Coyote Waits

Coyote Waits
Type TV Special
MPAA Rating N/A
Runtime 2hr
Genres Adaptation, Mystery
Keywords N/A
Status Completed
US Release Date
  
  • Erin Brockovich Review
    By:

    Underqualified, underdressed and increasingly desperate, Erin Brockovich opens the film with her name on it pleading for a skilled job she can sense is not going to be hers. No, she says, she has no actual medical training, but she does have three kids. She's great with people, and a fast learner, too. And she's always been interested in science, to the point of once being "madly in love with geology." Doesn't all that count for anything? Not yet it doesn't, but before "Erin Brockovich" is over those qualities will surface as major players in this irresistible, hugely satisfying feminist fairy tale that turns "Norma Rae" into the protagonist of "A Civil Action" and makes us believe it. Based on the true story of a woman the world didn't take seriously who empowered herself by helping others gain justice, "Erin Brockovich" does more than chronicle the rebirth of a downtrodden individual. It serves as a career milestone for director Steven Soderbergh, writer Susannah Grant and, most of all, star Julia Roberts. With films collectively hitting a worldwide gross of $2 billion, Roberts is arguably the most successful--and certainly most highly paid--of contemporary actresses. Yet there is the sense about "Erin Brockovich" that this is the part Roberts has long been looking for. It's a role that allows the actress, like her character, to use her allure for a good cause, to put her undeniable star qualities, her great gift for humor, empathy, romance and vulnerability, at the service of a character with real texture. Make no mistake, this is very much of an old-fashioned crowd-pleasing diva part, allowing Roberts to laugh and bawl, be sensitive and take no prisoners, but it also makes points about corporate malfeasance, self-esteem and the place of women in society that fluffier scenarios want no part of. Long determined to be taken seriously as an actress, Roberts has kissed a lot of frogs (wouldn't everyone like to forget "Mary Reilly"?) on the way to this satisfying triumph. As to director Soderbergh, who started with the justly celebrated "sex, lies, and videotape" and then went all over the place, his career has been no one-way rocket either. But two years ago, with the exceptional George Clooney-Jennifer Lopez vehicle "Out of Sight," he revealed an unlooked-for talent that's on display here as well. What Soderbergh can do as well as anyone is bring restraint, intelligence and subtlety to mainstream material, and what a difference that makes. To infuse an essential sense of unforced reality into stories that sound formulaic is to walk quite a fine line, and Soderbergh's gift for that, combined with Roberts' stardom, should finally supply the major box-office success that eluded him with "Out of Sight." Uniting that film and this one (and what hampered the clumsily written but well-directed one that came between them, "The Limey") is the presence of a strong and beautifully structured script. Writer Grant (helped by an uncredited polish from Richard LaGravenese) has presented strong women before in "Pocahontas" and "Ever After." But this script has more of a sense of life and it's especially adroit in placing believable and well-timed obstacles in the path of its inevitable resolution. In fact, given that the film's ad line ("She brought a small town to its feet and a huge company to its knees") effectively gives away the entire plot, it's amazing how much drama and pins-and-needles worry the film manages to wring from a foregone conclusion. Helping Soderbergh realize this script's potential are top-of-the-line people on both sides of the camera, including veteran independent film cinematographer Ed Lachman, five-time Oscar-nominated editor Anne V. Coates and costume designer Jeffrey Kurland, who has had enormous fun creating clothes for a character who is not afraid of a little exposure. For though her moral fiber couldn't be more spotless if she were played by Julie Andrews, Erin Brockovich does not dress like a saint. In fact, with her big hair, tiny miniskirts, 3-inch heels and an encyclopedic knowledge of the uses of cleavage, she looks more like a hooker than the character Roberts played in "Pretty