Trevor Griffiths

Writer, Teacher, Editor
A stage and screen writer with an unabashed socialist ideology, Trevor Griffiths is best known as co-writer of "Reds", the 1981 feature film based on the lives of John Reed and Louise Bryant directed by Warren Beatty ... Read more »
Born: 04/04/1935 in Manchester, England, GB

Filmography

Writer (4)

Fatherland 1988 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Last Place on Earth 1985 - 1986 (TV Show)

Writer

Country 1980 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Cherry Orchard (TV Show)

Writer

Biography

A stage and screen writer with an unabashed socialist ideology, Trevor Griffiths is best known as co-writer of "Reds", the 1981 feature film based on the lives of John Reed and Louise Bryant directed by Warren Beatty. Griffiths actually sparred with Beatty on the final draft, when Beatty decided that the story should focus on the romance of Reed and Bryant as much as on Reed's American in Soviet Russia angle. Despite their differences, the pair shared an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay.

From a working-class background, Griffiths taught, lectured and edited the NORTHERN VOICE magazine before joining the BBC in 1965 as an education officer. While there, he began writing radio plays, including his first, "The Big House" (1969). That same year, Griffiths had his first play, the politically-themed "The Wages of Thin", produced and thereafter concentrated on working in the theater. His breakthrough stage vehicle was "Comedians" (1975), which featured Jonathan Pryce. After "Comedians" played Broadway in 1976, Beatty asked him to collaborate on the screenplay for "Reds". Despite that film's acclaim, it was five years before Griffiths scripted another film. He wrote "Fatherland/Singing the Blues in Red", a political film directed by Kenneth Loach centering on an East German folk singer who is deported to the West.

While Griffiths film work has been limited, his TV work, particularly in the 70s, has been more extensive. He worked on the 1971 series "Adam Smith," based on the book about a minister searching for the meaning of life. He wrote the 1976 series, "Bill Brand", a Thames TV production about the problems in the life of a left-wing member of Parliament. Griffiths also adapted D H Lawrence's "Sons and Lovers" as a miniseries in 1981, the same year he adapted Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard" for the BBC. His 1985 series, "The Last Place on Earth", offered a six-part dramatic look at the Scott vs. Amundsen race for the discovery of the South Pole.

Relationships

Ernest Griffiths

Father

Ann Griffiths

Mother

Janice Stansfield

Wife
married in 1960 until her death in 1977

EDUCATION

Manchester University

Manchester 1955

Milestones

1986

Scripted "Fatherland", directed by Kenneth Loach

1985

Wrote TV series "The Last Place on Earth"

1981

Adapted D H Lawrence's novel "Sons and Lovers" as a BBC miniseries

1981

"Reds", with script co-written and directed by Warren Beatty, released; earned Oscar nomination

1976

Wrote TV series "Bill Brand" for Thames

1976

Began writing the screenplay for "Reds" with Warren Beatty

1976

Broadway debut, "Comedians"

1975

Breakthrough stage play, "Comedians"; transferred to Broadway in 1976

1968

Had first play, "The Wages of Thin", produced

1968

Wrote first radio play, "The Big House"

1955

Served in British army

Worked as teacher

Was education officer for the BBC

Bonus Trivia

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Griffiths has been involved in writing a biopic of Maude Gonne since 1995.

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