The Limey (1999)

Limey
Type Feature Film
MPAA Rating R
Runtime 1hr 29mins.
Genres Drama, Crime, Action, Thriller, Noir
Keywords N/A
Status Released
US Release Date
  • Steven Soderbergh Retires After 'Side Effects': Is He a Box Office Success?
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    The 'Ocean's 11' and 'Girlfriend Experience' director has done a little of everything.

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  • Erin Brockovich Review
    By:

    Underqualified, underdressed and increasingly desperate, Erin Brockovich opens the film with her name on it pleading for a skilled job she can sense is not going to be hers. No, she says, she has no actual medical training, but she does have three kids. She's great with people, and a fast learner, too. And she's always been interested in science, to the point of once being "madly in love with geology." Doesn't all that count for anything? Not yet it doesn't, but before "Erin Brockovich" is over those qualities will surface as major players in this irresistible, hugely satisfying feminist fairy tale that turns "Norma Rae" into the protagonist of "A Civil Action" and makes us believe it. Based on the true story of a woman the world didn't take seriously who empowered herself by helping others gain justice, "Erin Brockovich" does more than chronicle the rebirth of a downtrodden individual. It serves as a career milestone for director Steven Soderbergh, writer Susannah Grant and, most of all, star Julia Roberts. With films collectively hitting a worldwide gross of $2 billion, Roberts is arguably the most successful--and certainly most highly paid--of contemporary actresses. Yet there is the sense about "Erin Brockovich" that this is the part Roberts has long been looking for. It's a role that allows the actress, like her character, to use her allure for a good cause, to put her undeniable star qualities, her great gift for humor, empathy, romance and vulnerability, at the service of a character with real texture. Make no mistake, this is very much of an old-fashioned crowd-pleasing diva part, allowing Roberts to laugh and bawl, be sensitive and take no prisoners, but it also makes points about corporate malfeasance, self-esteem and the place of women in society that fluffier scenarios want no part of. Long determined to be taken seriously as an actress, Roberts has kissed a lot of frogs (wouldn't everyone like to forget "Mary Reilly"?) on the way to this satisfying triumph. As to director Soderbergh, who started with the justly celebrated "sex, lies, and videotape" and then went all over the place, his career has been no one-way rocket either. But two years ago, with the exceptional George Clooney-Jennifer Lopez vehicle "Out of Sight," he revealed an unlooked-for talent that's on display here as well. What Soderbergh can do as well as anyone is bring restraint, intelligence and subtlety to mainstream material, and what a difference that makes. To infuse an essential sense of unforced reality into stories that sound formulaic is to walk quite a fine line, and Soderbergh's gift for that, combined with Roberts' stardom, should finally supply the major box-office success that eluded him with "Out of Sight." Uniting that film and this one (and what hampered the clumsily written but well-directed one that came between them, "The Limey") is the presence of a strong and beautifully structured script. Writer Grant (helped by an uncredited polish from Richard LaGravenese) has presented strong women before in "Pocahontas" and "Ever After." But this script has more of a sense of life and it's especially adroit in placing believable and well-timed obstacles in the path of its inevitable resolution. In fact, given that the film's ad line ("She brought a small town to its feet and a huge company to its knees") effectively gives away the entire plot, it's amazing how much drama and pins-and-needles worry the film manages to wring from a foregone conclusion. Helping Soderbergh realize this script's potential are top-of-the-line people on both sides of the camera, including veteran independent film cinematographer Ed Lachman, five-time Oscar-nominated editor Anne V. Coates and costume designer Jeffrey Kurland, who has had enormous fun creating clothes for a character who is not afraid of a little exposure. For though her moral fiber couldn't be more spotless if she were played by Julie Andrews, Erin Brockovich does not dress like a saint. In fact, with her big hair, tiny miniskirts, 3-inch heels and an encyclopedic knowledge of the uses of cleavage, she looks more like a hooker than the character Roberts played in "Pretty Woman." Erin is also in the habit of speaking truth to power, of saying whatever comes into her mind to whoever's in her line of fire. "Twothings aggravate me," she claims in something of an understatement, "being ignored and being lied to." Roberts is especially adept at taking advantage of Erin's gift for devastating one-liners, none of which can be repeated in a family newspaper. One of the themes of "Erin Brockovich" is that appearances can be deceiving, so we know at once that Erin is a woman of sterling qualities. Yes, she's twice-divorced, $17,000 in debt with $74 in the bank, but Roberts' presence makes us implicitly believe it's only a matter of time until the world understands that under those skimpy clothes is a smart, hard-working, self-reliant woman just waiting to be gainfully employed. That employment was looking chancy until Erin came into contact with the majesty of the law as personified by Los Angeles attorney Ed Masry (Albert Finney). He represents her in a personal injury lawsuit that doesn't turn out well, and because Ed's the only potential employer she knows, Erin lays siege to his office until a barely entry-level job is forthcoming. Finney's role is largely that of Roberts' straight man, reacting with looks of horror at her unpredictable shenanigans. Still, the importance of Finney to the film's success shouldn't be underestimated. A well-schooled veteran, he brings integrity, stature and a sense of humor to the role of audience surrogate, never too blasé to be flummoxed by what Erin is up to. The other man in Erin's life is George ("In the Company of Men's" effective Aaron Eckhart), a motorcycle hunk with enough skin art to necessitate a credited Tattoo Designer. George not only lives next door to Erin, he's her masculine don't-trust-your-eyes mirror image, someone who under all that leather has the temperament of a caring nanny eager to watch her children while she attempts to save the world. Early on in her filing work at Ed Masry's office, Erin comes across some pro bono work he's doing involving residents of the Mojave Desert town of Hinkley. They're all getting sick and the mammoth PG&E corporation, the place's biggest employer, suspiciously claims to have nothing to do with it. Intrigued, Erin convinces Ed to let her look into the situation, and soon enough she is using her people skills and interest in science, not to mention her world-class flirting ability, to get at the heart of the problem and convince the townsfolk to let her and the lawyers do something about it. "Erin Brockovich" is helped, as was "Out of Sight," by excellent acting down to its smallest roles. Finely cast by Margery Simkin, the script was strong enough to attract talents like Cherry Jones and Marg Helgenberger to supporting but pivotal roles as townspeople and is obviously much the stronger for it. There are also a pair of amusing cameos, one by the real Erin Brockovich as a waitress who waits, in effect, on herself, and the other by producer Michael Shamberg, convincing as an untrustworthy corporate attorney. Though the publicity material huffs and puffs about Erin being a role model for the new millennium, in fact what's most exciting about this film is how old-fashioned it is at its core. It uses standard Hollywood building blocks like big stars and a Cinderella story line laced with laughter and tears and reminds us why they became standard in the first place. More than anything, it reminds us how much intelligent entertainment value there can be in traditional material, if only someone has the wit to realize it and the skill to get it out. MPAA rating: R, for language. Times guidelin es: Brockovich is a torrent of profanity. 'Erin Brockovich' Julia Roberts: Erin Brockovich Albert Finney: Ed Masry Aaron Eckhart: George Marg Helgenberger: Donna Jensen Cherry Jones: Pamela Duncan Peter Coyote: Kurt Potter Universal Pictures and Columbia Pictures present a Jersey Films production. Director Steven Soderbergh. Producers Danny DeVito, Michael Shamberg, Stacey Sher. Written by Susannah Grant. Executive producers John Hardy, Carla Santos Shamberg. Cinematographer Ed Lachman. Editor Anne V. Coates. Production design Philip Messina. Music Thomas Newman. Costumes Jeffrey Kurland. Art director Christa Munro. Set decorator Kristen Toscano Messina. Running time: 2 hours, 11 minutes.

  • Julia Roberts Snaps Up British Author's New Novel
    By: WENN.com Source June 30, 2005 9:49am GMT+0000

    Julia Roberts snapped up the film rights to British author Tony Parsons' new novel and commissioned him to turn it into screenplay--before he'd even finished writing it.

