‘Safe Haven’ Vs. ‘How I Met Your Mother': Cobie Smulders Debates Her Romances — VIDEO

Cobie Smulders in 'Safe Haven'

Ranking among the great purveyors of romance — the Shakespeares, the Austens, the Hallmarks — is actress Cobie Smulders.

Okay, she might not be responsible for timeless stage tragedies depicting accounts of star-crossed love, or farcical novels about hubristic affection. Or, you know, Snoopy cards. But she’s attached to a couple of pretty prominent heartfelt conquests in modern pop culture: her new movie Safe Haven and her long-running sitcom How I Met Your Mother. The question is, then, which of the two is the truer love story?

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We spoke to Smulders about the new Nicholas Sparks film, in which she stars beside the spotlit couple Julianne Hough and Josh Duhamel. Moviegoers will watch the pair ebb and flow through an emotional river no doubt, but what we want to know is if the Safe Haven romance can live up to Smulders’ other onscreen love story — the How I Met Your Mother ballad of Robin (Smulders) and Barney (Neil Patrick Harris). It might be a tough call, but as Smulders argues in the video below, “They don’t show the lead guy in a Nicholas Sparks movie doing a bunch of slutty chicks.”

RELATED: ‘Safe Haven’ Star Josh Duhamel Says Channing Tatum Hazed Him

Smulders chimes in on more about her latest feature film in the clip, comparing her husband Taran Killam to Duhamel’s Safe Haven character Alex: “[He] is a dad, he’s really down-to-Earth.” Watch the interview, and catch Safe Haven in theaters now.

Reporting by Jessica Courtemanche

[Photo Credit: Relativity Media]


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Staff editor Michael Arbeiter’s natural state of being can best be described as “mild panic attack.” His earliest memories of growing up in Queens, New York, involve nighttime conversations with a voice from his bedroom wall (the jury’s still out on what that was all about) and a love for classic television that spawned from the very first time he was allowed to watch “The Munsters.” Attending college at SUNY Binghamton, a 20-year-old Michael learned two things: that he could center his future on this love for TV and movies, and that dragons never actually existed — he was kind of late in the game on that one.

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