Woman." Erin is also in the habit of speaking truth to power, of saying whatever comes into her mind to whoever's in her line of fire. "Twothings aggravate me," she claims in something of an understatement, "being ignored and being lied to." Roberts is especially adept at taking advantage of Erin's gift for devastating one-liners, none of which can be repeated in a family newspaper. One of the themes of "Erin Brockovich" is that appearances can be deceiving, so we know at once that Erin is a woman of sterling qualities. Yes, she's twice-divorced, $17,000 in debt with $74 in the bank, but Roberts' presence makes us implicitly believe it's only a matter of time until the world understands that under those skimpy clothes is a smart, hard-working, self-reliant woman just waiting to be gainfully employed. That employment was looking chancy until Erin came into contact with the majesty of the law as personified by Los Angeles attorney Ed Masry (Albert Finney). He represents her in a personal injury lawsuit that doesn't turn out well, and because Ed's the only potential employer she knows, Erin lays siege to his office until a barely entry-level job is forthcoming. Finney's role is largely that of Roberts' straight man, reacting with looks of horror at her unpredictable shenanigans. Still, the importance of Finney to the film's success shouldn't be underestimated. A well-schooled veteran, he brings integrity, stature and a sense of humor to the role of audience surrogate, never too blasé to be flummoxed by what Erin is up to. The other man in Erin's life is George ("In the Company of Men's" effective Aaron Eckhart), a motorcycle hunk with enough skin art to necessitate a credited Tattoo Designer. George not only lives next door to Erin, he's her masculine don't-trust-your-eyes mirror image, someone who under all that leather has the temperament of a caring nanny eager to watch her children while she attempts to save the world. Early on in her filing work at Ed Masry's office, Erin comes across some pro bono work he's doing involving residents of the Mojave Desert town of Hinkley. They're all getting sick and the mammoth PG&E corporation, the place's biggest employer, suspiciously claims to have nothing to do with it. Intrigued, Erin convinces Ed to let her look into the situation, and soon enough she is using her people skills and interest in science, not to mention her world-class flirting ability, to get at the heart of the problem and convince the townsfolk to let her and the lawyers do something about it. "Erin Brockovich" is helped, as was "Out of Sight," by excellent acting down to its smallest roles. Finely cast by Margery Simkin, the script was strong enough to attract talents like Cherry Jones and Marg Helgenberger to supporting but pivotal roles as townspeople and is obviously much the stronger for it. There are also a pair of amusing cameos, one by the real Erin Brockovich as a waitress who waits, in effect, on herself, and the other by producer Michael Shamberg, convincing as an untrustworthy corporate attorney. Though the publicity material huffs and puffs about Erin being a role model for the new millennium, in fact what's most exciting about this film is how old-fashioned it is at its core. It uses standard Hollywood building blocks like big stars and a Cinderella story line laced with laughter and tears and reminds us why they became standard in the first place. More than anything, it reminds us how much intelligent entertainment value there can be in traditional material, if only someone has the wit to realize it and the skill to get it out. MPAA rating: R, for language. Times guidelin es: Brockovich is a torrent of profanity. 'Erin Brockovich' Julia Roberts: Erin Brockovich Albert Finney: Ed Masry Aaron Eckhart: George Marg Helgenberger: Donna Jensen Cherry Jones: Pamela Duncan Peter Coyote: Kurt Potter Universal Pictures and Columbia Pictures present a Jersey Films production. Director Steven Soderbergh. Producers Danny DeVito, Michael Shamberg, Stacey Sher. Written by Susannah Grant. Executive producers John Hardy, Carla Santos Shamberg. Cinematographer Ed Lachman. Editor Anne V. Coates. Production design Philip Messina. Music Thomas Newman. Costumes Jeffrey Kurland. Art director Christa Munro. Set decorator Kristen Toscano Messina. Running time: 2 hours, 11 minutes.