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  • 'The Insider' Looking Golden
    By: Fiona Ng March 19, 2001 4:50pm GMT+0000

    SANTA MONICA, Calif., Jan. 17, 2000 -- Yet another awards ceremony honoring the same people and the same films were held this past weekend -- this time by the International Press Academy for its fourth annual Golden Satellite Awards. Among the winners were some of the award circuit's established favorites including "The Insider", which took top honors as best dramatic film. Its helmer, Michael Mann, was named best director. Previous best-film laurels for "The Insider" came from the likes of the

  • 'The Limey,' 'Election' Got the Spirit
    By: Jim Bartoo March 19, 2001 4:50pm GMT+0000

    SANTA MONICA, Calif., Jan. 13, 2000 -- Steven Soderbergh's crime-drama "The Limey" and Alexander Payne's high school satire "Election" led the pack of (relatively) low-budget, high-expectation projects as nominations were announced Wednesday for the 15th Annual Independent Spirit Awards, honoring, yes, indie film. "The Limey" and "Election" received a field-best five nominations each. Hollywood blockbusters such as "Toy Story 2" and "The Green Mile" received zippo. (They're not indies.) With the

  • Erin Brockovich Review
    By:

    StoryUnderqualified, underdressed and increasingly desperate, Erin Brockovich opens the film with her name on it pleading for a skilled job she can sense is not going to be hers. No, she says, she has no actual medical training, but she does have three kids. She's great with people, and a fast learner, too. And she's always been interested in science, to the point of once being "madly in love with geology." Doesn't all that count for anything? Not yet it doesn't, but before "Erin Brockovich" is over those qualities will surface as major players in this irresistible, hugely satisfying feminist fairy tale that turns "Norma Rae" into the protagonist of "A Civil Action" and makes us believe it. DirectorBased on the true story of a woman the world didn't take seriously who empowered herself by helping others gain justice, "Erin Brockovich" does more than chronicle the rebirth of a downtrodden individual. It serves as a career milestone for director Steven Soderbergh, writer Susannah Grant and, most of all, star Julia Roberts. With films collectively hitting a worldwide gross of $2 billion, Roberts is arguably the most successful--and certainly most highly paid--of contemporary actresses. Yet there is the sense about "Erin Brockovich" that this is the part Roberts has long been looking for. It's a role that allows the actress, like her character, to use her allure for a good cause, to put her undeniable star qualities, her great gift for humor, empathy, romance and vulnerability, at the service of a character with real texture. Make no mistake, this is very much of an old-fashioned crowd-pleasing diva part, allowing Roberts to laugh and bawl, be sensitive and take no prisoners, but it also makes points about corporate malfeasance, self-esteem and the place of women in society that fluffier scenarios want no part of. Long determined to be taken seriously as an actress, Roberts has kissed a lot of frogs (wouldn't everyone like to forget "Mary Reilly"?) on the way to this satisfying triumph. As to director Soderbergh, who started with the justly celebrated "sex, lies, and videotape" and then went all over the place, his career has been no one-way rocket either. But two years ago, with the exceptional George Clooney-Jennifer Lopez vehicle "Out of Sight," he revealed an unlooked-for talent that's on display here as well. What Soderbergh can do as well as anyone is bring restraint, intelligence and subtlety to mainstream material, and what a difference that makes. To infuse an essential sense of unforced reality into stories that sound formulaic is to walk quite a fine line, and Soderbergh's gift for that, combined with Roberts' stardom, should finally supply the major box-office success that eluded him with "Out of Sight." Uniting that film and this one (and what hampered the clumsily written but well-directed one that came between them, "The Limey") is the presence of a strong and beautifully structured script. Writer Grant (helped by an uncredited polish from Richard LaGravenese) has presented strong women before in "Pocahontas" and "Ever After." But this script has more of a sense of life and it's especially adroit in placing believable and well-timed obstacles in the path of its inevitable resolution. In fact, given that the film's ad line ("She brought a small town to its feet and a huge company to its knees") effectively gives away the entire plot, it's amazing how much drama and pins-and-needles worry the film manages to wring from a foregone conclusion. Helping Soderbergh realize this script's potential are top-of-the-line people on both sides of the camera, including