Will Rogers

Actor, Vaudevillian, Circus performer
A folksy humorist and political pundit whose homespun philosophy and irreverent wit struck a deep nerve in the public consciousness, Will Rogers became one of the most beloved performers in the nation on radio, film and ... Read more »
Born: 11/04/1879 in Indian Territory, Oklahoma, USA


Sound (3)

Dead at 21 1993 - 1994 (TV Show)


Love, Cheat & Steal 1994 (Movie)

ADR recordist (ADR)

Love, Cheat & Steal (TV Show)

Actor (3)

Martial Law 1999 - 2000 (Tv Show)


Happy Days 1930 (Movie)


They Had to See Paris 1928 (Movie)

Mike Peters (Actor)
Editor (1)

Blackwater (TV Show)

Writer (1)

Married... With Children 1988 - 1989, 1999 - 2000 (Tv Show)

From Story
Producer (1)

Blackwater (TV Show)



A folksy humorist and political pundit whose homespun philosophy and irreverent wit struck a deep nerve in the public consciousness, Will Rogers became one of the most beloved performers in the nation on radio, film and the stage. Rogers first rose to stardom in Wild West shows and on the Broadway stage with the Ziegfeld Follies, where he showcased his exceptional lariat and horse riding skills while delivering humorous monologues about the day's headlines. Because of his immense popularity in New York, Hollywood naturally came calling and Rogers moved to the West Coast to start a film career. Though he made 48 films during the silent era, Rogers was unable to fully project the folky charm he easily conveyed in his monologues. He left the film business in 1927 for a short time and focused on world travel, becoming an avid advocate of commercial air service, which he expressed in his daily newspaper column and later on his popular radio show. Rogers returned to films in the sound era and found great success basically playing variations of himself in comedies like "They Had to See Paris" (1929), "A Connecticut Yankee" (1931), "The State Fair" (1933) and "Doctor Bull" (1934). But his love of aviation led to Rogers' untimely death in an airplane accident in Alaska in 1935, leaving a country bereft and without its voice of small-town individualism in opposition to big business, mechanization, politicians and hypocrisy.


Betty Blake

married in 1908 also from Oolagah, were Rogers was born

Mary Rogers

born in 1913 died in 1989

Fred Rogers

born c. 1917 died in 1920 of diptheria at age two

James Rogers

born in 1915 as a child appeared with father in silent film, "Doubling for Romeo" (1921) had a brief career in films during the 1940s died in April 2000

Will Rogers

born on October 20, 1911 in NYC former Oklahoma State Senator starred in the 1952 film biography, "The Story of Will Rogers" and played his father in "Look for the Silver Lining" (1949) and "The Eddie Cantor Story" (1953) committed suicide on July 10, 1993 at age 81


Kemper Military Academy

Booneville , Mississippi

Willow Hassell School

Neosho , Missouri



Killed when the new motor of the Arctic sky cruiser piloted by aviator Wiley Post (who had twice flown around the globe--once alone) faltered and caused the plane to fall fifty feet head-on into a river bank; the two had left Fairbanks under poor weather


Signed to long-term contract by Fox


Made first talking feature film, "They Had to See Paris"


Was in a plane accident in Las Vegas while on route to the Republican National Convention (June)


Filmed "Tiptoes" in England


After making several silent films for Samuel Goldwyn and three others which he produced, wrote and directed (and which bankrupted him), starred in several Hal Roach two-reel comedies and then returned to the "Follies" on Broadway


Went to Hollywood; made film debut in short, "Laughing Bill Hyde"


First starred with the Ziegfeld Follies


Entered musical comedy


Legend has it that Rogers was playing with the Wild West Show in New York when an animal got loose and Rogers roped it, capturing the public's attention; hired to perform on Hammerstein's roof

Raised in Clairemore, Oklahoma; called it his "home town"

Went to Australia; joined Wirth shows there and traveled to Japan, China, and returned to San Francisco

Sold cows from his cattle ranch for $7,000 and with friend set off for Argentina but instead traveled to New Orleans, New York, England and Rio (where he learned new rope techniques)

Wrote for various magazines and newspapers and contributed a daily syndicated column and a weekly article of comment to the "New York Times"

Made debut in a Johanesburg, South Africa Wild West Show with a roping and horse riding act during the Boer War

Performed in vaudeville where he first spoke to the audience during his lassoing act to explain what he was about to attempt

Bonus Trivia


Director Frank Borzage commented that Rogers's great quality "was his own ability to make audiences forget that he was a comedian. This quality of his was very apparent in the scenes where Rogers was called upon to portray the simple, human emotions that touch the very soul of mankind. The sincerity and conviction with which he did them is what might be expected of a great tragedian. Audiences forget Rogers the wisecracker and think of him as a human being torn with emotion." (quoted in "The Great Movie Comedians" by Leonard Maltin, 1978)


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