Tan Dun

Composer, Musician, Music arranger
Recognized as one of the world's foremost classical composers, Tan Dun enjoyed popular acclaim with his lush score for the martial arts romance "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" (2000), directed by Ang Lee. By marrying ... Read more »
Born: 08/08/1957 in Changsha, Hunan, CN

Filmography

Actor (1)

De Ooogst van de Stilte 1995 (Movie)

(Actor)

Biography

Recognized as one of the world's foremost classical composers, Tan Dun enjoyed popular acclaim with his lush score for the martial arts romance "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" (2000), directed by Ang Lee. By marrying Chinese traditions with western influences, he crafted a unique dramatic underscore filled with rich tones and lilting harmonies that were a perfect complement for the film's dramatic action.

Relationships

Jane Huang

Wife
met in 1993 after a perfomance of "The Pink", a piece in which Tan conducted naked married in 1994

Tan Qui

Father

Ian Tan

Son
born c. 1998

Fang Ying

Mother

EDUCATION

Central Conservatory of Beijing

Beijing 1978 - 1985

Columbia University

New York , New York 1989
enrolled in 1986; attended on fellowship(Music)

Milestones

2000

Wrote the haunting music for Ang Lee's martial arts romance "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"; reportedly completed 80-minute score in ten days; earned two Oscar nomination, for Best Original Score and Best Song

2000

Crafted "Water Passion after St Matthew"

1999

Composed "2000 Today: A World Symphony for the New Millennium"

1998

Teamed with director Peter Sellars on the theater piece "The Peony Pavilion"; premiered in Vienna

1998

Composed the score for the feature film "Fallen"

1997

Wrote "Heaven Earth Mankind (Symphony 1997)"; excerpts performed at ceremonies commemorating the transfer of Hong Kong to China in July; full symphony premiered in Hong Kong and repeated in Beijing

1995

Created "Ghost Opera" with Kronos Quartet

1995

Composed the score for the feature documentary "China: The Wild East"

1994

Penned the original music for the PBS documentary "The Mao Years"

1993

Conducted the experimental "The Pink" in the nude; piece featured naked dancers playing instruments made out of cardboard

1992

Wrote the orchestral piece "Death and Fire: Dialogue with Paul Klee"

1990

Early experimental work "Soundshape"

1989

Provided the score for the TV documentary "China in Revolution: 1911-1949" (PBS)

1989

Composed the opera "Nine Songs"

1988

Had music included in a BBC-sponsored festival of Chinese composers held in Glasgow, Scotland

1986

Moved to NYC to attend Columbia University on fellowship

1985

Penned "On Taoism", a significant orchestral work

1983

Had composition "Feng Ya Song" denounced by the Chinese government as "spiritual pollution"

1980

Wrote first symphony "Li Sao"

1976

Worked as an ehru player and music arranger for the Peking Opera (dates approximate)

Raised by grandmother in rural China

Created "Orchestral Theatre I-IV"

Composed the opera "Marco Polo"; premiered in 1996 at the Munich Biennale

Spent two years working as a rice planter during the Cultural Revolution in the mid-1970s

Began collecting folk songs and music from local villagers in Hunan province

Studied for eight years at the Central Conservatory in Beijing

Bonus Trivia

.

His web site is at www.tandun.com

.

On the purity of classical music versus film scores, Tan Dun told www.soundtrack.net: "I am a composer doing both, and I don't know what other people's experiences are, but I think honestly that there is no difference. Artistically, both are extremely creative, and technically, there are normal distinctions - it's not a big deal. When you write a chamber music piece or when you write an opera - they're the same, but they're different, of course. The same goes for writing for film. All of the people involved are humans and artists, and there's a soul that you need to reach. No matter if you're doing a symphony or a film - they all have the same goal."

SIMILAR ARTICLES