  • Erin Brockovich Review
    By:

    StoryUnderqualified, underdressed and increasingly desperate, Erin Brockovich opens the film with her name on it pleading for a skilled job she can sense is not going to be hers. No, she says, she has no actual medical training, but she does have three kids. She's great with people, and a fast learner, too. And she's always been interested in science, to the point of once being "madly in love with geology." Doesn't all that count for anything? Not yet it doesn't, but before "Erin Brockovich" is over those qualities will surface as major players in this irresistible, hugely satisfying feminist fairy tale that turns "Norma Rae" into the protagonist of "A Civil Action" and makes us believe it. DirectorBased on the true story of a woman the world didn't take seriously who empowered herself by helping others gain justice, "Erin Brockovich" does more than chronicle the rebirth of a downtrodden individual. It serves as a career milestone for director Steven Soderbergh, writer Susannah Grant and, most of all, star Julia Roberts. With films collectively hitting a worldwide gross of $2 billion, Roberts is arguably the most successful--and certainly most highly paid--of contemporary actresses. Yet there is the sense about "Erin Brockovich" that this is the part Roberts has long been looking for. It's a role that allows the actress, like her character, to use her allure for a good cause, to put her undeniable star qualities, her great gift for humor, empathy, romance and vulnerability, at the service of a character with real texture. Make no mistake, this is very much of an old-fashioned crowd-pleasing diva part, allowing Roberts to laugh and bawl, be sensitive and take no prisoners, but it also makes points about corporate malfeasance, self-esteem and the place of women in society that fluffier scenarios want no part of. Long determined to be taken seriously as an actress, Roberts has kissed a lot of frogs (wouldn't everyone like to forget "Mary Reilly"?) on the way to this satisfying triumph. As to director Soderbergh, who started with the justly celebrated "sex, lies, and videotape" and then went all over the place, his career has been no one-way rocket either. But two years ago, with the exceptional George Clooney-Jennifer Lopez vehicle "Out of Sight," he revealed an unlooked-for talent that's on display here as well. What Soderbergh can do as well as anyone is bring restraint, intelligence and subtlety to mainstream material, and what a difference that makes. To infuse an essential sense of unforced reality into stories that sound formulaic is to walk quite a fine line, and Soderbergh's gift for that, combined with Roberts' stardom, should finally supply the major box-office success that eluded him with "Out of Sight." Uniting that film and this one (and what hampered the clumsily written but well-directed one that came between them, "The Limey") is the presence of a strong and beautifully structured script. Writer Grant (helped by an uncredited polish from Richard LaGravenese) has presented strong women before in "Pocahontas" and "Ever After." But this script has more of a sense of life and it's especially adroit in placing believable and well-timed obstacles in the path of its inevitable resolution. In fact, given that the film's ad line ("She brought a small town to its feet and a huge company to its knees") effectively gives away the entire plot, it's amazing how much drama and pins-and-needles worry the film manages to wring from a foregone conclusion. Helping Soderbergh realize this script's potential are top-of-the-line people on both sides of the camera, including veteran independent film cinematographer Ed Lachman, five-time Oscar-nominated editor Anne V. Coates and costume designer Jeffrey Kurland, who has had enormous fun creating clothes for a character who is not afraid of a little exposure. For though her moral fiber couldn't be more spotless if she were played by Julie Andrews, Erin Brockovich does not dress like a saint. In fact, with her big hair, tiny miniskirts, 3-inch heels and an encyclopedic knowledge of the uses of cleavage, she looks more like a hooker than the character Roberts played in "Pretty Woman." Erin is also in the habit of speaking truth to power, of