veteran independent film cinematographer Ed Lachman, five-time Oscar-nominated editor Anne V. Coates and costume designer Jeffrey Kurland, who has had enormous fun creating clothes for a character who is not afraid of a little exposure. For though her moral fiber couldn't be more spotless if she were played by Julie Andrews, Erin Brockovich does not dress like a saint. In fact, with her big hair, tiny miniskirts, 3-inch heels and an encyclopedic knowledge of the uses of cleavage, she looks more like a hooker than the character Roberts played in "Pretty Woman." Erin is also in the habit of speaking truth to power, of saying whatever comes into her mind to whoever's in her line of fire. "Twothings aggravate me," she claims in something of an understatement, "being ignored and being lied to." Roberts is especially adept at taking advantage of Erin's gift for devastating one-liners, none of which can be repeated in a family newspaper. One of the themes of "Erin Brockovich" is that appearances can be deceiving, so we know at once that Erin is a woman of sterling qualities. Yes, she's twice-divorced, $17,000 in debt with $74 in the bank, but Roberts' presence makes us implicitly believe it's only a matter of time until the world understands that under those skimpy clothes is a smart, hard-working, self-reliant woman just waiting to be gainfully employed. That employment was looking chancy until Erin came into contact with the majesty of the law as personified by Los Angeles attorney Ed Masry (Albert Finney). He represents her in a personal injury lawsuit that doesn't turn out well, and because Ed's the only potential employer she knows, Erin lays siege to his office until a barely entry-level job is forthcoming. Finney's role is largely that of Roberts' straight man, reacting with looks of horror at her unpredictable shenanigans. Still, the importance of Finney to the film's success shouldn't be underestimated. A well-schooled veteran, he brings integrity, stature and a sense of humor to the role of audience surrogate, never too blasé to be flummoxed by what Erin is up to. The other man in Erin's life is George ("In the Company of Men's" effective Aaron Eckhart), a motorcycle hunk with enough skin art to necessitate a credited Tattoo Designer. George not only lives next door to Erin, he's her masculine don't-trust-your-eyes mirror image, someone who under all that leather has the temperament of a caring nanny eager to watch her children while she attempts to save the world. Early on in her filing work at Ed Masry's office, Erin comes across some pro bono work he's doing involving residents of the Mojave Desert town of Hinkley. They're all getting sick and the mammoth PG&E corporation, the place's biggest employer, suspiciously claims to have nothing to do with it. Intrigued, Erin convinces Ed to let her look into the situation, and soon enough she is using her people skills and interest in science, not to mention her world-class flirting ability, to get at the heart of the problem and convince the townsfolk to let her and the lawyers do something about it. "Erin Brockovich" is helped, as was "Out of Sight," by excellent acting down to its smallest roles. Finely cast by Margery Simkin, the script was strong enough to attract talents like Cherry Jones and Marg Helgenberger to supporting but pivotal roles as townspeople and is obviously much the stronger for it. There are also a pair of amusing cameos, one by the real Erin Brockovich as a waitress who waits, in effect, on herself, and the other by producer Michael Shamberg, convincing as an untrustworthy corporate attorney. Though the publicity material huffs and puffs about Erin being a role model for the new millennium, in fact what's most exciting about this film is how old-fashioned it is at its core. It uses standard Hollywood building blocks like big stars and a Cinderella story line laced with laughter and tears and reminds us why they became standard in the first place. More than anything, it reminds us how much intelligent entertainment value there can be in traditional material, if only someone has the wit to realize it and the skill to get it out. MPAA rating: R, for language. Times guidelines: Brockovich is a torrent of profanity. 'Erin Brockovich' Julia Roberts: Erin Brockovich Albert Finney: Ed Masry Aaron Eckhart: George Marg Helgenberger: Donna Jensen Cherry Jones: Pamela Duncan Peter Coyote: Kurt Potter Universal Pictures and Columbia Pictures present a Jersey Films production. Director Steven Soderbergh. Producers Danny DeVito, Michael Shamberg, Stacey Sher. Written by Susannah Grant. Executive producers John Hardy, Carla Santos Shamberg. Cinematographer Ed Lachman. Editor Anne V. Coates. Production design Philip Messina. Music Thomas Newman. Costumes Jeffrey Kurland. Art director Christa Munro. Set decorator Kristen Toscano Messina. Running time: 2 hours, 11 minutes.

