entertainment Weekly, April 9, 1999.)

.

"He didn't like stupidity, razzmatazz, celebrity. Stanley refused to accept that drainage of his spirit." --novelist and friend David Cornwall (aka John Le Carre), quoted in Newsweek, March 22, 1999.

.

"He not only understood humanity, he understood it too well. He had no love of humanity. He was a misanthrope." --Alexander Walker, author of "Stanley Kubrick Directs."

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