saying whatever comes into her mind to whoever's in her line of fire. "Twothings aggravate me," she claims in something of an understatement, "being ignored and being lied to." Roberts is especially adept at taking advantage of Erin's gift for devastating one-liners, none of which can be repeated in a family newspaper. One of the themes of "Erin Brockovich" is that appearances can be deceiving, so we know at once that Erin is a woman of sterling qualities. Yes, she's twice-divorced, $17,000 in debt with $74 in the bank, but Roberts' presence makes us implicitly believe it's only a matter of time until the world understands that under those skimpy clothes is a smart, hard-working, self-reliant woman just waiting to be gainfully employed. That employment was looking chancy until Erin came into contact with the majesty of the law as personified by Los Angeles attorney Ed Masry (Albert Finney). He represents her in a personal injury lawsuit that doesn't turn out well, and because Ed's the only potential employer she knows, Erin lays siege to his office until a barely entry-level job is forthcoming. Finney's role is largely that of Roberts' straight man, reacting with looks of horror at her unpredictable shenanigans. Still, the importance of Finney to the film's success shouldn't be underestimated. A well-schooled veteran, he brings integrity, stature and a sense of humor to the role of audience surrogate, never too blasé to be flummoxed by what Erin is up to. The other man in Erin's life is George ("In the Company of Men's" effective Aaron Eckhart), a motorcycle hunk with enough skin art to necessitate a credited Tattoo Designer. George not only lives next door to Erin, he's her masculine don't-trust-your-eyes mirror image, someone who under all that leather has the temperament of a caring nanny eager to watch her children while she attempts to save the world. Early on in her filing work at Ed Masry's office, Erin comes across some pro bono work he's doing involving residents of the Mojave Desert town of Hinkley. They're all getting sick and the mammoth PG&E corporation, the place's biggest employer, suspiciously claims to have nothing to do with it. Intrigued, Erin convinces Ed to let her look into the situation, and soon enough she is using her people skills and interest in science, not to mention her world-class flirting ability, to get at the heart of the problem and convince the townsfolk to let her and the lawyers do something about it. "Erin Brockovich" is helped, as was "Out of Sight," by excellent acting down to its smallest roles. Finely cast by Margery Simkin, the script was strong enough to attract talents like Cherry Jones and Marg Helgenberger to supporting but pivotal roles as townspeople and is obviously much the stronger for it. There are also a pair of amusing cameos, one by the real Erin Brockovich as a waitress who waits, in effect, on herself, and the other by producer Michael Shamberg, convincing as an untrustworthy corporate attorney. Though the publicity material huffs and puffs about Erin being a role model for the new millennium, in fact what's most exciting about this film is how old-fashioned it is at its core. It uses standard Hollywood building blocks like big stars and a Cinderella story line laced with laughter and tears and reminds us why they became standard in the first place. More than anything, it reminds us how much intelligent entertainment value there can be in traditional material, if only someone has the wit to realize it and the skill to get it out. MPAA rating: R, for language. Times guidelines: Brockovich is a torrent of profanity. 'Erin Brockovich' Julia Roberts: Erin Brockovich Albert Finney: Ed Masry Aaron Eckhart: George Marg Helgenberger: Donna Jensen Cherry Jones: Pamela Duncan Peter Coyote: Kurt Potter Universal Pictures and Columbia Pictures present a Jersey Films production. Director Steven Soderbergh. Producers Danny DeVito, Michael Shamberg, Stacey Sher. Written by Susannah Grant. Executive producers John Hardy, Carla Santos Shamberg. Cinematographer Ed Lachman. Editor Anne V. Coates. Production design Philip Messina. Music Thomas Newman. Costumes Jeffrey Kurland. Art director Christa Munro. Set decorator Kristen Toscano Messina. Running time: 2 hours, 11 minutes.

