Tom Wolfe

Tom Wolfe, perpetually dressed in a white suit that was as much his trademark as his onomatopoeia-laden, eccentrically punctuated prose, was one of the most influential and instantly recognizable American writers of the ... Read more »

Filmography

Actor (14)

Salinger 2013 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson 2008 (Movie)

Writer/Journalist (Actor)

Cosby 1999 - 2000, 2005 - 2006 (Tv Show)

Actor

Real Time with Bill Maher 2005 - 2006 (Tv Show)

Actor

Tales of the Rat Fink 2006 (Movie)

Voice of Tom Wolfe's Car (Actor)

The Right Stuff 2000 - 2001 (TV Show)

Actor

Uncommon Knowledge 1999 - 2000 (TV Show)

Actor

21st Century: World Without Walls? 1989 - 1990 (TV Show)

Actor

Bill Moyers' World of Ideas 1988 - 1989 (TV Show)

Actor

Storytellers: The PEN Celebration 1987 - 1988 (TV Show)

Actor
Writer (4)

The Bonfire of the Vanities 1990 (Movie)

("The Bonfire of the Vanities") (Source Material (from novel))

The Right Stuff 1983 (Movie)

("The Right Stuff") (Book as Source Material)

The Last American Hero 1972 (Movie)

from articles (Source Material (from article))

Cherry, Harry & Raquel 1969 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Biography

Tom Wolfe, perpetually dressed in a white suit that was as much his trademark as his onomatopoeia-laden, eccentrically punctuated prose, was one of the most influential and instantly recognizable American writers of the twentieth century. In articles for Esquire, New York magazine, and Rolling Stone, Wolfe pioneered a style of "New Journalism" that embraced a novelistic approach, immersing the writer in the world of the subject to recreate scenes with intimate detail. Wolfe's piquant observations of American culture were collected in a series of best-selling books, including That Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, and The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, his account of Ken Kesey's counter-culture odyssey. Wolfe mastered long-form nonfiction with 1979's, The Right Stuff, which became an acclaimed 1983 film about the Mercury Space Program starring Ed Harris, and then turned New Journalism on its head by applying his research-oriented approach to fiction with his 1987 smash hit,The Bonfire of the Vanities, which was adapted into an infamous 1990 film flop starring Tom Hanks and Melanie Griffith. Wolfe's cultural criticism eventually alienated him from the literary community when he pronounced that, with the exception of works of New Journalism, the novel was a doomed art form. His later books, 2008's I Am Charlotte Simmons and 2012's Back to Blood received lukewarm responses, but by then, with his carefully cultivated image and his strenuously unconventional writing style, Tom Wolfe had defined our self-obsessed culture and reinvented both journalism and the novel in the process.

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