Name Credit Credited as Role Id Sort Order
Terence Stamp Actor Wilson 1 1000001
Lesley Warren Actor Elaine 1 1000002
Luis Guzman Actor Ed 1 1000003
Barry Newman Actor Avery 1 1000004
Joe Dallesandro Actor Uncle John 1 1000005
Nicky Katt Actor Stacy 1 1000006
Peter Fonda Actor Valentine 1 1000007
Amelia Heinle Actor Adhara 1 1000008
Melissa George Actor Jennifer 1 1000009
William Lucking Actor Warehouse Foreman 1 1000010
Matthew Kimbrough Actor Tom 1 1000011
John Robotham Actor Rick 1 1000012
Steve Heinze Actor Larry 1 1000013
Nancy Lenehan Actor Lady on Plane 1 1000014
Wayne Pe're' Actor Pool Hall Creep 1 1000015
John Cothran Actor DEA Guy 1 1000016
Ousaun Elam Actor DEA Guy 1 1000017
Dwayne McGee Actor DEA Guy 1 1000018
Brian Bennett Actor DEA Guy 1 1000019
Allan Graf Actor Gordon 1 1000020
Carl Ciarfalio Actor Warehouse Thug 1 1000021
George Ruge Actor Warehouse Thug 1 1000022
Lincoln Simmons Actor Warehouse Thug 1 1000023
Rainbow Borden Actor Warehouse Sweeper 1 1000024
Michaela Gallo Actor Young Jennifer 1 1000025
Jose Perez Actor Teen Gun Dealer 1 1000026
Alex Perez Actor Teen Gun Dealer 1 1000027
Brandon Keener Actor Excited Guy 1 1000028
Jim Jenkins Actor Party Guy 1 1000029
Mark Gerschwin Actor Party Guy No 2 1 1000030
Johnny Sanchez Actor Valet 1 1000031
Brook Bridges Actor Child Actress 1 1000032
George Clooney Actor (cameo appearance) 1 1000033
Steven Soderbergh Director n/a 2 2000001
John Hardy Producer n/a 3 3000001
Scott Kramer Producer n/a 3 3000002
Lem Dobbs Screenplay n/a 120778 4000001
Frederic Brost Unit Production Manager n/a 182 5000001
Pat Chapman Unit Production Manager n/a 182 5000002
Gregory Jacobs Assistant Director n/a 163 5000003
Dave Hallinan Assistant Director n/a 163 5000004
Lisa Bloch Assistant Director 2nd assistant director 163 5000005
Vincent Gonzales Assistant Director n/a 163 5000006
Caitlin Maloney Post-Production Supervisor n/a 120796 5000007
Ken Lavet Location Manager n/a 193 5000008
Annie Welles Script Supervisor n/a 191 5000009
David Conley Production Coordinator production office coordinator 162 5000010
Nancy Reid Assistant Production Coordinator n/a 192 5000011
Jane Graves Assistant Location Manager n/a 194 5000012
Phyllis Decker Assistant Location Manager (Monterey) 194 5000013
Edmund Lachmann Director of Photography n/a 120780 6000001
Ray De La Motte Camera Operator n/a 239 6000002
Stacy De La Motte Camera camera loader 120798 6000003
Robert Morgenroth Video video supervisor(E=mc2) 120800 6000004
Brett Cody Video video coordinator(E=mc2) 120800 6000005
Bob Marshak Photography still photographer 120835 6000006
Dana Ross Color Timer n/a 120921 6000007
Mike Hall Camera Assistant "A" camera 1st assistant 120867 6000008
Gary Dunham Camera Assistant "B" camera 1st assistant 120867 6000009
Katie Santore Camera Assistant "A" camera 2nd assistant 120867 6000010
Tammy Fouts Camera Assistant "B" camera 2nd assistant 120867 6000011
Marta Weiss Camera Assistant "B" camera 2nd assistant 120867 6000012
Sarah Flack Editor n/a 172 7000001
Carol Fleming Assistant Editor n/a 203 7000002
Anne Sawyer Assistant Editor n/a 203 7000003
Angie Luckey Assistant Editor n/a 203 7000004
Cliff Martinez Composer music composer 120836 8000001
Buck Damon Music music consultant 120781 8000002
Leanne Ungar Music music recorder & mixer 120781 8000003
David Piltch Music bass 120781 8000004
Jack Smalley Music Arranger strings arranger & conductor 121019 8000005
Amanda Scheer-Demme Music Supervisor n/a 120872 8000006
Michael Williams Performer piano 120819 8000007
Pete Townshend Song ("The Seeker") 120859 8000009
Danny Saber Song n/a 120859 8000013
Chester Thompson Song ("Squib Cakes") 120859 8000014