Name Credit Credited as Role Id Sort Order
Wes Studi Actor Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn 1 1000001
Adam Beach Actor Officer Jim Chee 1 1000002
Jimmy Herman Actor Ashie Pinto 1 1000003
Sheila Tousey Actor Emma Leaphorn 1 1000004
Alex Rice Actor Janet Pete 1 1000005
Keith Carradine Actor John McGinnis 1 1000006
Graham Greene Actor Slick Nakai 1 1000007
Long Nguyen Actor Colonel Huan Ji 1 1000008
Joseph Tran Actor Taka Ji 1 1000009
Bodhi Elfman Actor Odell Redd 1 1000010
Gary Farmer Actor Captain Largo 1 1000011
Jack Burning Actor Hosteen Nakai 1 1000012
Jenni Blong Actor Ava Walker 1 1000013
Paul Guilfoyle Actor Jay Kennedy 1 1000014
Candice Castello Actor Jen 1 1000015
Gary Kanin Actor Judge 1 1000016
Mark Kilburn Actor Doctor 1 1000017
Jill Scott Momaday Actor Mary Keeyani 1 1000018
Sheri Foster Actor Blue Lady 1 1000019
Mark Mouchet Actor Mailman 1 1000020
Kevin Skousen Actor City Police Officer 1 1000021
Cami Leonard Actor Delbert's Wife 1 1000022
Richard Wiles Actor Court Officer 1 1000023
Chris Ahmie Actor Tribal Police Officer 1 1000024
Jan Egleson Director n/a 2 2000001
Robert Redford Executive Producer n/a 174 3000001
Rebecca Eaton Executive Producer n/a 174 3000002
Jonathan Powell Executive Producer (Carlton International Media) 174 3000003
Craig McNeil Producer n/a 3 3000004
Steven Ashley Producer (Mystery!) 3 3000005
Lucky Gold Teleplay n/a 120783 4000001
Tony Hillerman Source Material (From Novel: Coyote Waits) 120786 4000002
Patty Long Unit Production Manager n/a 182 5000001
Diana Lui Production Supervisor n/a 307 5000002
Gwyneth Horder-Payton Assistant Director n/a 163 5000003
Stephanie P O'Brien Assistant Director n/a 163 5000004
Robin Maybin Hensley Post-Production Supervisor n/a 120796 5000005
Steve Turner Post-Production Supervisor n/a 120796 5000006
Alan D Swain IV Location Manager n/a 193 5000007
Joanna Kennedy Script Supervisor n/a 191 5000008
Sharon C Dietz Production Coordinator n/a 162 5000009
Christian Diaz de Bedoya Location Assistant n/a 120947 5000010
Rachel Srigley Assistant Production Coordinator n/a 192 5000011
Steven Marble Assistant Location Manager n/a 194 5000012
Roy Wagner Director of Photography n/a 120780 6000001
Dan Ayers Camera Operator n/a 239 6000002
Dan Ayers Steadicam Operator n/a 232 6000003
Erin Cameron Camera n/a 120798 6000004
David C Herman Camera n/a 120798 6000005
T Fouts Assistant Camera 1st Assistant A Camera 233 6000006
Darin Krask Assistant Camera 2nd Assistant A Camera 233 6000007
Steve Banister Assistant Camera 1st Assistant B Camera 233 6000008
Patrick Bensimmon Assistant Camera 2nd Assistant B Camera 233 6000009
Neil Jacobs Photography Still Photography 120835 6000010
Gabe Pfeiffer Loader n/a 120956 6000011
Pam Moreau Colorist n/a 120920 6000012
Kathryn Himoff Editor n/a 172 7000001
Kathleen Cahill Editor (Mystery!) 172 7000002
Spencer Gentry On-Line Editor (Mystery!) 120811 7000003
Mark Steele On-Line Editor (Mystery!) 120811 7000004
Philip Norden Assistant Editor n/a 203 7000005
B.C. Smith Music n/a 120781 8000001
Mike Flicker Music Editor n/a 214 8000002
Reed Ruddy Music Engineer Engineer 120837 8000003
Edgardo Simone Original Music Orchestrator 120838 8000004
Northwest Sinfonia Original Music n/a 120838 8000005
Hovia S Edwards Soloist Flute Soloist 121021 8000006
Peter DeRose Song ("Have You Ever Been Lonely") 120859 8000007
