Tex Avery

Director, Animator
One of the most influential theatrical animators of the 20th century, Tex Avery shepherded Warner Bros. ' Looney Tunes series from a second-tier interest for the studio to one of the most iconic franchises in animation ... Read more »
Born: 02/26/1908 in Dallas, Texas, USA

Filmography

Director (7)

Porky Pig in Hollywood 1986 (Movie)

(Director)

Uncensored Cartoons 1980 (Movie)

(Director)

Drag-A-Long Droopy 1976 (Movie)

(Director)

House of Tomorrow 1975 (Movie)

(Director)

King-Size Canary 1975 (Movie)

(Director)

The Blitz Wolf 1942 (Movie)

(Director)

Happy Birthday, Bugs: 50 Looney Years (TV Show)

Segment Director
Actor (1)

What's Up, Doc?: A Salute to Bugs Bunny 1990 - 1991 (TV Show)

Actor
Writer (1)

Droopy: Master Detective 1993 - 1994 (TV Show)

Creator
Visual Effects & Animation (1)

What's Up, Doc?: A Salute to Bugs Bunny 1990 - 1991 (TV Show)

Animation Director

Biography

One of the most influential theatrical animators of the 20th century, Tex Avery shepherded Warner Bros. ' Looney Tunes series from a second-tier interest for the studio to one of the most iconic franchises in animation history thanks to such enduring characters as Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig and Daffy Duck. Avery's work was defined by a strong sense of visual and verbal anarchy, with characters gleefully breaking the fourth wall or the laws of nature in pursuit of a madcap ideal that married the lunacies of the Marx Brothers with the free-form structure and refusal to adhere to the sweetness and gentility that defined the work of their greatest competitor, Walt Disney Studios. Avery's shorts for Warner Bros. and later MGM, where he created the phlegmatic canine Droopy and the hot-blooded "Red Hot Riding Hood" (1943), had a profound influence on countless subsequent animated shorts and television, from Hanna-Barbera to John Kricfalusi's "Ren & Stimpy" (Nickelodeon 1991-95) to Cartoon Network's Adult Swim. Tex Avery continued to provide blueprints for animation writers and artists into the 21st century.

Relationships

Daughter
survived him

Brother
survived him

Wife
pre-deceased him

EDUCATION

Art Institute of Chicago

Milestones

1980

Returns to television animation for "The Kwicky Koala Show"

1974

Receives Windsor McCay Award

1953

Returns to Walter Lantz for ill-fated two-year stint

1942

Establishes "The Girl" and "The Wolf" in "Red Hot Riding Hood"

1942

First Droopy cartoon, "Dumb-Hounded"

1941

His short, "Blitz Wolf," receives Oscar nomination

1941

Leaves Warner for MGM

1940

Helmed one of the first Bugs Bunny shorts, "A Wild Hare"

1937

Directed "Porky's Duck Hunt" which introduced the character of Daffy Duck

1936

Began directing at Warner Bros.

1935

Expands Porky Pig to star player in "Gold Diggers of '49"

1935

Moves to Warner Bros. in 1935 to oversee Looney Tunes

1930

Worked as animator for Walter Lantz at Universal

1929

Joins Walter Lantz at Universal

Began career working with Charles Mintz at Columbia in the 1920s

Moved to MGM

Bonus Trivia

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Claimed to be related to both Daniel Boone and the notorious Old West hanging judge Roy Bean.

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Despite having largely shaped the personality of Bugs Bunny, Avery directed only four of the character's shorts, including "A Wild Hare" (1940).

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Among his lesser-known creations: Screwy Squirrel, a manic, seemingly invincible rodent with the ability to perform impossible feats. His demise after five shorts was attributed to his lack of sympathetic qualities.

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Avery also animated Frito-Lay's controversial "Frito Bandito" mascot, which drew the ire of Mexican American groups.

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Avery's highly sexualized "Girl" character, as seen in "Red Hot Riding Hood," and the Wolf's eye-popping reaction to her, were referenced in "The Mask" (1993).

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Avery landed the job as supervisor at Termite Terrace by claiming that he had directed two shorts for Walter Lantz, though this was later proved to be false.

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