Tom Scholz Song ("Smokin'") 120859 8000015
Bradley Delp Song ("Smokin'") 120859 8000016
John Kay Song ("Magic Carpet Ride") 120859 8000017
Rushton Moreve Song ("Magic Carpet Ride") 120859 8000018
Harry Garfield Song n/a 120859 8000019
David Crosby Song ("It Happens Each Day") 120859 8000020
Tom Johnston Song ("China Grove") 120859 8000021
Donovan Leitch Song ("Colours") 120859 8000022
Danny Saber Song Performer ("Spy" "Limey Vibes" "Moog Song" "Move" "Sitar Song") 120788 8000025
Boston Song Performer ("Smokin'") 120788 8000027
Harry Garfield Song Performer ("Flosso Bosso") 120788 8000029
Terence Stamp Song Performer ("Colours") 120788 8000032
Gary Frutkoff Production Designer n/a 164 9000001
Kathryn Peters Set Decorator n/a 165 9000002
Jon Bush Set Dresser n/a 197 9000003
Harry Frierson Set Dresser n/a 197 9000004
R McGee Set Dresser n/a 197 9000005
Michael Koellner Set Dresser n/a 197 9000006
Kris Fuller Set Dresser n/a 197 9000007
David Elton Set Dresser on-set dresser 197 9000008
Chris Patterson Set Dresser on-set dresser 197 9000009
David Potter Lead Person leadman 120957 9000010
Blair Huizingh Art Department Coordinator n/a 195 9000011
Andrea Brody Art Assistant art department assistant 120974 9000012
Debra Zane Casting n/a 179 10000001
Terri Taylor Casting Associate casting assistant 160 10000002
Rich King Extras Casting (Axium Casting) 120851 10000003
Louise Frogley Costume Designer n/a 169 13000001
Joyce Kogut Costume Supervisor n/a 120895 13000002
Robert Gmuer Costumes costumer 120828 13000003
Bonnie Clevering Hair Stylist key hairstylist 120799 13000004
Waldo Sanchez Hair Stylist n/a 120799 13000005
Deborah Mills-Whitlock Hair Stylist n/a 120799 13000006
Rick Sharp Makeup Artist key makeup artist 120801 13000007
Ken Chase Makeup Artist n/a 120801 13000008
Raqueli Dahan Makeup Artist n/a 120801 13000009
Suzanne Cranfill Set Costumer n/a 121008 13000010
Newell Alexander ADR ADR group 120912 14000001
Elisa Pensler-Gabrielli ADR ADR group 120912 14000002
Mitch Carter ADR ADR group 120912 14000003
Luisa Leschin ADR ADR group 120912 14000004
David Cowgill ADR ADR group 120912 14000005
Edie Mirman ADR ADR group 120912 14000006
Iake Eissinmann ADR ADR group 120912 14000007
Claudette Wells ADR ADR group 120912 14000008
James Morioka Assistant Sound Editor n/a 222 14000009
Perry Dodgson Boom Operator n/a 215 14000010
Alicia Stevenson Foley n/a 120961 14000011
Dawn Fintor Foley n/a 120961 14000012
David Betancourt Foley Mixer n/a 224 14000013
Carrie Cashman Foley Recordist n/a 225 14000014
Larry Blake Rerecording re-recording mixer 120995 14000015
Melissa Hofmann Rerecording re-recording mixer 120995 14000016
Tom Fox Sound utility sound 120816 14000017
Larry Blake Sound Editor n/a 229 14000018
Aaron Glascock Sound Editor all-purpose sound editor 229 14000019
Marvin Walowitz Sound Editor n/a 229 14000020
Mike Chock Sound Editor n/a 229 14000021
Ezra Dweck Sound Editor n/a 229 14000022
Jim Webb Sound Mixer production sound mixer 230 14000024
Jon Salzman Swing Electric 120862 15000001
Richard Hartley Rigging Gaffer n/a 120937 15000002
Charles Bukey Key Grip n/a 263 15000003
Gary Brostrom Key Grip key riggin grip 263 15000004
Daisuke Miyake Grip n/a 365 15000005
Thomas Currna Grip n/a 365 15000006
Lionel Portugal Grip n/a 365 15000007
Robert Clancey Grip rigging grip 365 15000008
Craig Aines Grip rigging grip 365 15000009
John DeBlau Gaffer n/a 268 15000010
Paul Threlkeld Dolly Grip n/a 264 15000011
Paul Williams Best Boy Grip n/a 265 15000012
Russell Caldwell Best Boy best boy electric 120885 15000013
Dave Tutokey Best Boy rigging best boy 120885 15000014
Cheryl Kurk Production Accountant n/a 282 16000001
Kelli Gillam Accountant payroll accountant 120802 16000002