Billy Hill Song ("Have You Ever Been Lonely") 120859 8000008
Patsy Cline Song Performer ("Have You Ever Been Lonely") 120788 8000009
Conway Twitty Song Performer ("Lonely Blue Boy") 120788 8000010
Richard Toyon Production Designer n/a 164 9000001
Marcia Calosio Set Decorator n/a 165 9000002
Jeremy Cassells Art Director n/a 183 9000003
Mark C Hansen Set Dresser n/a 197 9000004
Ralinda Vermeer Set Dresser n/a 197 9000005
Peter Tosti Stephenson Set Dresser n/a 197 9000006
Scott Lewis Set Dresser n/a 197 9000007
Christian Klump Scenic Artist Lead Scenic 745 9000008
Jeremy Chiordi Painter n/a 200 9000009
Jeffri Welsh Painter n/a 200 9000010
Rotem Noyfeld Painter n/a 200 9000011
Caleb Ransom Painter n/a 200 9000012
Mark Alan Duran Leadman n/a 433 9000013
Michael Lovato Greensman n/a 201 9000014
Brian P Shaffer Greensman n/a 201 9000015
Albert Rivera Greensman n/a 201 9000016
Cee Dresser n/a 120967 9000017
Faith Strongheart Art Department Coordinator n/a 195 9000018
Rene Haynes Casting Director n/a 157 10000001
Jeff Ham Casting Associate n/a 160 10000002
Darlene "Ka-Mook" Nichols Extras Casting n/a 120851 10000003
Erin Delaney Post-Production Executive Post-Production Director(Mystery!) 120876 11000001
Tony Hillerman Consultant n/a 120784 12000001
Gary Louis Technical Advisor Navajo Technical Advisor 537 12000002
William Nelson Sr. Technical Advisor Navajo Technical Advisor 537 12000003
Billy Ray Technical Advisor Navajo Technical Advisor 537 12000004
Ben Hernandez Instructor Teacher 121095 12000005
Birgitta Bjerke Costume Designer n/a 169 13000001
Mary Weir Costume Supervisor n/a 120895 13000002
Brad Booth Costumer n/a 120880 13000003
Gretchen Bright Hair n/a 120794 13000004
Elizabeth Marshall Hair n/a 120794 13000005
Claudia Breckenridge Hair Stylist n/a 120799 13000006
Gretchen Bright Makeup n/a 353 13000007
Elizabeth Marshall Makeup n/a 353 13000008
Leah Rial Makeup Artist n/a 120801 13000009
Kent Alan Parker Set Costumer n/a 121008 13000010
Mike McNerney ADR n/a 120912 14000001
Debby Ruby-Winsberg ADR Mixer n/a 227 14000002
Marie Brazil ADR Voice Casting n/a 2515 14000003
Michael P Becker Boom Operator n/a 215 14000004
Kevin Burns Rerecording Mixer n/a 120856 14000005
Todd Orr Rerecording Mixer n/a 120856 14000006
David Brownlow Sound Mixer n/a 230 14000007
Chris Fidor Sound Recordist Recordist 331 14000008
Jason George Supervising Sound Editor n/a 328 14000009
Harland Espeset Key Grip n/a 263 15000001
Eric Espeset Grip n/a 365 15000002
Asa-Luke Twocrow Grip n/a 365 15000003
Dan Nordquist Grip n/a 365 15000004
Jon Caradies Grip n/a 365 15000005
Jeff Becke Grip n/a 365 15000006
David Cummings Grip n/a 365 15000007
Benjamin Estrada Electrician n/a 450 15000008
Steve Litecky Electrician n/a 450 15000009
Frank Tapia Electrician n/a 450 15000010
Michael Vetter Electrician n/a 450 15000011
Joe Abraham Dean Electrician n/a 450 15000012
Robert Mongiello Electrician n/a 450 15000013
Leonard E Hoffman Electrician n/a 450 15000014
Richard Nasworthy Dolly Grip n/a 264 15000015
Brian Crane Chief Lighting Technician n/a 357 15000016
Mark J Anderson Best Boy Grip n/a 265 15000017
Myke Groves Best Boy Electric n/a 259 15000018
Marjorie Chodorov Accountant n/a 120802 16000001
Carey Edward Kienitz Jr. Assistant Accountant n/a 120950 16000002
Deborah Gibbs Business Affairs Business Manager(Mystery!) 120792 18000001
