Susan Harris

Susan Harris made her name creating and producing two very different television series, one of the most controversial sitcoms of the 1970s and one of the most beloved sitcoms of the 1980s, if not all time. A native of ... Read more »
Born: 10/28/1940

Filmography

Producer (12)

Everything's Relative 1998 - 1999 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

The Secret Lives of Men 1998 - 1999 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Empty Nest 1985 - 1995 (Tv Show)

Executive Producer

Nurses 1985 - 1995 (Tv Show)

Executive Producer

The Golden Girls 1985 - 1995 (Tv Show)

Executive Producer

The Golden Palace 1992 - 1993 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Good & Evil 1991 - 1992 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

Benson 1979 - 1986 (TV Show)

Producer

Soap 1977 - 1981 (TV Show)

Executive Producer

The Deadly Spawn 1980 (Movie)

(Executive Producer)

Daughters 1976 - 1977 (TV Show)

Producer

Loves Me, Loves Me Not 1976 - 1977 (TV Show)

Producer
Writer (9)

The Golden Palace 1992 - 1993 (TV Show)

Creator

The Golden Palace 1992 - 1993 (TV Show)

Writer

Hail to the Chief 1984 - 1985 (TV Show)

Writer

It Takes Two 1982 - 1983 (TV Show)

Writer

I'm a Big Girl Now 1980 - 1981 (TV Show)

Writer

Fay 1975 - 1976 (TV Show)

Creator

Love, American Style 1969 - 1974 (TV Show)

Writer

The Partridge Family (ABC) 1970 - 1974 (TV Show)

Writer

Maude (TV Show)

Writer

Biography

Susan Harris made her name creating and producing two very different television series, one of the most controversial sitcoms of the 1970s and one of the most beloved sitcoms of the 1980s, if not all time. A native of Mount Vernon, New York, Harris got her start in television working for the short-lived road drama "Then Came Bronson" and the endearingly cheesy early 1970s anthology "Love, American Style". Harris then began working for producer Norman Lear on his boundary-pushing situation comedy "All in the Family", and later on its spin-off, "Maude". In 1972, prior to the passage of Roe v. Wade, Harris wrote an episode of "Maude" in which the title character (played by Bea Arthur) had an abortion. Harris took the lessons she learned from her time with Lear into an outrageous direction with her 1977 series "Soap". Centered on two suburban sisters, one blue-collar and one wealthy, this deadpan parody of soap opera hijinks was considered downright shocking in some circles for the way it dealt with topics like infidelity, homosexuality, murder, and other hot-button issues. In 1985, Harris returned to television with "The Golden Girls", an instant classic starring Arthur, her "Maude" co-star Rue McClanahan, Betty White, and Estelle Getty. In 1988, Harris created a spin-off, "Empty Nest", starring former "Soap" co-stars Richard Mulligan and Dinah Manoff. Although both series were successful, recurring health problems--Harris has chronic fatigue syndrome--kept her from taking a day-to-day stewardship role in either.

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