John Hillman Assistant Accountant n/a 120950 16000003
Laure Brost Assistant Accountant accounting assistant 120950 16000004
John Robotham Stunt Coordinator n/a 120804 19000001
Christie Hayes Stunts n/a 240 19000002
Jason Rodriguez Stunts n/a 240 19000003
Eddie Matthews Stunts n/a 240 19000004
Kerry Rossall Stunts n/a 240 19000005
Noon Orsatti Stunts n/a 240 19000006
Peter Stader Stunts n/a 240 19000007
Jeff Ramsey Stunts n/a 240 19000008
Brian Williams Stunts n/a 240 19000009
Ronald Hairston Craft Service n/a 120903 22000001
Charles Drake Craft Service n/a 120903 22000002
Antoine Mascaro Catering (Gourmet on Location) 120954 22000003
Eric Rylander Special Effects Foreman n/a 250 23000001
Kevin Hannigan Special Effects Coordinator n/a 241 23000002
Scott Garcia Special Effects Assistant n/a 514 23000003
Alberto Lombardo Assistant Property Master n/a 120969 24000001
Peter Bankins Property Master n/a 120805 24000002
Caitlin Maloney Assistant (to Steven Soderberg, John Hardy & Scott Kramer) 120820 25000001
Allissa Juillet Production Assistant (Monterey) 275 25000002
Shane Greedy Transportation Captain n/a 272 25000003
Jon Carpenter Transportation Coordinator n/a 271 25000004
Colin O'Hara Post-Production Assistant n/a 120882 25000005
Allan Bragg Stand-In n/a 121015 25000006
Lauren Moore Stand-In n/a 121015 25000007
Michael LaCorte Set Production Assistant n/a 371 25000008
Lynn Struiksma Set Production Assistant n/a 371 25000009
Loren Bess Driver n/a 273 25000010
Brita McCollough Driver n/a 273 25000011
Gary Cheek Driver n/a 273 25000012
Douglas Miller Driver n/a 273 25000013
Emil Gergov Driver n/a 273 25000014
John Quittner Driver n/a 273 25000015
Dave Glavin Driver n/a 273 25000016
Chance Robertson Driver n/a 273 25000017
Diane Glavin Driver n/a 273 25000018
Chip Robinson Driver n/a 273 25000019
Leon Glavin Driver n/a 273 25000020
Albert Rusk Driver n/a 273 25000021
David Goodman Driver n/a 273 25000022
Bruce Shanahan Driver n/a 273 25000023
Jeff Lira Driver n/a 273 25000024
Cassandra Barbour Archival Footage footage clearances provider(Entertainment Clearances) 120984 26000001
Laura Sevier Archival Footage footage clearances provider(Entertainment Clearances) 120984 26000002
Scott Shordon Other stand-by painter 120795 26000003
Christine Hughen Other shopper 120795 26000004
Frank Endewardt Other electric 120795 26000005
Eric Lopez Other electric 120795 26000006
Reg Powell Other electric 120795 26000007
Roman Jakobi Other electric 120795 26000008
Kevin Brown Other electric 120795 26000009
Keith Hartley Other rigging electric 120795 26000010
Julian Del Valle Other light balloon technician 120795 26000011
Colin O'Hara Other production secretary 120795 26000012
Richard Bennetti Other picture car coordinator 120795 26000013
Keri Littledeer Other aid 120795 26000014
Ferguson Reid Other aid 120795 26000015
Eric Flickinger Other Vine Street Studios recordist 120795 26000016
Pat Stoltz Other Vine Street Studios engineering 120795 26000017
David Sabee Other contractor(music) 120795 26000018
Reed Ruddy Other recorder(Studio X--Seattle) 120795 26000019
Ken Loach Special Thanks n/a 120874 26000020
Quinn Donoghue Unit Publicist n/a 231 29000001
Synopsis
Wilson, a tough English ex-con who travels to Los Angeles to avenge his daughter's death. Upon arrival, Wilson goes to task battling an army of L.A.'s toughest criminals in the hopes of piecing together the events leading to her murder. As he survives a near-deadly beating, getting thrown out of a building and being chased down a dangerous mountain road, Wilson retaliates by doling out some bodily harm of his own. Before his trip is over, all of Los Angeles will know The Limey is in town.