Lou Simon Stunt Coordinator n/a 120804 19000001
Peter King Stunts n/a 240 19000002
Fredrick Lopez Stunts n/a 240 19000003
Caroline Invicta Stevenson Animal Wrangler n/a 120863 20000001
Bob Myers Animal Wrangler Snake Wrangler 120863 20000002
John Bendele Carpenter n/a 529 21000001
Ryan Cowles Carpenter n/a 529 21000002
Matthew Feight Carpenter n/a 529 21000003
Ben Bishop Carpenter n/a 529 21000004
Sky Carpenter n/a 529 21000005
Delaney Marsh Carpenter n/a 529 21000006
Will Mim Mack Carpenter n/a 529 21000007
Rolland Lock Feight Construction Foreman n/a 277 21000008
J Fegan Construction Coordinator n/a 276 21000009
Dianna M Valenzuela Craft Service n/a 120903 22000001
Mary Margaret Smith Craft Service n/a 120903 22000002
Patrick Duchesne Catering n/a 120954 22000003
James Foley Catering Chef Assistant 120954 22000004
Richard P Ramirez Catering Chef Assistant 120954 22000005
Barbara Marshall Visual Effects Supervisor (Encore Hollywood) 249 23000001
Laurie Ryan Visual Effects Supervisor (Encore Hollywood) 249 23000002
Ken Speed Special Effects Coordinator n/a 241 23000003
Scott Hastings Special Effects n/a 168 23000004
Geoffrey C Martin Special Effects n/a 168 23000005
Charles Sheehan Assistant Props n/a 120904 24000001
Benjamin C Lowney Property Master n/a 120805 24000002
Amy Morrison Props Buyer Buyer 120926 24000003
Starla Davis Assistant (to the Producer) 120820 25000001
Brianne Solomon Production Assistant n/a 275 25000002
Cameron Velarde Production Assistant n/a 275 25000003
Mirielle R Begay Production Assistant n/a 275 25000004
Jennifer Frankel Production Assistant (Mystery!) 275 25000005
Michael B Russell Transportation Captain n/a 272 25000006
Kenny Mason Transportation Coordinator n/a 271 25000007
Tacanumpa W Banks Stand-In n/a 121015 25000008
Cleta Ellington Set Production Assistant n/a 371 25000009
Elizabeth Gabel Set Production Assistant n/a 371 25000010
Casey Ray Set Production Assistant n/a 371 25000011
Matthew Halbert Production Utility 120824 25000012
Robbie Mueller Office Production Assistant n/a 120909 25000013
Benjamin S Rogerson Office Production Assistant n/a 120909 25000014
David L Bethel Medic n/a 120966 25000015
Douglas Neal Acton Medic n/a 120966 25000016
Michael A Sandoval Medic n/a 120966 25000017
Aimie Olson Medic n/a 120966 25000018
William "Wild Bill" Laczko Driver n/a 273 25000019
Pedro Amaya Driver n/a 273 25000020
Lindsay Elliott Driver n/a 273 25000021
Greg Bronner Driver n/a 273 25000022
Cassie Russell Driver n/a 273 25000023
Kino Quintana Driver n/a 273 25000024
Al Cantu Driver n/a 273 25000025
Jesse Esquibel Driver n/a 273 25000026
John Anthony Ford Driver n/a 273 25000027
Rhonda Hansen Driver n/a 273 25000028
George Lebow Driver n/a 273 25000029
Martin W Haydon Driver n/a 273 25000030
Derik Pritchard Driver n/a 273 25000031
Bruce A Samuel Driver n/a 273 25000032
Chris Gallegos Driver n/a 273 25000033
Jami Rogers Coordinator (Mystery!) 528 25000034
Ellen Dockser Publicity (Mystery!) 120789 29000001
Johanna Baker Publicity (Mystery!) 120789 29000002
Synopsis
A pair of Native American/Navajo tribal police try to draw a connection between a vandal painting odd symbols on a nearby mountainside, a professor's obsession with the final days of Butch Cassidy and a series of murders, including one of a local cop.
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